Leaving Springfield: The Simpsons and the Possibility of Oppositional Culture / Edition 1

Paperback (Print)
Rent
Rent from BN.com
$8.37
(Save 70%)
Est. Return Date: 11/30/2014
Used and New from Other Sellers
Used and New from Other Sellers
from $6.49
Usually ships in 1-2 business days
(Save 76%)
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (9) from $6.49   
  • New (4) from $23.88   
  • Used (5) from $6.49   

Overview

Since its first appearance as a series of cartoon vignettes in 1987 and its debut as a weekly program in 1990, The Simpsons has had multiple, even contradictory, media identities. Although the show has featured biting political and social satire, which often proves fatal to mass public acceptance, The Simpsons entered fully into the mainstream, consistently earning high ratings from audiences and critics alike.

Leaving Springfield addresses the success of The Simpsons as a corporate-manufactured show that openly and self-reflexively parodies the very consumer capitalism it simultaneously promotes. By exploring such topics as the impact of the show’s satire on its diverse viewing public and the position of The Simpsons in sitcom and television animation history, the commentators develop insights into the ways parody intermixes with mass media to critique post modern society.

In spite of the longevity and high cultural profile of the show, The Simpsons has so far attracted only scattered academic attention. Leaving Springfield will be of importance to both scholars of media and fans of the show interested in the function of satire in popular culture in general and television in particular.

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780814328491
  • Publisher: Wayne State University Press
  • Publication date: 12/28/2003
  • Series: Contemporary Approaches to Film and Media Series
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 384
  • Sales rank: 882,108
  • Product dimensions: 6.00 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 0.79 (d)

Meet the Author

John Alberti is Associate Professor of English at Northern Kentucky University.
Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Acknowledgments
Introduction
"Use a Pen, Sideshow Bob": The Simpsons and the Threat of High Culture 1
Commodity Culture and Its Discontents: Mr. Bennett, Bart Simpson, and the Rhetoric of Modernism 29
The Simpsons and Hanna-Barbera's Animation Legacy 63
Countercultural Literacy: Learning Irony with The Simpsons 85
Homer Erectus: Homer Simpson As Everyman ... and Every Woman 107
Who Wants Candy? Disenchantment in The Simpsons 137
Myth or Consequences: Ideological Fault Lines in The Simpsons 172
"So Television's Responsible!": Oppositionality and the Interpretive Logic of Satire and Censorship in The Simpsons and South Park 197
Looking for Amanda Hugginkiss: Gay Life on The Simpsons 225
Releasing the Hounds: The Simpsons As Anti-Nuclear Satire 244
Local Satire with a Global Reach: Ethnic Stereotyping and Cross-Cultural Conflicts in The Simpsons 273
Bart Simpson: Prince of Irreverence 292
List of Episodes Cited 303
The Simpsons Complete Episode Guide, Season 1-13 309
About the Contributors 327
Index 331
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)