Lefty: An American Odyssey

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Overview

A baseball legend distinguished by his competitive nature, quick wit, and generous spirit, Lefty Gomez was one of a kind. Told for the first time, this is his remarkable story.
 
Born to a small-town California ranching family, the youngest of eight, Vernon “Lefty” Gomez rode his powerful arm and jocular personality right across America to the dugout of the New York Yankees. Lefty baffled hitters with his blazing fastball, establishing ...
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Overview

A baseball legend distinguished by his competitive nature, quick wit, and generous spirit, Lefty Gomez was one of a kind. Told for the first time, this is his remarkable story.
 
Born to a small-town California ranching family, the youngest of eight, Vernon “Lefty” Gomez rode his powerful arm and jocular personality right across America to the dugout of the New York Yankees. Lefty baffled hitters with his blazing fastball, establishing himself as the team’s ace. He vacationed with Babe Ruth, served as Joe DiMaggio’s confidant, and consoled Lou Gehrig the day the “Iron Horse” removed himself from the lineup. He started and won the first-ever All-Star Game, was the first pitcher to make the cover of Time magazine, and barnstormed Japan as part of Major League Baseball’s grand ambassadorial tour in 1934. Away from the diamond, Lefty played the big-city bon vivant, marrying Broadway star June O’Dea and hobnobbing with a who’s who of celebrities, including George Gershwin, Jack Dempsey, Ernest Hemingway, Marilyn Monroe, George M. Cohan, and James Michener. He even scored a private audience with the pope.
 
And even when his pro ball career was done, Lefty wasn’t. He became a national representative for Wilson Sporting Goods, logging over 100,000 miles a year, spreading the word about America’s favorite game, and touching thousands of lives. In 1972 he was inducted into the National Baseball Hall of Fame. Three baseball fields are named for him, and to this day the top honor bestowed each year by the American Baseball Coaches Association is the Lefty Gomez Award.
 
Now, drawing on countless conversations with Lefty, interweaving more than three hundred interviews conducted with his family, friends, competitors, and teammates over the course of a decade, and revealing candid photos, documents, and film clips—many never shown publicly—his daughter Vernona Gomez and her award-winning co-author Lawrence Goldstone vividly re-create the life and adventures of the irreverent southpaw fondly dubbed “El Señor Goofy.”
 
“I’d rather be lucky than good,” Lefty Gomez once quipped—one of many classic one-liners documented here. In the end he was both. A star-studded romp through baseball’s most glorious seasons and America’s most glamorous years, Lefty is at once a long-overdue reminder of a pitcher’s greatness and a heartwarming celebration of a life well-lived.
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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Vernon “Lefty” Gomez was a stalwart pitcher for the dominant New York Yankee teams of the 1930s. The son of an illiterate rancher from rural California adapted quickly to the city and was “named to New York’s best-dressed list” within two years of joining the Yankees. Although overshadowed by the offensive juggernauts of teammates Babe Ruth, Lou Gehrig, and Joe DiMaggio, Gomez was a significant factor in the Yankees’ success. He was the American League’s starting pitcher in five of the first seven All-Star games and was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1972. His daughter, Vernona, relies on testimonials from relatives, friends, teammates, and Lefty himself to produce an anecdotal biography of the man known as “El Goofo.” While paying homage to her father, she doesn’t shy from the darker periods such as her parents highly publicized separation and Lefty’s later bout with alcoholism. Coauthor Goldstone (The Anatomy of Deception) blends the abundant testimonials with biographical data, baseball lore and history, and American history to provide a glimpse of a bygone era through Gomez’s life. Photos. (May)
Library Journal
The quirky and upbeat Hall of Fame pitcher Lefty Gomez was a fan favorite on the 1930–42 Yankees that also featured Lou Gehrig, Joe DiMaggio and Babe Ruth. His daughter, with Goldstone (Inherently Unequal: The Betrayal of Equal Rights by the Supreme Court, 1865-1903), offers a well-written and comprehensive though oddly impersonal story of Gomez's life from his challenging upbringing through his long baseball career, his close friendship with the Bambino, his time as a manager in South America, and his volatile marriage to a headstrong Broadway actress, the author's mother. Gomez was famous for his quips and his ease with his public life, handling celebrity and a tabloid presence with grace. Although his daughter keeps her distance in this biography (e.g., no family lore or mention of him as "Dad"), it is recommended to all golden age baseball fans and anyone seeking insight into life as a Depression-era baseball celebrity.—D.K.
Kirkus Reviews
A veteran author teams with the daughter of Vernon "Lefty" Gomez (1908–1989) for a biography of the Yankee legend. One of the game's singular personalities and greatest big-game pitchers, Lefty Gomez entered the Hall of Fame in 1972. In a career cut short by injuries, he nevertheless managed to win 20 games four times, lead the league three times in strikeouts and shutouts and twice in ERA. A fierce competitor, he started and won six of seven World Series games (while losing none), and three of four All-Star games. Daughter Gomez and Goldstone (Inherently Unequal: The Betrayal of Equal Rights by the Supreme Court, 1865–1903, 2011, etc.) dutifully cover the baseball heroics, from Lefty's California boyhood, the town teams and semi-pro ball, his signing with the San Francisco Seals and his storied Yankee career. The narrative's chief delight, though, is the treatment of Lefty the character. For his pranks, eccentricities and high-spirited antics, he acquired the nickname "El Goofo," but the moniker belied a steady character that led teammates to confide in him, a keen native intelligence and ready wit. Sure, he once famously held up a World Series game as he contemplated a passing airplane, but this same man perfectly captured the fearsome slugger Jimmie Foxx by remarking, "He has muscles in his hair." Thanks partly to his marriage to showgirl June O'Dea and his post-playing career as sales rep and goodwill ambassador for Wilson Sporting Goods, Lefty traveled widely and appears to have hung with an endless list of famous friends: sitting in with bandleader Eddy Duchin, chumming with James Michener, dining with Hemingway, fishing with Ted Williams, playing cards with the Babe. Though this largely adoring treatment acknowledges some dark passages--a near-divorce, a midlife bout with alcoholism, the motorcycle death of a beloved son--the overwhelming impression is of a crowded, accomplished life exuberantly lived. An amiable portrait of a baseball great--like Yogi Berra, Dizzy Dean and Satchel Paige--whose outsized personality looms even larger than his considerable athletic achievements.
From the Publisher
“An intimate portrait of a man whose life off the field was equally as captivating as his unparalleled baseball career.”—Yankees Magazine  
 
“His story transcends sports and gives us a much-needed lesson in grit and grace.”—Jon Meacham
 
“A loving and beautifully written tribute . . . Be prepared to be transformed, and to discover stars who were stars in an age when that word really meant something.”—Mike Greenberg, co-host of ESPN’s Mike and Mike in the Morning
 
“An amiable portrait of a baseball great—like Yogi Berra, Dizzy Dean and Satchel Paige—whose outsized personality looms even larger than his considerable athletic achievements.”—Kirkus Reviews
 
“Endearing for its vivid snapshots of long-lost diamonds and the colorful players who inhabited them.”—Austin American-Statesman
 
“Filled with stories that will bring joy to baseball fans.”—The Roanoke Times
 
“A charming story.”—Bookreporter
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780345526489
  • Publisher: Random House Publishing Group
  • Publication date: 5/15/2012
  • Pages: 416
  • Product dimensions: 6.28 (w) x 9.32 (h) x 1.25 (d)

Meet the Author

Vernona Gomez, a concert pianist, is the daughter of Lefty Gomez.
 
Lawrence Goldstone is the author or co-author of thirteen books of fiction and nonfiction. One of his novels won a New American Writing Award, another was a New York Times notable mystery. His articles, reviews, and opinion pieces have appeared in The Boston Globe, Los Angeles Times, Chicago Tribune, and other periodicals. He has appeared on many TV and radio shows, and his work has been profiled in The New York Times, The Toronto Star, Salon, and Slate, among others. He lives in Fairfield, Connecticut, with his wife and daughter.
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Read an Excerpt

Chapter 1
The Cowboy’s Son

Vernon Gomez was born on November 26, 1908, at his family’s homestead in Rodeo, California, on the south coast of San Pablo Bay, northeast of San Francisco. “Five hundred people if you counted the cows,” he would say. “Rodeo was a town with two local trains, one comin’ and one goin’. Down by the depot, there was a haystack close to the train tracks. If we rode the express, we jumped into it as the train passed through.”
Although he was later referred to in the New York press as “the lanky Castilian” or “the singular senõr,” Lefty’s heritage was in many ways more quintessentially American than that of any newspaperman who wrote about him. Lefty’s paternal grandfather had sunk roots in California pastureland courtesy of that most American of events, the Civil War. While California might not have been the scene of epic battles between blue and gray, throughout the war the navies of both sides did engage in an ongoing series of skirmishes just off the Pacific coast. Confederate raiders prowled the San Francisco coastline trying to disrupt the flow of commerce, while Union warships tried to head them off and keep the sea-lanes -open.
The stakes for a port far removed from Antietam and Gettysburg were surprisingly high. By the early 1860s, San Francisco had been transformed from the sleepy mission settlement of the 1830s into America’s most prominent boomtown, swelled to bursting by the throngs who had come west either to search for gold or to reap the immense profits engendered by those who did. Shipments of wheat, constantly in demand in Europe, or kerosene, a new fuel for illumination derived from petroleum, left by the hour in the holds of clipper ships to begin the torturous journey around the Horn, their crews often supplemented by sailors who had chosen the wrong drinking companions along the Barbary Coast. A steady stream of whaling vessels sailed for the Bering -Sea.
With the explosion of enterprise, trading vessels from the Americas, Europe, and the Pacific flocked to San Francisco. The captain of one of those vessels, a Spaniard named Juan Gomez, arrived in 1862, his ship laden with fine leather goods to satisfy the appetites of the West’s nouveau riche. After selling his cargo, he loaded his ship with wheat for the return trip. Just after he embarked, Juan Gomez’s ship was shot out from under him, torched to the waterline by a Confederate privateer. Juan was rescued but his cargo was -lost.
Juan did not sail again. Instead, he sent for his Portuguese wife, Rita, to join him in California with their -seven--year--old son, Juan Enrique. Rita arrived to find that her husband had turned in his compass and sextant to try his hand at growing wheat and raising horses on a 150--acre ranch in El Sobrante in the Pinole Valley. Rita and Juan enrolled their son in a local school, then set to pioneering. In late 1863, the couple had a second son, Francisco, who was christened in the San Bautista mission, a -native--born American. Francisco would not be sent to school but would remain home to help on the ranch. An illiterate son, it was then believed, would be less likely to up and leave for another profession, and so only the eldest received a formal education. Francisco grew up with a keen intelligence and prodigious memory, but completely unlettered. By early adulthood, he was fluent in three languages, Spanish, Portuguese, and -En-glish, though he was unable to sign his name in any of them. But he had learned roping from the Mexican vaqueros who worked the ranches and earned the moniker “Coyote” as a slick predator with a lasso in his -hand.
Coyote had not been made to toil his life away in a wheat field. He dreamed, as did many boys in the 1870s, of -driv-ing longhorns up the Great Western Trail from Bandera, Texas, to the railhead at Dodge City, Kansas. In 1879, only fifteen years old, Coyote did just that. He drifted east to Nevada, then Texas, ranch to ranch, breaking horses. Then for ten years he rode with the cowboys from Oklahoma to Montana, enduring dust, stampedes, broiling days and frigid nights, long hours in the saddle, and the constant threat of attack from hostile tribes. By his -mid--twenties, Coyote had grown into a hardened trail hand, expert at reading tracks and understanding the instincts of the cattle and horses, a master at throwing loops, branding calves, breaking horses, running the fall roundup, and moving cattle to -market.
But the open range was disappearing. Cowboys were sometimes forced to avoid -shotgun--wielding homesteaders none too keen to watch thousands of cattle tromp across their fields. -Barbed--wire fences increasingly blocked the path of the herds. In 1890, Coyote learned that his father had died of a heart attack. He returned home to help his two younger brothers, Carlos and Manuel, run the El Sobrante ranch. He would never ride the trail -again.
But the homecoming did have its -advantages.
One of Coyote’s responsibilities was to bring the cash crops to the grain warehouses on the Pinole waterfront. Wheat, barley, and oats from the Pinole Valley were then shipped to Port Costa, where the European ships were -docked.
The Gomez farm sold to the area’s most prominent broker, Bernardo Fernandez. In 1892, Fernandez hired a new bookkeeper. Her name was Lizzie Herring, a recent arrival from San Francisco. There, Lizzie had performed similar duties for the postmaster general, B. F. McKinley, whose brother William would that year be elected governor of Ohio and, four years afterward, president of the United -States.
Lizzie was a -sixth--generation American of -Welsh--Irish descent; her grandparents had struck out decades earlier in search of winter sun, free land, and an escape from Bleeding Kansas, where Lizzie’s -great--uncle Franklin had been murdered with a Bowie knife for opposing slavery. In Independence, Missouri, her grandfather John B. P. Williams had purchased a Conestoga wagon and then set out in 1857 on the Oregon Trail with his wife, Lucinda, a son, and three daughters. The family crossed the Rockies at Fort Hall in Idaho, took a cutoff to the Humboldt River in northern Nevada, and finally made their way through a pass in the Sierra Nevada range to Old Shasta in -California.
Each of John B. P.’s daughters married a pioneer; one of them, Mary Jane, wed a logger named Elias Herring. Lizzie was born in 1870 in Bodega Township, near the Russian River, in redwood country. Five years later, her parents were dead. Lizzie was raised by an aunt and sent to school; as an adult, she journeyed south to San Francisco. Another aunt moved north, settling in Oregon, then journeyed farther still, not stopping until her family reached the salmon fisheries in Homer, Alaska, where they started a -cannery.
Lizzie described what happened one fall afternoon at the Fernandez warehouse. “I was sitting behind the counter on a stool, my head bent over a bookkeeping ledger as I tallied up the bales of hay and sacks of wheat that the ranchers had brought in from the valley. I heard the staccato of -high--heeled boots on the wooden floor. I looked up at the cowboy and met a pair of pale blue eyes under a battered broad-brimmed hat. He pulled off the hat and held it in his -hand.
“ ‘Coyote’s the name. Four hundred bushels of wheat, two hundred hay.’ Having said that, he stood waiting for his cash. I handed him the money, then asked him to sign his name to the -receipt.
“He gave me a slow grin. ‘I spell it with an X.’ He made his mark on the paper, laid the receipt on the counter, said, ‘Thank you, ma’am,’ then turned on his heel and walked out the door. Within minutes, he was back inside. ‘Miss Lizzie, ain’t it?’ When I said yes, he smiled -again.
“ ‘Seein’ as how I’m goin’ to the square, would you want to be goin’ with me to the Saturday dance?’
“ ‘I’d like that fine, Coyote.’ ”
Coyote Gomez, the -hard--bitten, taciturn cowboy, married Lizzie Herring, the shy young bookkeeper, in August 1893. For Coyote, Lizzie, who read -En-glish novels purely for enjoyment, represented a sophistication he had never before encountered. After their marriage, the couple moved to the El Sobrante ranch that Coyote was now running for his mother. But Rita had a tyrannical streak and thought Lizzie “soft,” not the pioneer woman her son should have married. When Lizzie became pregnant, Rita refused to even discuss hiring a midwife to help with the delivery. Childbirth was “women’s work,” Rita insisted; a midwife was an affectation. Lizzie would give birth alone, as Rita had seven times before -her.
In rural California in 1894 a -mother--in--law could make such a demand stick, especially a -mother--in--law in whose home you were living. So in solitude Lizzie delivered her child, a son, whom she and Coyote named Earl. Lizzie cut and knotted the umbilical cord herself, then tended to the newborn without help, as Rita had done. The next year another son was born, Milfred, named, as had been Earl, for a character in one of Lizzie’s favorite -En-glish novels. Lizzie birthed Milfred alone as -well.
A third child, Albert, was born on Christmas Eve, 1896, while Coyote was in Nevada selling horses at a saddle stock auction. Albert was a month premature and there were immediate problems. The baby had entered the birth canal feetfirst, and midway through the delivery his arms and head became trapped. After the baby was out, Lizzie began to bleed profusely. She feared she might faint from loss of blood. She yelled for help, but Rita either -couldn’t hear or -wouldn’t respond. Lizzie flailed about for something she could use to tie off the umbilical cord. All that was available was a white bib lying on the table, which Milfred had worn when Lizzie fed him breakfast that morning. She ripped off the strings, used them to tie off the cord, then stanched her own -bleeding.
Days later, Albert grew ill. On New Year’s Eve, 1896, he went into convulsions and died. Rita had refused to call a doctor. Albert, it was later determined, had contracted an infection from the contaminated bib strings. Lizzie had carried her child for nine months, and now he was dead by her own hand. She never ceased blaming herself for Albert’s death, but she also knew full well that if a doctor or midwife had been present, the boy would have -lived.
Coyote returned home from Nevada shortly after New Year’s, in time, he thought, for his baby’s arrival. Lizzie met him at the door. She told him his son had already been born and was already buried. Then she issued an ultimatum. “Never again. It’s your mother or me. I’m leaving.” Coyote walked to the barn, hitched the horses to the spring wagon, then left with his wife, two boys, and meager savings. They stopped at Rodeo, a dusty backwater about three miles up the coast where land was cheap. Coyote and Lizzie placed a small down payment on a $450 plot of land and set to building a house. Rita remained in Pinole on her 150 acres of ranchland, stubborn and uncompromising. In 1906, the state of California appropriated all but fifteen acres of her land under eminent domain to make way for the San Pablo Dam Reservoir. Rita fought the order in court, but the state prevailed. Once the “American bandits” had taken her land, Rita vowed never again to speak another word of -En-glish, nor allow it to be spoken in her home. She kept that vow until the day she -died.
Coyote and Lizzie had four more children in the next six years: Lloyd, Irene, Cecil, and Gladys. A doctor helped with each delivery. Then, on November 26, 1908, the last of their children was born. They named him Vernon -Louis.

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Table of Contents

Preface ix

Prologue xv

Part I "American's pastime for barefoot Boys"

1 The Cowboy's Son 3

2 "An Aberrant Deviation in the Evolutionary process" 9

3 "Pick a spot, make a diamond" 21

4 "I'd go Anywhere to pitch" 27

5 "About as skinny as you can get and still be living" 35

6 "His Name's Gomez Go warm him up" 43

7 "I had to stop gomez" 50

8 Ping, babe, duster, sloppy and lefty 59

9 Class d baseball seven days a week 65

10 Birdlegs and walter the great 72

11 A Death in new york 81

12 Hollywood, Goat's milk, and spinach 89

Part 2 "What do you think of my boy vernon now?"

13 "I Don't talk to bushers" 95

14 The Doctor and the dictator 109

15 June in June 120

16 A Pitcher's pitch 135

17 "The Greatest thrill of my career" 143

18 "No Lipstick lefty" 153

19 Pitzy and fung 156

20 Game of the century 166

21 For want of an inning 170

22 Let loose to run around the world 180

23 "The yankees pay you eve when you lose?" 193

24 "He Can't hit it, if i don't tgriw it" 204

25 Farewell to rodeo 215

26 June in january... And february 226

27 The not-so-perfect crime 232

28 Immortality, achieved and denied 246

29 "You don't tell june she can't do something" 257

30 "They'll have to cut the uniform off me" 265

31 Eighty innings 277

Part 3 "When i married lefty, I married Baseball"

32 "You could see it was gone" 285

33 Field general 296

34 "Never Measure a Player when he's gone 0 For 4" 310

35 "I only do what i like to do" 320

36 "The Best Possible sports experience for every child who has desire to play" 327

37 "My own damn fault" 331

38 Winning friends and influencing people for the united states on ten dollars a day 335

39 "You don't have to shovel rain" 339

40 Something you can only hope for 345

41 Duane 351

42 "We're going to miss lefty" 357

Epilogue 372

Acknowledgements 377

Index 383

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 7 )
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Sort by: Showing all of 7 Customer Reviews
  • Posted July 24, 2012

    This is a great story about the rewards of perserverence and tal

    This is a great story about the rewards of perserverence and talent. This guy had a huge heart and loved his fans just as much as they loved him. He was gifted with a blazing fastball. It's a shame there were no radar guns in those days to measure the speed.

    Tocay's ball players would do well to follow Lefty's lead when it comes to dedication to the game and the people who love baseball.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted July 24, 2012

    more from this reviewer

    Must read for any true baseball fan!

    This is a fantastic story about Lefty Gomez, written by his daughter and L.Goldstone (who is not a ghost writer - his name appears on the book!). The pages are filled with humor and honesty as they describe Lefty's life from his humble beginnings in Rodeo, CA to his fame as a Hall of Fame pitcher for the NY Yankees. It tells the story also of how baseball progressed from its time during the depression. Life was not easy for minor leaguers. Stories, one-liners, and anecdotes are plentiful. There are insights into the personalities of names we all recognize as synonymous with baseball and Yankees - e.g. DiMaggio, Rizzuto. It is written from first-hand knowledge, and with great feeling. Anyone who loves baseball will love this book...and anyone who doesn't love baseball will surely become a fan! Read it!

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 27, 2012

    I loved this book! I'd heard tales of this team of baseball le

    I loved this book! I'd heard tales of this team of baseball legends, but when I read this book, they seemed to come alive. Lefty was sometimes the glue that brought the team together. Often his quips were the tension relievers for a team of similarly driven players, Lou Gehrig, Joe DiMaggio and the Babe. That he could hold off the opposing teams with his stinging fastball made his contribution to Yankee wins crucial as well. It's easy to see why James Michener thought Lefty's story would have universal appeal. (I''m a Red Sox fan, after all.) There's plenty of drama in this book, including his marriage to a Broadway star June O'Day, and celebrity friends. A must read!!!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted August 6, 2013

    Baseball has had a lot of "strikeouts" with the public

    Baseball has had a lot of "strikeouts" with the public over the last 20 years...from player strikes to player drug use.  The latest being the arrogance of A-Rod (although I would use a different "A" word for him).  But this story of baseball and one of baseball's best pitchers is fascinating, informative, heart warming and (seeing as it is written by Lefty's daughter) truthful story.  She tells the whole truth and nothing but the truth about all the people in her father's life.  What 's just as important is her reporting about the techniques, history and details of playing the game itself.  A truly excellent read!

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  • Posted July 19, 2012

    A Light biography

    This is a book about Lefty Gomez's life, family,marriage, and baseball career in that order. It is short on anecdotes and baseball memories or tales. It's a light speedread written by his daughter and a ghostwritter.

    0 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 12, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted August 1, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

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