Leftover Salmon

Leftover Salmon

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by Leftover Salmon
     
 

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Colorado's Leftover Salmon have spent the majority of their career basking in the herbal-infused glow of the jam band circuit. While their devoted fans may indeed celebrate the often-polarizing "hippie" aesthetic, the band has undergone enough significant changes in the last few years to warrant a mild reconsideration of the moniker.

Overview

Colorado's Leftover Salmon have spent the majority of their career basking in the herbal-infused glow of the jam band circuit. While their devoted fans may indeed celebrate the often-polarizing "hippie" aesthetic, the band has undergone enough significant changes in the last few years to warrant a mild reconsideration of the moniker. The Grateful Dead seal of approval has marred and helped the group, winning them packed houses and prime festival slots while causing some to write them off as purveyors of collegiate bong-passing and disposable noodling. This is both true and false, mostly the latter as shown by their self-titled, sixth full-length -- not including the hundreds of bootlegs -- record. Judging by their last two releases, the one-off collaboration with Cracker, O Cracker, Where Art Thou?, and the well-received, star-studded Nashville Sessions, their bluegrass leanings have only intensified. Produced by frequent collaborator and Little Feat keyboardist Bill Payne, the band delivers 11 tracks of solid newgrass that occasionally cross over into folk and blues. Twenty-one-year-old newcomer and Béla Fleck protégé Noam Pikelny adds some serious heat to the mix, especially on the instrumental "Lincoln at Nevada." Like the early work of John McEuen and Martin Simpson, he's technically sharp as well as creative, and his enthusiasm carries much of the record, providing "one-man band," multi-talented Drew Emmitt with a little less to worry about. They sound more like Ricky Skaggs & Kentucky Thunder now than they do any of their grassroots contemporaries, and that bodes well for their future. While no new ground within the genre is broken, Leftover Salmon remain one of the more talented (and tolerable) acts associated with the jam band scene.

Product Details

Release Date:
03/23/2004
Label:
Compendia
UPC:
0015095570420
catalogNumber:
5704

Tracks

Album Credits

Performance Credits

Leftover Salmon   Primary Artist
Bill Payne   Piano,Guest Appearance
Drew Emmitt   Fiddle,Mandolin,Electric Guitar,Vocals,Vocal Harmony
Vince Herman   Acoustic Guitar,Rhythm Guitar,Vocals,Guitar (Nylon String),Vocal Harmony
K.C. Groves   Vocal Harmony,Guest Appearance
Bill McKay   Organ,Piano,Vocals,Wurlitzer,Vocal Harmony
Greg Garrison   Electric Bass,Vocals,Acoustic Bass,Vocal Harmony
Noam Pikelny   Acoustic Guitar,Banjo,Electric Banjo
Jose Martinez   Percussion,Drums

Technical Credits

Jim Messina   Composer
Jimmy LaFave   Composer
Bill Payne   Producer
Alan Thornhill   Composer
James Tuttle   Engineer
Drew Emmitt   Composer
Vince Herman   Composer
Jim Page   Composer
Erick Anderson   Artwork
Bill McKay   Composer
Greg Garrison   Composer
Noam Pikelny   Composer

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Leftover Salmon 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
A decade into their existence, this reformulated hippie-newgrass-band finds themselves more given to their bluegrass roots than to the neo-hippie jam-band aesthetic with which they're often identified. On their latest disc, their sixth studio effort, they play with more of the authority of a bluegrass band than the exploratory feel of a band reliant on festival ticket sales rather than record distribution. ¶ The opener, "Down at the Hollow," is a complete statement of the band's ethos. The high-lonesome vocal flies atop a potent mix of banjo and mandolin, but with an edging of piano and organ that expands on the typical bluegrass format. "Mountain Top" stretches even further, with a joyous second-line beat supporting the sort of warmth once delivered by '70s country-rock acts like the Ozark Mountain Daredevils. "Delta Queen" pushes even further towards soul and blues, with an organ-backed track reminiscent of The Band. The tracks get jammier towards the end of the disc, with "Whispering Waters" stretching to nearly nine minutes (including a jazzy instrumental interlude), and "Just Keep Walkin" taking on a heavy blues vibe. ¶ Throughout the album the band's instrumental chops are in fine form. Noam Pikelny (a young protégé of Bela Fleck) provides superb banjo playing on the opener, as well as the instrumental, "Lincoln at Nevada." The ensemble playing (no doubt tuned over countless live performances) is complex, yet effortless. Everyone plays with the sort of tightness one would expect from a bluegrass band, but with flourishes that speak of broader vistas. Bluegrass and country tunes mingle smoothly with folk, Cajun and jazz influences. ¶ Bluegrass, folk and country-rock fans who might have turned away from Leftover Salmon's jam-band reputation would do well to check out this superbly musical, highly focused album.