Lectures on Rhetoric and Belles Lettres [NOOK Book]

Overview

This new edition of Hugh Blair's Lectures on Rhetoric and Belles Lettres, edited by Linda Ferreira-Buckley and S. Michael Halloran, answers the need for a complete, reliable text. The book seeks to generate a renewed interest in Blair by provoking new inquiries into the tradition of belletristic rhetoric and by serving as both aid and incentive to others who may join in the project of improving understanding of this landmark rhetorical scholarship.

This edition contains ...

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Lectures on Rhetoric and Belles Lettres

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Overview

This new edition of Hugh Blair's Lectures on Rhetoric and Belles Lettres, edited by Linda Ferreira-Buckley and S. Michael Halloran, answers the need for a complete, reliable text. The book seeks to generate a renewed interest in Blair by provoking new inquiries into the tradition of belletristic rhetoric and by serving as both aid and incentive to others who may join in the project of improving understanding of this landmark rhetorical scholarship.

This edition contains forty-seven lectures and remains faithful to the text of the 1785 London edition. The editors contextualize Hugh Blair's motivations and thinking by providing in their introduction an extended account of Blair's lif eand era. The bibliography of works by and about Blair is an invaluable aid, surpassing previous research on Blair.

Although the extent of its influence cannot be measured fully, Blair's Lectures on Rhetoric and Belles Lettres was undoubtedly a primary vehicle for introducing many eighteenth- and nineteenth-century scholars to classical rhetoric and French belletristic rhetoric-its success due in part to the ease with which the lectures combine neoclassical and Enlightenment thought, accommodating emerging social concerns. Ferreira-Buckley and Halloran's and extensive treatment revives the tradition of belletristic rhetoric, improving the understanding of Blair's place in the study of eighteenth- and nineteenth-century discourse, while finding him relevant in the twenty-first century.

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Product Details

  • BN ID: 2940025631439
  • Publisher: T. Cadell and W. Davies
  • Format: eBook
  • Edition description: Digitized from 1809 volume
  • File size: 580 KB

Meet the Author

Linda Ferreira-Buckley is an associate professor of English and rhetoric at the University of Texas at Austin, where she teaches courses in writing, the history of rhetoric and English studies, and Victorian literature. Her work has appeared in such journals as College English and Rhetoric Review.

S. Michael Halloran is a professor at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute where he teaches graduate and undergraduate courses in rhetorical theory and analysis, emphasizing connections with history and communication media. He is the coeditor (with Gregory Clark) of Oratorical Culture in Nineteenth-Century America: Essays on the Transformation of the Theory and Practice of Rhetoric.  

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Table of Contents

Lecture I Introduction 3
Lecture II Taste 10
Lecture III Criticism - genius - pleasure of taste - sublimity in objects 21
Lecture IV The sublime in writing 32
Lecture V Beauty, and other pleasures of taste 45
Lecture VI Rise and progress of language 54
Lecture VII Rise and progress of language, and of writing 65
Lecture VIII Structure of language 75
Lecture IX Structure of language - English tongue 87
Lecture X Style - perspicuity and precision 99
Lecture XI Structure of sentences 110
Lecture XII Structure of sentences 121
Lecture XIII Structure of sentences - harmony 132
Lecture XIV Origin and nature of figurative language 145
Lecture XV Metaphor 157
Lecture XVI Hyperbole - personification - apostrophe 170
Lecture XVII Comparison, antithesis, interrogation, exclamation, other figures of speech 184
Lecture XVIII Figurative language - general characters of style - diffuse, concise - feeble, nervous - dry, plain, neat, elegant, flowery 195
Lecture XIX General characters of style - simple, affected, vehement - directions for forming a proper style 208
Lecture XX Critical examination of the style of Mr. Addison, in no. 411 of the Spectator 219
Lecture XXI Critical examination of the style in no. 412 of the Spectator 229
Lecture XXII Critical examination of the style in no. 413 of the Spectator 238
Lecture XXIII Critical examination of the style in no. 414 of the Spectator 246
Lecture XXIV Critical examination of the style in a passage of Dean Swift's writings 253
Lecture XXV Eloquence, or public speaking - history of eloquence - Grecian eloquence - Demosthenes 264
Lecture XXVI History of eloquence continued - Roman eloquence - Cicero - modern eloquence 276
Lecture XXVII Diferent kinds of public speaking - eloquence of popular assemblies - extracts from Demosthenes 288
Lecture XXVIII Eloquence of the bar - analysis of Cicero's Oration for Cluentius 302
Lecture XXIX Eloquence of the pulpit 316
Lecture XXX Critical examination of a sermon of Bishop Atterbury's 330
Lecture XXXI Conduct of a discourse in all its parts - introduction - division - narration and explication 344
Lecture XXXII Conduct of a discourse - the argumentative part - the pathetic part - the peroration 356
Lecture XXXIII Pronunciation, or delivery 368
Lecture XXXIV Means of improving in eloquence 380
Lecture XXXV Comparative merit of the Antients and the moderns - historical writing 390
Lecture XXXVI Historical writing 402
Lecture XXXVII Philosophical writing - dialogue - epistolary writing - fictitious history 414
Lecture XXXVIII Nature of poetry - its origin and progress - versification 425
Lecture XXXIX Pastoral poetry - lyric poetry 438
Lecture XL Didactic poetry - descriptive poetry 453
Lecture XLI The poetry of the Hebrews 467
Lecture XLII Epic poetry 478
Lecture XLIII Homer's Iliad and Odyssey - Virgil's Aeneid 489
Lecture XLIV Lucan's Pharsalia - Tasso's Jerusalem - Camoen's Lusiad - Fenelon's Telemachus - Voltaire's Henriade - Milton's Paradise lost 501
Lecture XLV Dramatic poetry - tragedy 515
Lecture XLVI Tragedy - Greek - French - English tragedy 528
Lecture XLVII Comedy - Greek and Roman - French - English comedy 542
Appendix of contemporary versions of Blair's Greek 557
Bibliography of works by and about Hugh Blair 561
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