Lectures on Preternatural and Complex Parturition and Lactation

Lectures on Preternatural and Complex Parturition and Lactation

by Edward William Murphy
     
 

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1852 Excerpt: ...lighted up with delight. She said the chloroform caused her a much more refreshing sleep than she had previously enjoyed, so much so, that when first spoken

Overview

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1852 Excerpt: ...lighted up with delight. She said the chloroform caused her a much more refreshing sleep than she had previously enjoyed, so much so, that when first spoken to, she felt annoyed at being disturbed. I watched this case most anxiously, lest some post-partum mischief might arise, but I was astonished to find that symptoms of restlessness, prostration, and subsequent inflammation, that I had been accustomed to observe in these severe cases, were altogether absent. I never saw a patient recover so well nor in so short a time. This fact made me a convert to chloroform. It possessed all the advantages that were sought for in sulphuric aether; no apparatus was essential, the vapour was devoid of all pungency, and had an agreeable smell like apples when kept for some time; the stage of excitation was often scarcely apparent, being so rapidly followed by that of sopor, the quantity required to produce anaesthetic effects was very small as compared with sulphuric aether, and consequently chloroform soon superseded it both on the continent and in America. Such is a brief outline of the history of this agent, and before we enter upon the question of its advantage or disadvantage in the practice of midwifery, we must first consider what it is. Surgical Experience of Chloroform, by Professor Miller, p. 10, 1!. + Account of a new Anaesthctic Agent as a Substitute for Sulphuric Ether in Surgery and Midwifery, by J. Y. Simpson, M.D. Edin. 1847. Chloroform is one of many substances that possess similar properties, only differing in degree. Hydrogen and carbon form their base, and this may exist either alone or united with a third element, and thus form a ternary compound. They all possess in a greater or less degree anaesthetic properties; they all seem to influence the nervo...

Product Details

ISBN-13:
2940025602729
Publisher:
Taylor, Walton and Maberly
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
File size:
856 KB

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