Learning to Stand and Speak: Women, Education, and Public Life in America's Republic / Edition 1

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Overview

Education was decisive in recasting women's subjectivity and the lived reality of their collective experience in post-Revolutionary and antebellum America. Asking how and why women shaped their lives anew through education, Mary Kelley measures the significant transformation in individual and social identities fostered by female academies and seminaries. Constituted in a curriculum that matched the course of study at male colleges, women's liberal learning, Kelley argues, played a key role in one of the most profound changes in gender relations in the nation's history: the movement of women into public life.

By the 1850s, the large majority of women deeply engaged in public life as educators, writers, editors, and reformers had been schooled at female academies and seminaries. Although most women did not enter these professions, many participated in networks of readers, literary societies, or voluntary associations that became the basis for benevolent societies, reform movements, and activism in the antebellum period. Kelley's analysis demonstrates that female academies and seminaries taught women crucial writing, oration, and reasoning skills that prepared them to claim the rights and obligations of citizenship.

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"A work of serious scholarship. . . . An inspiring contribution to the story of women's quiet success in asserting their intellectual and social value."--Roanoke Times
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Product Details

Meet the Author

Mary Kelley is Ruth Bordin Collegiate Professor of History, American Culture, and Women's Studies at the University of Michigan. She is author, coauthor, or editor of six books, including Private Woman, Public Stage: Literary Domesticity in Nineteenth-Century America, The Limits of Sisterhood: The Beecher Sisters on Women's Rights and Woman's Sphere, and The Power of Her Sympathy: The Autobiography and Journal of Catharine Maria Sedgwick.
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Table of Contents

Ch. 1 You will arrive at distinguished usefulness : the grounds for women's entry into public life 16
Ch. 2 The need of their genius : the rights and obligations of schooling 34
Ch. 3 Female academies are everywhere establishing : curriculum and pedagogy 66
Ch. 4 Meeting in this social way to search for truth : literary societies, reading circles, and mutual improvement associations 112
Ch. 5 The privilege of reading : women, books, and self-imagining 154
Ch. 6 Whether to make her surname more or adams : women writing women's history 191
Ch. 7 The mind is, in a sense, its own home : gendered republicanism as lived experience 245
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