The Lemonade Crime (The Lemonade War Series #2) [NOOK Book]

Overview

Following the laws of our legal system, Evan and Jessie’s fourth grade class concocts a courtroom on the playground, putting Scott Spencer, alleged thief, on trial. They create a legitimate courtroom—with a judge, witnesses, a jury of their peers—and surprising consequences.
   As she explores the difficulties of fairness, Jacqueline Davies once again reveals how good she is at understanding the complex emotions of children this ...

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The Lemonade Crime (The Lemonade War Series #2)

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Overview

Following the laws of our legal system, Evan and Jessie’s fourth grade class concocts a courtroom on the playground, putting Scott Spencer, alleged thief, on trial. They create a legitimate courtroom—with a judge, witnesses, a jury of their peers—and surprising consequences.
   As she explores the difficulties of fairness, Jacqueline Davies once again reveals how good she is at understanding the complex emotions of children this age.

This book features a teaser chapter from book three of the Lemonade War series, The Bell Bandit.

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Editorial Reviews

From Barnes & Noble

Is Scott Spencer a lemonade stand cashbox thief? To decide the answer to that ominous question, Evan and Jessie's fourth grade class place the school bully in the defendant box at a classroom trial, complete with judge, jury, witnesses, cross-examinations, and a verdict. Jacqueline Davies' The Lemonade Crime can teach youngsters more about justice, fairness, and sibling loyalty than a dozen episodes of CSI.

From the Publisher
"The realistic depiction of the children’s emotions and ways of expressing them will resonate with readers. Great for discussion, this involving and, at times, riveting chapter book has something to say and a deceptively simple way of saying it."—Booklist, starred review

"Short chapters, realistic dialogue and social dynamics, humor, and suspense will keep even reluctant readers turning pages to the satisfying conclusion."—School Library Journal

Children's Literature - Sharon Oliver
This sequel to The Lemonade War seeks to answer the question of who stole the lemonade profits from the first book. Or, more precisely, who stole the money from Evan after he stole it from his sister Jessie. Evan is already uncomfortable with his younger sister skipping a grade and joining him in fourth grade, so he reluctantly participates in his sister's mission to uncover the culprit. Since Jessie's sure she already knows who the guilty party is, she accuses classmate Scott Spencer, who recently purchased a very expensive video game system and was seen leaving the scene of the crime. Jessie manages to organize her class into a de facto court on the playground and proceeds on her quest to prove Scott guilty. In keeping with the format from the first book, each chapter begins by defining the legal term that serves as the chapter title. Along the way Evan wrestles a bit with his newfound attraction to classmate Megan and learns a little bit more about the real Scott Spencer. A recommended title for those waiting to solve the mystery of the missing money from the first book, but with limited character development this is far from Davies' most compelling work. Reviewer: Sharon Oliver
School Library Journal
Gr 4–6—Events in The Lemonade War (Houghton Harcourt, 2007) are over, and fourth grade has just started. Jessie and Evan are in the same class, and neither sibling is quite comfortable with this situation. Jessie is the youngest kid in the class, thanks to skipping third grade. She wisely gives her brother plenty of space. When she arrives on the playground each morning, she hangs on the outskirts and observes. But her strong sense of fairness and dislike for Scott Spencer cause her to speak up when he cuts in line one morning. Then he begins bragging about the new video-game system he just got, thanks to his mom's connections. Jessie wonders where he got the money for it. And once she shares her suspicions with Evan, a new war is on. The last one involved which of them could make the most money during the last week before school. This time, it's a legal war. Evan is convinced that Scott stole his lemonade-stand proceeds but he can't prove it. Now that there's circumstantial evidence pointing at Scott, Jessie and Evan join forces to make the case. Each chapter heading defines a tenet of our legal system and frames the action. Short chapters, realistic dialogue and social dynamics, humor, and suspense will keep even reluctant readers turning pages to the satisfying conclusion. The Lemonade Crime is certainly a first purchase for collections that have The Lemonade War. But it can stand alone and would make a lovely read-aloud, especially in tween classrooms, where it's all about justice and fairness.—Brenda Kahn, Tenakill Middle School, Closter, NJ
Kirkus Reviews

This sequel toThe Lemonade War(2007), picking up just a few days later, focuses on how the fourth graders take justice into their own hands after learning that the main suspect in the case of the missing lemonade-stand money now owns the latest in game-box technology.

Siblings Evan and Jessie (who skipped third grade because of her precocity) are sure Scott Spencer stole the $208 from Evan's shorts and want revenge, especially as Scott's new toy makes him the most popular kid in class, despite his personal shortcomings. Jessie's solution is to orchestrate a full-blown trial by jury after school, while Evan prefers to challenge Scott in basketball. Neither channel proves satisfactory for the two protagonists (whose rational and emotional reactions are followed throughout the third-person narrative), though, ultimately, the matter is resolved. Set during the week of Yom Kippur, the story raises beginning questions of fairness, integrity, sin and atonement. Like John Grisham'sTheodore Boone, Kid Lawyer(2010), much of the book is taken up with introducing courtroom proceedings for a fourth-grade level of understanding. Chapter headings provide definitions ("due diligence," "circumstantial evidence," etc.) and explanation cards/documents drawn by Jessie are interspersed.

Readers will enjoy this sequel from a plot perspective and will learn how to play-act a trial, though they may not engage with the characters enough to care about how the justice actually pans out.(Fiction. 8-10)

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780547573656
  • Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
  • Publication date: 5/2/2011
  • Series: Lemonade War Series , #2
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 160
  • Sales rank: 14,208
  • Age range: 9 - 12 Years
  • File size: 4 MB

Meet the Author

Jacqueline Davies is the talented author of The Lemonade War, and The Boy Who Drew Birds, as well as other novels and picture books.  She makes her home in Needham, Massachusetts with her family.

Jacqueline Davies is the talented writer of several novels and picture books, including The Lemonade War series and The Boy Who Drew Birds. Ms. Davies lives in Needham, Massachusetts, with her family. Visit her website at www.jacquelinedavies.net.

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Read an Excerpt

Chapter 1 Fraud

fraud (frôd), n. The crime of deceiving someone for personal or financial gain; a person who pretends to be something that he or she is not.

"No fair!" said Jessie. She pointed to the four chocolate chip cookies that her brother, Evan, was stuffing into a Ziploc bag. They were standing in the kitchen, just about ready to go to school—the fourth day of fourth grade for both of them, now that they were in the same class.
  "Fine," said Evan, taking out one cookie and putting it back in the cookie jar. "Three for you. Three for me. Happy?"
   "It’s not about being happy," said Jessie. "It’s about being fair."
   "Whatever. I’m outta here." Evan slung his backpack over his shoulder, then disappeared down the stairs that led to the garage.
   Jessie walked to the front-room window and watched as her brother pedaled down the street on his bike. She still didn’t have her bike license, so she wasn’t allowed to ride to school without a parent riding along. That was just one of the bad things about skipping third grade and being the youngest kid in the fourth-grade class. Everyone else in her class could ride to school, but she still had to walk.
   Jessie went to the refrigerator and crossed off another day on the lunch calendar. Today’s lunch was Chicken Patty on a Bun. Not her favorite, but okay. With her finger, she tapped each remaining day of the week and read out loud the main dish: Deli-Style Hot Dog (barf); Baked Chicken Nuggets with Dipping Sauce; Soft-Shell Tacos; and, on Friday, her favorite: Cinnamon-Glazed French Toast Sticks.
   Saturday’s box was empty, but someone had used a red marker to fill in the box: Saturday Yom Kippur
   Jessie put her hands on her hips. Who had done that? Probably one of Evan’s friends. Adam or Paul. Messing up her lunch calendar. Probably Paul! That was just like him. Jessie knew that Yom Kippur was a very serious Jewish holiday. She couldn’t remember what it was for, but it was definitely serious. You were not supposed to write the word par-tay! after Yom Kippur.
   "Jessie, are you all ready?" asked Mrs. Treski, walking into the kitchen.
   "Yep," said Jessie. She picked up her backpack, which weighed almost as much as she did, and hefted it onto her shoulders. She had to lean forward slightly at the waist just to keep from falling backwards. "Mom, you don’t have to walk me to school anymore. I mean, I’m a fourth-grader, you know?"
   "I know you are," said Mrs. Treski, looking on the garage stairs for her shoes. "But you’re still just eight years old—"
   "I’ll be nine next month!"
   Mrs. Treski looked at her. "Do you mind so much?"
   "Can’t I just go with Megan?"
   "Isn’t Megan always late?"
   "But I’m always early, so we’ll even out."
   "I suppose that would be okay for tomorrow. But today, let’s just walk together. Okay?"
   "Okay," said Jessie, who actually liked walking to school with her mother, but wondered if the other kids thought she was even more of a weirdo because of it. "But this is the last time."
   It took them less than ten minutes to get to school. Darlene, the crossing guard, held up her gloved hands to stop the traffic and called out,
   "Okay, you can cross now."
   Jessie turned to her mother. "Mom, I can walk the rest of the way myself."
   "Well," said Mrs. Treski, one foot on the curb, one foot in the street. "All right. I’ll see you when school gets out. I’ll wait for you right here." She stepped back up on the curb, and Jessie knew she was watching her all the way to the playground. I won’t turn around and wave, she told herself. Fourth-graders don’t do that kind of thing. Evan had explained that to her.
   Jessie walked onto the playground, looking for Megan. Kids weren’t allowed in the school building until the bell rang, so they gathered outside before school, hanging on the monkey bars, sliding down the slide, talking in groups, or organizing a quick game of soccer or basketball—if they were lucky enough to have a teacher who would let them borrow a class ball before school. Jessie scanned the whole playground. No Megan. She was probably running late.
   Jessie hooked her thumbs under the straps of her backpack. She had already noticed that most of the fourth grade girls didn’t carry backpacks. They carried their books and binders and water bottles and lunches in slouchy mailbags. Jessie thought those bags were stupid, the way they banged against your knees and dug into your shoulder. Backpacks were more practical.
   She wandered toward the blacktop where Evan and a bunch of boys were playing HORSE. Some of the boys were fifth-graders and tall, but Jessie wasn’t surprised to find out that Evan was winning. He was good at basketball. The best in his whole grade, in Jessie’s opinion. Maybe even the best in the whole school. She sat down on the sidelines to watch.
   "Okay, I’m gonna do a fadeaway jumper," said Evan, calling his shot so the next boy would have to copy him. "One foot on the short crack to start." He bounced the ball a few times, and Jessie watched along with all the other kids to see if he could make the shot. When he finally jumped, releasing the ball as he fell back, the ball sailed through the air and made a perfect rainbow—right through the hoop.
   "Oh, man!" said Ryan, who had to copy the shot. He bounced the ball a couple of times and bent his knees, but just then the bell rang and it was time to line up. "Ha!" said Ryan, throwing the ball sky high.
   "You are so lucky," said Evan, grabbing the ball out of the air and putting it in the milk crate that held the rest of the 4-O playground equipment.
   Jessie liked Evan’s friends, and they were usually pretty nice to her, so she followed them to stand in line. She knew not to get in line right behind Evan. He wasn’t too thrilled about having his little sister in the same classroom with him this year. Mrs. Treski had given Jessie some advice: Give Evan some space, so that’s what she was doing.
   Jessie looked across the playground just in case Megan had appeared, but instead she saw Scott Spencer jumping out of his dad’s car. "Oh, great!" muttered Jessie. As far as Jessie was concerned, Scott Spencer was a faker and a fraud. He was always doing something he wasn’t supposed to behind the teacher’s back, and he never got caught. Like the time he cut the heads off the daffodils that were growing in the art room. Or when he erased stars from the blackboard so that his desk group would win the weekly Team Award.
   When Scott got to the line, he cut right in front of Jessie and tapped Ryan on the back of the shoulder. "Hey," he said.
   "Hey," said Ryan, turning and giving him a nod.
   "Excuse me," said Jessie, poking Scott in the arm. "The end of the line is back there." She jerked her thumb behind her.
   "So what?" said Scott.
   "So you can’t just cut in front."
   "Who cares? All we’re doing is going into school."
   "It’s a line," said Jessie. "The rule is you go to the end of the line."
   "Who cares what you say?" said Scott, shrugging and turning his back on her. The line was starting to move forward. Scott punched a couple more boys on the arm and said hey to them. Some of the boys said hi back, but Jessie noticed that Evan kept looking straight ahead.
   "Man, am I late," said Scott to Ryan. He was grinning from ear to ear. "I couldn’t stop playing my new Xbox 20/20."
   "You got a 20/20?" asked Ryan.
   Paul turned around. "Who did? Who got one?"
   "He says he did," said Ryan, pointing to Scott.
   "No way," said Paul. "That’s not even out yet."
   "Well, you can’t get it in a store," said Scott. "But my mom knows people in Japan."
   Jessie looked toward Evan, who was at the front of the line. She could tell that he hadn’t heard what Scott said, but more and more boys in line turned around to hear about the 20/20. It was the newest game system, with surround-sight goggles and motion-sensing gloves. The line in front of Jessie started to bunch up.
   When Jessie got to the door of her classroom, Mrs. Overton was standing there, saying good morning to each student as the line filed in.
   "Mrs. Overton, Scott Spencer cut in front of me this morning." Jessie was no tattletale, but Scott needed to learn a thing or two about rules.
   Mrs. Overton put a hand on Jessie’s shoulder. "Okay, Jessie. I’ll watch tomorrow to make sure it doesn’t happen again, but for now, let’s just let it go."
   Perfect! thought Jessie as she walked to her desk and took down her chair. Scott Spencer gets away with something again.
   After putting her chair on the floor, she walked out into the hall to hang her backpack in her locker. She tore off a corner of a page from her Writer’s Notebook and quickly wrote a note on it. Then, as she passed Evan’s desk on the way to her own, she slipped the note into his hand. She didn’t see him open it and read it, but by the time she sat down at her own desk, she could tell that he had. Evan was staring at Scott Spencer, and you could practically see bullets coming out of his eyes.

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 138 )
Rating Distribution

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(101)

4 Star

(16)

3 Star

(7)

2 Star

(4)

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(10)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 139 Customer Reviews
  • Posted February 1, 2012

    The Lemonade Crime

    Lemonade Crimes is a wonderful fiction book for students grades 2nd to 5th. It is the second book in a series of three by Jacqueline Davies. A student in a fourth grade classroom has just gotten an X Box 20/20. All of the kids thought this was very cool, except for Jessie and Evan, who are in the same grade because Jessie has skipped a grade. Last summer Evan had a large amount of money stolen from the pocket of his shorts, and begins to ponder whether or not Scott Spencer took his money to buy this new X Box. The brother and sister team decide that they are going to set up a court to "judge" whether or not Scott is guilty of a crime. The student form a full courtroom setting with a judge, jury, and witnesses. This story could be a great tool in the classroom to teach about law and justice.

    38 out of 48 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 3, 2011

    !!!!!AWESOME!!!!!

    This book is amazing, cute and awesome! The drawings are adorable and the story is so cute! I don'r know how anybody doesn't like this book!!!!! people who don't like this are INSANE!!!!

    21 out of 35 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted October 12, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    Great read for kids!

    Complete with judge, jury, eye witnesses, and trial, the Jessie and Evan's fourth grade class learn about the judicial system while on the playground. Davies use of legal terms at the beginning of each chapter helps children understand complex situations with simplicity.

    In the sequel to the The Lemonade War, Jacqueline Davies tells the story of Evan and Jessie and how they take the law into their own hands. Who stole Evan's money? How did Scott afford his new game system? The siblings were sure they knew where Scott got the money and Jessie was determined to prove it

    18 out of 24 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 23, 2012

    Sick i have read the Sick

    I have red the 1st book i liked it but the second book it is better *****: )

    13 out of 28 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 24, 2012

    Love it

    This book is amazing i loved i hope EVERYONE READS ThIS book

    11 out of 20 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 5, 2012

    Storyguy

    Now this one is pretty good i think better than the first one at least 1 out of 10 i give this a 7 the first one a 6 so ya

    10 out of 19 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 17, 2012

    Love it!

    You will love it whoever reads it!

    10 out of 18 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 24, 2012

    Awesomme

    It rocks!!!!

    10 out of 21 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted May 7, 2011

    Hu

    Is it a kids book?

    8 out of 30 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 2, 2011

    THIS BOOK IS GOING TO BE AWSOME!!!!!!!!!!!!

    Im going to stay up till 12:01! That is when the book is going to come out! OMG! I cant wait! All of this dufea book seris are usually full of awsomeness! I hope this one is to!!

    8 out of 19 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 20, 2013

    Sweetsome sweet and awsome

    Great must read

    6 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 18, 2013

    Tardis

    Need! need !need! need! need !need!
    i give it 10000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000 stars!

    4 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 20, 2013

    Great

    I thought this was a fantastic book! The average lives of two 4th grader siblings Jessie (who skipped 3rd grade), and Even are disrupted by the looming suspicion that Scott, a fellow 4th grader stole the hard earned $208 that Jessie and friend Megan earned selling lemonade. Scott was seen leaving the scene of the crime shortly before Even goes upstairs to find the $208 missing.

    [] The seeds of doubt grow when Jessie overhears Scott talking about his new Xbox 20/20 that his mom got from Japan. Jessie and Even are bitterly wondering how Scott could have possibly gotten the money for this and Jessie decides to take matters into her own hands.

    [] Soon, Jessie and Even have set up their own trial for Scott, and the question is: is the evidence that Scott's unruly nature and his hasty retreat from the swimming pool really enough to convict Scott of a serious crime?

    4 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 10, 2012

    Fun

    Really fun to read first one is really good

    4 out of 9 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 8, 2013

    It was great

    All my friends read it so I read it. It was great but not the best book ever

    3 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 11, 2012

    GREAT

    It was one of the best books i have ever read

    3 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 14, 2012

    Great book!

    This is one of the BEST books ever! Just as good as the first one!

    3 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 6, 2012

    Really good I have never read anything better

    3 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 30, 2011

    Great (:

    Loved it!

    3 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 20, 2011

    The best book

    This bookbis the best book in the world read it now

    3 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 139 Customer Reviews

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