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Leaving St. Kilda
     

Leaving St. Kilda

by The Tannahill Weavers
 
While groups like the Bothy Band and DeDannann reclaimed Irish song in the early '70s, the Tannahill Weavers did the same for things Scottish. And they're still at it. With twin muses -- Scottish poets Robert Tannahill and Robert Burns -- providing more than a few drams of lyric, these fine lads harmonize in a bright, shimmering, almost Beach

Overview

While groups like the Bothy Band and DeDannann reclaimed Irish song in the early '70s, the Tannahill Weavers did the same for things Scottish. And they're still at it. With twin muses -- Scottish poets Robert Tannahill and Robert Burns -- providing more than a few drams of lyric, these fine lads harmonize in a bright, shimmering, almost Beach Boys way. Their originals have the ring of tradition, their musicianship is never short of sterling, and you could take almost any of the dozen Tannies albums as essential. The boys did try to make a casual fan's life easier by releasing two CHOICE CUTS discs (1979-86 and 1987-96). But for my money, LEAVING ST. KILDA, their 1996 offering, is the quintessence of everything great about the band; it marks a point where they crossed from being one of many bands who admirably follow tradition, to one of the few who make it. As is the Tannies' custom, the album includes a Scots glossary, so you'll no' gar (make) yer heid (head) all bluidy (bloody) tryin' to ken (know) the difference between a weel-stocket mailin (well-stocked farm landlord) and a jad (a woman past her prime).

Editorial Reviews

All Music Guide - Rick Anderson
The Tannahill Weavers have never really made a weak album, and this one is far from weak, but their best albums all have one or two moments of emotional and musical transcendence, and there are not any such moments on Leaving St. Kilda. As usual, the songs are more exciting than the instrumental sets, which are generally dominated by the sound of the highland pipes and get to be just a bit much by the third or fourth tune in the set (though the gorgeous "St. Kilda Set" is a notable exception on this album). Leaving St. Kilda peaks at the end with a ravishingly beautiful song of farewell entitled "Fareweel You Silver Darlin's" (written by guitarist and lead singer Roy Gullane), but other highlights include the slightly creepy "The Shearin's No for You" (in which a young swain reassures his love that he really has no intention of killing her) and the hearty drinking song "The Three Healths." There is also a very fine version of the classic William Motherwell song "The Wars o' Germany." If Leaving St. Kilda falls a bit short of the Tannahill Weavers' best work, that fact only underscores the consistently high quality of their other albums.

Product Details

Release Date:
10/15/1996
Label:
Green Linnet
UPC:
0048248117623
catalogNumber:
481176
Rank:
111439

Related Subjects

Tracks

Album Credits

Performance Credits

Tannahill Weavers   Primary Artist
Roy Gullane   Guitar,Vocals
Phil Smillie   Flute,Vocals,Whistle (Instrument)
John Martin   Fiddle,Mandolin,Cello,Viola,Vocals
Wilson   Bouzouki,Guitar,Keyboards,Vocals
Duncan J. Nicholson   Bagpipes,Pipe,Whistle (Instrument)

Technical Credits

Rod MacDonald   Composer
Tannahill Weavers   Producer
Terry Adams   Engineer
J. Allen   Composer
Don MacLeod   Composer
Donald Sanders   Illustrations
Robert Wallace   Composer
Traditional   Composer
Robert Burns   Composer

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