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The Legend of Sleepy Hollow and Rip Van Winkle
     

The Legend of Sleepy Hollow and Rip Van Winkle

3.5 4
by Washington Irving
 

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When Ichabod Crane becomes the new schoolmaster of Sleepy Hollow, he quickly and happily adjusts to the local ways. He delights in the bountiful dinners he's served when visiting the prosperous farms of the region; he enjoys the local yarns and scary legends that fill the firelit evenings of autumn; and he comes to love the idea of marrying Katrina Van Tassel and of

Overview

When Ichabod Crane becomes the new schoolmaster of Sleepy Hollow, he quickly and happily adjusts to the local ways. He delights in the bountiful dinners he's served when visiting the prosperous farms of the region; he enjoys the local yarns and scary legends that fill the firelit evenings of autumn; and he comes to love the idea of marrying Katrina Van Tassel and of one day owning her father's wealth and lands. There's one problem with his plans, though: Brom Bones, the local hero, who decided long ago to wed Katrina himself. And now, to his annoyance, this pasty-faced bookworm named Ichabod is making a serious bid. This droll tale of romantic rivalry climaxes with the appearance of the Headless Horseman. The spirited narration by Glenn Close, radiant illustrations by Robert Van Nutt, and original music by Tim Story capture all the wit, fun, and shivers of this early American tale. In 1988 the audio was honored with a Grammy nomination in the category of best recording for children.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
THE LEGEND OF SLEEPY HOLLOW Washington Irving, illus. by Michael Garland. Boyds Mills, $8.95 ISBN 1-56397-605-6. Full-page oil paintings illustrate this unabridged edition of the classic spine-tingler. All ages. (Sept.)
Children's Literature - Susie Wilde
Kelley makes a significant contribution to picture books for young adults with his skillful rendition of Irving's classic The Legend of Sleepy Hallow. Kelley drew his inspiration from the painters of the late 18th century. He uses style, color and light to reflect the tones of the Flemish masters and revive the Hudson Valley life of the early Dutch settlers. Green predominates, giving a woodsy feel while creating a strong sense of setting and time. Kelley also adopts the illustrative vision of the 1700's where he depicts a horse galloping with front and back legs extended, as they were in the period (artists didn't have photography to show them that a horse doesn't gallop that way). All these things add to the feeling of the period.
School Library Journal
Gr 5-8-- An unabridged version of the classic tale of Ichabod Crane, his affection for the wealthy and beautiful Katrina Van Tassel, and his confrontation with the Headless Horseman. Despite Irving's outmoded narrative style, this is still an excellent ghost story that combines appropriate amounts of humor and terror while integrating Germanic legend with New England folklore, specifically that of New York State. Garland's realistic oil paintings are either portraitures or landscapes. The former are reminiscent of Barry Moser's work, while the latter resemble those by Thomas Locker. While these illustrations act as a sophisticated balance to Irving's wordy narrative, they do not consistently evoke the mood of Arthur Rackham's interpretation (1990). In her retelling for younger children (1987, both Morrow), Diane Wolkstein avoids the African-American stereotypes that Irving used for ``comic relief'' and concentrates on telling a good story, eliminating the complicated and archaic language of the period. All in all, this new version is useful where additional copies of the unabridged edition are needed. --Andrew W. Hunter, Public Library of Charlotte and Mecklenburg, Charlotte, NC
Carolyn Phelan
Many folk-art paintings illustrate this simplified retelling of Washington Irving's "Legend of Sleepy Hollow". Varied in size from small vignettes to double-page spreads, the colorful paintings are reminiscent of the works of Moses' great-grandmother, better known as Grandma Moses. A large-format picture book that will fill a need in some libraries.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781577658191
Publisher:
ABDO Publishing Company
Publication date:
01/28/2002
Series:
Great Illustrated Classics Series
Pages:
236
Product dimensions:
5.50(w) x 7.90(h) x 0.80(d)
Age Range:
8 - 13 Years

Meet the Author

Washington Irving, the first American writer to make his living by his profession, was born April 3, 1783. At the age of six he was introduced to his namesake, George Washington. He studied law but then was sent to Europe because of his health and was to spend 17 years abroad. When he was thirty-five his family's business went bankrupt. It was then that he began to support himself by writing. He wrote letters, essays and short fiction. Washington Irving died in 1859.

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Legend of Sleepy Hollow and Rip Van Winkle 3.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 4 reviews.
AVoraciousReadr More than 1 year ago
2 classics I can cross off my Bucket List *Book source ~ Local library I picked up a few copies of The Legend of Sleepy Hollow at the library because my daughter had to read it for her AP English class. I chose a few copies because I wasn’t sure which one she’d want to read and of the four I read the one with Sleepy Hollow and Rip Van Winkle. My husband decided to read one of the others and my daughter chose yet another. The boys read the last copy, so all the books got some reading love. The copy I read is from 1967. It is a large print with illustrations, but there is no ISBN and I can’t find it anywhere online to link this exact copy. Anyway…it’s hard to believe I haven’t read either of these stories. Heard about them, yes. Actually read them, no. I’m not all that big on classics, but I found both of these stories ok. I did enjoy the extra background in both stories as I could only remember the bare bones of each tale. I do wonder what happened to Ichabod Crane though. Did the pumpkin in the face kill him and he was buried out in the woods? Or was he so scared he took off, even without his stuff? As far as Rip Van Winkle goes, no wonder his wife nagged him. He was a lazy worthless guy and his son didn’t fall far from the tree.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
HollandPurchase-NY More than 1 year ago
The illustrations in the edition leave some realism to be desired, but the story is wonderful for Hudson Valley enthusiasts!
Guest More than 1 year ago
Two great stories in one! In 'Rip Van Winkle', a man sees the ghosts of Henry Hudson and his men, and falls asleep for 20 years. In 'The Legend Of Sleepy Hallow', a new school-master falls for a women. On Halloween night he get chased by a headless horseman.