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Legion

Legion

4.4 74
by Brandon Sanderson
     
 

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Brandon Sanderson is one of the most significant fantasists to enter the field in a good many years. His ambitious, multi-volume epics (Mistborn, The Stormlight Archive) and his stellar continuation of Robert Jordan’s Wheel of Time series have earned both critical acclaim and a substantial popular following. In Legion, a distinctly contemporary novella filled

Overview

Brandon Sanderson is one of the most significant fantasists to enter the field in a good many years. His ambitious, multi-volume epics (Mistborn, The Stormlight Archive) and his stellar continuation of Robert Jordan’s Wheel of Time series have earned both critical acclaim and a substantial popular following. In Legion, a distinctly contemporary novella filled with suspense, humor, and an endless flow of invention, Sanderson reveals a startling new facet of his singular narrative talent.

Stephen Leeds, AKA “Legion,” is a man whose unique mental condition allows him to generate a multitude of personae: hallucinatory entities with a wide variety of personal characteristics and a vast array of highly specialized skills. As the story begins, Leeds and his “aspects” are drawn into the search for the missing Balubal Razon, inventor of a camera whose astonishing properties could alter our understanding of human history and change the very structure of society. The action ranges from the familiar environs of America to the ancient, divided city of Jerusalem. Along the way, Sanderson touches on a formidable assortment of complex questions: the nature of time, the mysteries of the human mind, the potential uses of technology, and the volatile connection between politics and faith. Resonant, intelligent, and thoroughly absorbing, Legion is a provocative entertainment from a writer of great originality and seemingly limitless gifts.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Reality and illusion, sanity and insanity, are but subjective labels in this thought-provoking foray into a world where visions abound like the biblical demons the title evokes. Narrator Stephen Leeds, also known as “Master Legion,” alternately describes himself as schizophrenic and asserts his own sanity, even though his “hallucinations... are all quite mad.” Sanderson (the Mistborn series) sends them all to Jerusalem on a mission to retrieve a camera that may be able to photograph past events. Its inventor, Balubal Razon, has stolen it to photograph the resurrected Jesus. The engaging if madcap events of this outré narrative unobtrusively prompt the reader to reflect on the nature of reality. Complications pile on to expand the divergence from normality (“Your hallucination has hallucinations”) even as mainstream philosophical issues are addressed in an Alice’s Tea Party atmosphere. The conclusion is left clouded in ambiguity, and Sanderson suggests that the big questions may be beyond our ability to resolve. Agent: Joshua Bilmes, JABberwocky Literary Agency. (Sept.)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781480528086
Publisher:
Brilliance Audio
Publication date:
05/28/2013
Edition description:
Unabridged
Product dimensions:
6.30(w) x 6.20(h) x 1.00(d)

Meet the Author

Brandon Sanderson grew up in Lincoln, Nebraska. He teaches creative writing at Brigham Young University and lives in Utah with his wife and children.

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Legion 4.4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 74 reviews.
flyingtoastr More than 1 year ago
Legion is a fantastic short story: part mystery, part psychology, with plenty of humor and action to keep the pace brisk. The characters are diverse and interesting, the story asks some very deep questions about the nature of thought and belief, and Mr. Leeds and his multiple hallucinations are simply begging for a sequel (or a television series). However, there are some minor issues that prevent me from giving it the full five stars. In particular, the simple constraints of the length of the book make the plot feel almost rushed, especially towards the end of the story. Many supporting characters are not given more than a page or two of characterization, which leaves them somewhat flat. While this is understandably a result of the short story format, it is somewhat disappointing given Sanderson's incredible epics. Those minor critiques aside, I would strongly recommend picking up a copy of Legion. It's a great way to spend a few hours, and it may even make you ask some questions about your own reality. I would love to read more adventures in the Legion universe, but hopefully as full-length novels where the fantastic cast of characters Sanderson has created have a chance to truly shine.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Brandon Sanderson has definitely established himself as an idea man in the fantasy/scifi genre. While many lament an "ugh, not yet ANOTHER magic system" from his other works, little do they know that is by design on a grander scale. In this short story, he doesn't fail to disappoint and it's great to see more work outside of his Cosmere. The idea that there's a man so incredibly smart that his one personality cannot keep track of everything so instead has created a personality, an aspect, representing his varying facets of expertise is well done. It's not completely spelled out and in fact the character himself denies this despite Sanderson leaving some subtle clues that it really is all him, but with limitations such that it makes the reader almost believe that the main character really is just an ordinary guy summoning these aspects to assist him. In equal part genius is the format. Sanderson is largely known for his sweepingly large epic novels, but it's obvious from this and The Emperor's Soul that despite already having a lifetime's worth of material to write in the form of the Stormlight Archive and the ongoing Mistborn novels, that he's still cranking out ideas. And these short stories are the perfect way to get these ideas out without having to dedicate 250,000+ words to get them out. No, not everything is fleshed out (which I'm sure Sanderson himself would still need to do in a larger volume), but it throws the idea out to the readers to digest and immediately want more. Personally, I think this story has a great potential to turn into a serial TV show. There's a couple over arcing plots with the superb potential for a weekly episodic plot. And with that, Sanderson could pass the reigns of writing episodes off to others while still staying involved. Overall, I'm looking forward to seeing more of this. I hope he doesn't go epic with it. He's already got that. Let's see something different...
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I think my insanity makes more sense to me now.
AudiobookReviewer More than 1 year ago
What do you do when you have 47 personalities who act separately from you and with each other? Solve crimes, of course. Stephen Leeds does not have personality disorder (at least according to him), he is completely aware of his many personalities, knows they are not real, yet interacts with them as people. Essentially they are different aspects of his brilliant mind that each have unique skills. He can call on them to help him with cryptography, handwriting analysis, chemical engineering, even languages, and come in pretty handy to solve the most challenging mysteries. Steven Leeds and his several personalities (you don’t meet all of them, about 10) are funny, neurotic, helpful, strange and just fun. Written in the first person, you get a myopic view of Stephen Leeds’ life, but one couldn’t imagine doing this another way. The book is very short, not much longer than a lengthy short story, even less than a novella. That is fine, it works, though if you used one credit on Audible, you might be a little disappointed how quickly it goes. The plot and the supporting characters are ridiculous and forgettable. The point of the story is the personalities and how they interact with each other and the world. It’s good fun and worth the two hour listen. Oliver Wyman does a fine job with the narration, keeping the characters clearly defined in your ear. His pacing is good and he remains “transparent” throughout the book, leaving the story for the listener to imagine. Don’t look for earth shattering revelations or philosophical enlightenment from Legion, just a couple of hours distraction. Overall this is a fun listen and you’ll get through it quickly with a smile on your face. Audiobook purchased for review by ABR. Please find this complete review and many others at audiobookreviewer dot com [If this review helped, please press YES. Thanks!]
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Really different. Good read.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
If you've never read any of Sanderson's work you should do so immediately! Legion, though a quick read is an awesome novella. I envy those of you who are discovering this or any of his works for the very 1st time.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Great read, brandon does it again
Drewano More than 1 year ago
I love the premise where a super genius creates hallucinations to help him track, categorize and process the vast amounts of knowledge that he has.  The characters (including the hallucinations) are interesting, funny and quirky and combined with great writing it makes for a great base but in the end it’s a short story and in this case it’s just too short of a story to deliver a great product.
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Caroles_Random_Life More than 1 year ago
I am quickly becoming a HUGE Brandon Sanderson fan. I only recently become introduced to Sanderson a couple of months ago when I read Steelheart and I am starting to realize that I have really been missing out. This story was completely unique and entertaining. I love how different this story was from anything I have ever encountered before. This story is short but it is highly complex and detailed. I decided to read this story because I thought I had the audiobook already in my audible account, I discovered that I actually had the second book in the series so I quickly remedied that situation and started listening right away. I think that the narrator did a fantastic job with this story. He voice was soothing to listen to and he did such a fantastic job with a wide range of characters. Steven Leeds is probably one of the most interesting characters that I have encountered in a book. He is never alone. He lives with his aspects, otherwise known as his hallucinations. Each one of his aspects is an expert in a certain area. Steven claims that he is not a genius and that his aspects are the intelligent one. Of course, he also claims that he isn't crazy and to be honest he acts completely sane if you ignore the fact that he spends most of his time talking to his hallucinations. Steven is quickly enlisted to help locate a missing camera. This isn't just any camera. This camera takes photos that should not exist. When he thinks about what this camera means to society, he feels he has no choice but to try to find it. Steven and his aspects make quite the formidable team as they work to achieve their goal. There are moments in the story when I just need to stop and think for a bit, moments I laughed a little, and other times where I could find out what was going to happen next fast enough. The characters in this story are unbelievably good. Sanderson was able to create a man with a mansion full of hallucinations who appears to be completely sane. Every single aspect that were involved in the story had a distinct personality. While everyone around Steven saw a man talking to nobody, we, the reader, got to see exactly what Steven saw and it was amazing. I never experienced a moment of boredom during the story. Of course, how could I? J.C was running around with guns and hallucinations having hallucinations - I simply had no idea what could possibly be next. I would highly recommend this story to others. I cannot wait to spend more time with Steven and his aspects. I will definitely be reading more from Brandon Sanderson in the not too distant future.
Arrat More than 1 year ago
This is a short story about 120ish pgs. I thought this was an awesome story. You have a man who "has other separate personalities". He has rooms for them, orders food for them, & waits outside the car door for them to get into the car. The story is mystery and he uses the "people" he has created to help solve it. I did not give it the full five, because at the beginning it was a little confusing, & more back ground on the "alts" would have helped the storyline. He does have a 2nd book out and I can't wait to read it. Mr. Sanderson seems to be able to create new universes, new magic, and riveting storylines. Please check out his other works!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
As soon as i started reading i was hooked. Its short but for $3 it was great.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This story is full of seeming contradictions that fill an eccentric man's life as he solves mysteries. It's a very interesting story!
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Sanderson always does a great job and this is no different. I would've enjoyed a full novel involving this character even more.
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Of this does go to television, and I hour of does, I hope the production company gives this the attention it deserves. Don't half ass it. You have struck gold here. Now it's up to the television companies to mine every Shiney nugget!
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Never disappointed with a Sanderson read...except when I realize I have reached the end.