The Legend of Sleepy Hollow and Rip Van Winkle

( 4 )

Overview

Ichabod Crane faces the terror of the Headless Horseman, and Rip Van Winkle rises from a 20-year sleep to find a world vastly changed in these two delightful classics of American literature. Complete and unabridged, newly reset in easy-to-read type, with 6 new full-page illustrations.

In the first of these stories from the Catskill Mountains, a superstitious schoolmaster encounters a headless horseman; in the second, a man sleeps ...

See more details below
Paperback
$3.00
BN.com price

Pick Up In Store

Reserve and pick up in 60 minutes at your local store

Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (77) from $1.99   
  • New (13) from $1.99   
  • Used (64) from $1.99   
Note: Kids' Club Eligible. See More Details.

Overview

Ichabod Crane faces the terror of the Headless Horseman, and Rip Van Winkle rises from a 20-year sleep to find a world vastly changed in these two delightful classics of American literature. Complete and unabridged, newly reset in easy-to-read type, with 6 new full-page illustrations.

In the first of these stories from the Catskill Mountains, a superstitious schoolmaster encounters a headless horseman; in the second, a man sleeps for twenty years, waking to a much-changed world.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
THE LEGEND OF SLEEPY HOLLOW Washington Irving, illus. by Michael Garland. Boyds Mills, $8.95 ISBN 1-56397-605-6. Full-page oil paintings illustrate this unabridged edition of the classic spine-tingler. All ages. (Sept.)
Children's Literature - Susie Wilde
Kelley makes a significant contribution to picture books for young adults with his skillful rendition of Irving's classic The Legend of Sleepy Hallow. Kelley drew his inspiration from the painters of the late 18th century. He uses style, color and light to reflect the tones of the Flemish masters and revive the Hudson Valley life of the early Dutch settlers. Green predominates, giving a woodsy feel while creating a strong sense of setting and time. Kelley also adopts the illustrative vision of the 1700's where he depicts a horse galloping with front and back legs extended, as they were in the period (artists didn't have photography to show them that a horse doesn't gallop that way). All these things add to the feeling of the period.
School Library Journal
Gr 5-8-- An unabridged version of the classic tale of Ichabod Crane, his affection for the wealthy and beautiful Katrina Van Tassel, and his confrontation with the Headless Horseman. Despite Irving's outmoded narrative style, this is still an excellent ghost story that combines appropriate amounts of humor and terror while integrating Germanic legend with New England folklore, specifically that of New York State. Garland's realistic oil paintings are either portraitures or landscapes. The former are reminiscent of Barry Moser's work, while the latter resemble those by Thomas Locker. While these illustrations act as a sophisticated balance to Irving's wordy narrative, they do not consistently evoke the mood of Arthur Rackham's interpretation (1990). In her retelling for younger children (1987, both Morrow), Diane Wolkstein avoids the African-American stereotypes that Irving used for ``comic relief'' and concentrates on telling a good story, eliminating the complicated and archaic language of the period. All in all, this new version is useful where additional copies of the unabridged edition are needed. --Andrew W. Hunter, Public Library of Charlotte and Mecklenburg, Charlotte, NC
School Library Journal
Gr 7 Up-The Legend of Sleepy Hollow takes place in Tarrytown, and tells the story of schoolmaster, Ichabod Crane, Connecticut native, who comes to teach in a one-room schoolhouse. He becomes the neighborhood song master, reads Cotton Mather, steeps himself in local folklore, and competes with Brom Bones for the affections of Katrina. One afternoon, after being rebuffed by Katrina, he briskly rides off on his landlord's horse, sees an apparition of a headless horseman, and is never seen again in Sleepy Hollow. The townspeople have a myriad of theories concerning his disappearance. Rip Van Winkle is the short tale of a henpecked man who is very much liked by the townspeople, but is a failure as a farmer and family man. He journeys up the mountains one afternoon with his dog and stumbles upon a strangely dressed group of men who offer him a drink that puts him to sleep for 20 years. The world to which he awakens is greatly changed. George Vafiadis provides flawless narration for these tales by Washington Irving. His voice is strong, distinctive, and clear. Students may find this audio version helpful in understanding these tales set in the 18th century. The language is archaic and patronizing to women and blacks, although it is was appropriate to the time. The action takes place after a great deal of description, and middle schoolers may miss the tongue-in-cheek humor. Students may need prompting to listen to these two tales. That said, these classic tales are steeped in atmosphere and reveal a great deal about the social and political history of the time.-Jo-Ann Carhart, East Islip Public Library, NY Copyright 2003 Cahners Business Information.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780486288284
  • Publisher: Dover Publications
  • Publication date: 12/1/1995
  • Series: Dover Children's Thrift Classics Series
  • Pages: 80
  • Sales rank: 370,797
  • Age range: 8 - 11 Years
  • Product dimensions: 5.26 (w) x 8.18 (h) x 0.21 (d)

Meet the Author

Washington Irving, the first American writer to make his living by his profession, was born April 3, 1783. At the age of six he was introduced to his namesake, George Washington. He studied law but then was sent to Europe because of his health and was to spend 17 years abroad. When he was thirty-five his family's business went bankrupt. It was then that he began to support himself by writing. He wrote letters, essays and short fiction. Washington Irving died in 1859.
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 3.5
( 4 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(1)

4 Star

(1)

3 Star

(1)

2 Star

(1)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 4 Customer Reviews
  • Posted January 7, 2014

    2 classics I can cross off my Bucket List *Book source ~ Local

    2 classics I can cross off my Bucket List

    *Book source ~ Local library

    I picked up a few copies of The Legend of Sleepy Hollow at the library because my daughter had to read it for her AP English class. I chose a few copies because I wasn’t sure which one she’d want to read and of the four I read the one with Sleepy Hollow and Rip Van Winkle. My husband decided to read one of the others and my daughter chose yet another. The boys read the last copy, so all the books got some reading love.

    The copy I read is from 1967. It is a large print with illustrations, but there is no ISBN and I can’t find it anywhere online to link this exact copy. Anyway…it’s hard to believe I haven’t read either of these stories. Heard about them, yes. Actually read them, no. I’m not all that big on classics, but I found both of these stories ok. I did enjoy the extra background in both stories as I could only remember the bare bones of each tale. I do wonder what happened to Ichabod Crane though. Did the pumpkin in the face kill him and he was buried out in the woods? Or was he so scared he took off, even without his stuff? As far as Rip Van Winkle goes, no wonder his wife nagged him. He was a lazy worthless guy and his son didn’t fall far from the tree.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted March 10, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    Amazing story, not so amazing illustrations

    The illustrations in the edition leave some realism to be desired, but the story is wonderful for Hudson Valley enthusiasts!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 26, 2000

    Two great tales!

    Two great stories in one! In 'Rip Van Winkle', a man sees the ghosts of Henry Hudson and his men, and falls asleep for 20 years. In 'The Legend Of Sleepy Hallow', a new school-master falls for a women. On Halloween night he get chased by a headless horseman.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 8, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 4 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)