Legal Bases CL

Overview

Abrams examines such issues as drug use and gambling, enforcement of contracts, and the rights of owners and managers. The stories he tells are not limited to his official lineup, but include appearances by a host of other characters -- from baseball magnate Albert Spaulding and New York Knickerbocker Alexander Joy Cartwright to 'Acting Commissioner' Bud Selig and Jackie Robinson. And Abrams does not limit himself to the history of baseball and the legal process but also speculates on the implications of the 1996...
See more details below
Available through our Marketplace sellers.
Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (10) from $2.70   
  • New (3) from $50.00   
  • Used (7) from $2.70   
Close
Sort by
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Note: Marketplace items are not eligible for any BN.com coupons and promotions
$50.00
Seller since 2010

Feedback rating:

(15)

Condition:

New — never opened or used in original packaging.

Like New — packaging may have been opened. A "Like New" item is suitable to give as a gift.

Very Good — may have minor signs of wear on packaging but item works perfectly and has no damage.

Good — item is in good condition but packaging may have signs of shelf wear/aging or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Acceptable — item is in working order but may show signs of wear such as scratches or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Used — An item that has been opened and may show signs of wear. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Refurbished — A used item that has been renewed or updated and verified to be in proper working condition. Not necessarily completed by the original manufacturer.

New
1566395992 Temple University Press; Philadelphia, 1998. Hardcover. First edition. Fine in a Fine Dustwrapper, NEW. A nice, clean unmarked copy. 8vo[octavo or aprx 6 x 9 inches], ... 226pp. We pack securely and ship daily w/delivery confirmation on every book. The picture on the listing page is of the actual book for sale. Additional Scan(s) are available for any item, please inquire. Read more Show Less

Ships from: North Scituate, RI

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
$80.00
Seller since 2014

Feedback rating:

(147)

Condition: New
Brand new.

Ships from: acton, MA

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
$119.49
Seller since 2014

Feedback rating:

(265)

Condition: New
Brand New Item.

Ships from: Chatham, NJ

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Close
Sort by
Sending request ...

Overview

Abrams examines such issues as drug use and gambling, enforcement of contracts, and the rights of owners and managers. The stories he tells are not limited to his official lineup, but include appearances by a host of other characters -- from baseball magnate Albert Spaulding and New York Knickerbocker Alexander Joy Cartwright to 'Acting Commissioner' Bud Selig and Jackie Robinson. And Abrams does not limit himself to the history of baseball and the legal process but also speculates on the implications of the 1996 collective bargaining agreement and those other issues -- like intellectual property, eminent domain, and gender equity -- that may provide the all-star baseball law stories of the future.
Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Allen D. Boyer
Wearing lightly his notable learning, Abrams writes with verve and intelligence. -- New York Times Book Review
Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
As much as the purist might insist that the game itself is the thing, not the salaries, contracts and cost overruns on new stadiums, a rounded knowledge of the game is incomplete without considering baseball as a business. As dean of Rutgers Law School, baseball salary arbitrator and sincere grassroots fan, few have Abrams' qualifications for writing on baseball and the law. The book is organized around nine men and one woman who played pivotal roles in its history. They constitute our 'All-Star Baseball Law Team.' The 'team' (apparently the 10th player is justified by the designated hitter rule) is chosen to illustrate important principles of baseball and law dating from the 19th century (John Montgomery Ward) through the reserve clause challenge (Curt Flood) to baseball's crimes (Pete Rose). Abrams claims that the importance of Judge Kenesaw Mountain Landis was too great to fit in just a chapter, but many readers will still wish for more on the man who shaped the business of baseball more than any other single individual. The book focuses almost entirely on the U.S. majors, though it would have been interesting to see more on international baseball or the minor leagues (e.g., on the recent Professional Baseball Agreement that dictates relations between minor and major league baseball or on minor league umpire Pam Postema). The writing is a bit dry and overly detailed, but the book will serve as a valuable reference for the ardent baseball student.
Library Journal
Abrams, Dean of Rutgers Law School and a major league baseball salary arbitrator, has written a scholarly study of a topic that seems so appropriate for our times, baseball litigation. Key people and historic incidents are highlighted in each chapter, including Curt Flood's fight against the reserve system, Marvin Miller and collective bargaining, the baseball strike of 1994-95, and more.
Library Journal
Abrams, Dean of Rutgers Law School and a major league baseball salary arbitrator, has written a scholarly study of a topic that seems so appropriate for our times, baseball litigation. Key people and historic incidents are highlighted in each chapter, including Curt Flood's fight against the reserve system, Marvin Miller and collective bargaining, the baseball strike of 1994-95, and more.
Booknews
Illuminates the sometimes uproarious, sometimes ignominious relationship between law and baseball, looking at key personalities and concepts behind baseball's antitrust exemption, collective bargaining, and labor arbitration, and discussing drug use and gambling, enforcement of contracts, and the rights of owners and managers. Speculates on the implications of the 1996 collective bargaining agreement, and ponders emerging issues such as intellectual property, eminent domain, and gender equity. Annotation c. by Book News, Inc., Portland, Or.
Kirkus Reviews
A prominent sports-law professor (Rutgers University) and baseball-salary arbitrator explains the obvious and not-so-obvious reasons why baseball players and team owners seem to spend more time arguing before judges than before field umpires. Abrams asserts that 'if baseball is the heart of America, the legal process provides the sinews that hold it in place.' Coming from a sports-law practitioner and educator, such a pronouncement might seem both simplistic and self-serving. However, going over the game's history, from its inception in the mid-19th century to the present, Abrams convincingly illustrates why the business of baseball has supplanted the game itself in the American limelight. To explain the relationship between law and baseball, the author focuses on nine men and one woman who had pivotal roles in the game's history—a group of players, owners, and litigators Abrams calls the 'All-Star Baseball Law Team.' Using these individuals' actions and related events, he discusses several major themes: John Montgomery Ward's clashes with National League team owners over the formation of a players' union at the end of the 19th century; the Curt Flood case against baseball's reserve clause and its exemption from federal anti-trust regulations in the 1970s; Pete Rose and the issues of jurisdiction; baseball executives' struggles with the commissioner's office over a vague yet binding mandate to act on behalf of 'the best interests of baseball.' Abrams is astute and unflinching in his judgments, yet shows admirable balance (although he doesn't shy away from depicting how management's arrogance and inability to organize in any but a collusive manner has contributed to their poorpublic image and unsuccessful litigative record). Also, he obligingly explains many terms often used but seldom understood (in relation to baseball), and makes clear many subtle distinctions, such as that between arbitration and mediation. Interesting and illustrative, this is a book every thinking sports fan should read.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781566395991
  • Publisher: Temple University Press
  • Publication date: 2/28/1998
  • Pages: 226
  • Product dimensions: 6.32 (w) x 9.34 (h) x 0.87 (d)

Table of Contents

Preface
Introduction 1
1 The Legal Process at the Birth of Baseball 7
2 The Enforcement of Contracts 27
3 Baseball's Antitrust Exemption 43
4 Collective Bargaining 71
5 The Owners and the Commissioner 91
6 Labor Arbitration and the End of the Reserve System 115
7 The Collusion Cases 135
8 The Crimes of Baseball 151
9 Baseball's Labor Wars of the 1990s 173
Conclusion 201
Notes 207
Bibliography 213
Index 217
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)