Lemonade in Winter: A Book About Two Kids Counting Money

Lemonade in Winter: A Book About Two Kids Counting Money

5.0 4
by Emily Jenkins, G. Brian Karas
     
 

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In a starred review, Publishers Weekly declared this delightful picture book "a beautifully restrained tribute to trust and tenderness shared by siblings; an entrepreneurship how-to that celebrates the thrill of the marketplace without shying away from its cold realities; and a parable about persistence."

A lemonade stand in winter? Yes, that's

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Overview

In a starred review, Publishers Weekly declared this delightful picture book "a beautifully restrained tribute to trust and tenderness shared by siblings; an entrepreneurship how-to that celebrates the thrill of the marketplace without shying away from its cold realities; and a parable about persistence."

A lemonade stand in winter? Yes, that's exactly what Pauline and John-John intend to have, selling lemonade and limeade—and also lemon-limeade. With a catchy refrain (Lemon lemon LIME, Lemon LIMEADE! Lemon lemon LIME, Lemon LEMONADE!), plus simple math concepts throughout, here is a read-aloud that's great for storytime and classroom use, and is sure to be a hit among the legions of Jenkins and Karas fans.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
Publishers Weekly Best of Children's Books 2012

Starred Review, School Library Journal, August 1, 2012:
“This quirky tale is a boon for young entrepreneurs, who will enjoy looking at the humorous details in the pictures as much as working out the math after each sale.”

Starred Review, Publishers Weekly, July 30, 2012:
“In real money terms, this one’s an amazing bargain.”

School Library Journal
PreS-Gr 2—On a cold winter day as a mean wind blows and icicles hang from windowsills, Pauline and her younger brother, John-John, decide to have a lemonade stand. Gathering all their quarters (Pauline's favorite coins), they buy their supplies and make lemonade, limeade, and lemon-limeade. On their mostly empty street with the snow falling, they attract a few customers-Harvey walking his three dogs, Mrs. Gordon and her twins, Heather and Aidan strolling arm in arm, and five manicurists in puffy coats. Despite their advertising, entertainment, decorations, and sales, the children make only four dollars, which is less than the cost of their supplies but enough for two Popsicles. Karas's illustrations, rendered with brush and walnut ink in sepia tones, capture the half-light of an overcast winter day as the children, bundled in warm clothes, tend their stand and count their earnings. A last page, called "Pauline Explains Money to John-John," shows both fronts and backs of different coins and explains their worth. This quirky tale is a boon for young entrepreneurs, who will enjoy looking at the humorous details in the pictures as much as working out the math after each sale. Abounding with teaching possibilities, it's a solid selection for most libraries.—Mary Jean Smith, formerly at Southside Elementary School, Lebanon, TN
Children's Literature - Sylvia Firth
On a cold, blowing, snowy winter day a little girl named Pauline decides she wants to set up a lemonade stand outside her home. Of course her parents try to discourage her, but little brother John-John thinks it is a great idea and wants to help. The two youngsters collect all the quarters they can find (amounting to six dollars) and run off to the store for supplies. Quickly they make lemonade, limeade, and lemon-limeade, set up shop outside and set a price of fifty cents per cup. Using various antics such as cartwheels, balloon decorations, chanting at the top of their lungs as well as a sale price of twenty-five cents a cup, they finally have empty pitchers. But when Pauline counts up their earnings, it totals only four dollars. She is most unhappy because they did not make a profit. Sensibly John-John makes Pauline realize that sixteen quarters is still money and that they can use it to buy themselves popsicles. The illustrations, done with ink and colored pencils in subdued colors are just right for the story. A repeated refrain makes this ideal for story time as it enables children to actively participate. Teachers will also find the book useful for teaching math concepts, as the last page demonstrates how Pauline teaches John-John about money. Add this to the acquisition list as it is certain to be useful as well as enjoyable. Reviewer: Sylvia Firth

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780375958830
Publisher:
Random House Children's Books
Publication date:
09/11/2012
Pages:
40
Product dimensions:
9.10(w) x 11.10(h) x 0.50(d)
Lexile:
AD410L (what's this?)
Age Range:
3 - 7 Years

What People are saying about this

From the Publisher
Publishers Weekly Best of Children's Books 2012

Starred Review, School Library Journal, August 1, 2012:
“This quirky tale is a boon for young entrepreneurs, who will enjoy looking at the humorous details in the pictures as much as working out the math after each sale.”

Starred Review, Publishers Weekly, July 30, 2012:
“In real money terms, this one’s an amazing bargain.”

Meet the Author

EMILY JENKINS is the author of the Toys Trilogy, which includes Toys Go Out, Toy Dance Party, and, most recently, Toys Come Home, which Booklist, in a starred review, called "a timeless story of adventure and friendship to treasure aloud or independently." She is the author of numerous other books for children, including Sugar Would Not Eat It and Five Creatures.

G. BRIAN KARAS is the prolific, versatile, and award-winning illustrator of many books for children, including, most recently, Neville and Clever Jack Takes the Cake, which received four starred reviews. His other books include How Many Seeds in a Pumpkin?; Are You Going to Be Good?, a New York Times Best Illustrated Book; Home on the Bayou, which was the recipient of the Boston Globe-Horn Book Award; and Muncha! Muncha! Muncha!

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Lemonade in Winter: A Book About Two Kids Counting Money 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 3 reviews.
Selah730 More than 1 year ago
Great book... touches on siblings working together to accomplish a goal and also learning to count their money. I purchased this for my grandson who is a bit young for this book but his older sister, who is 8 thoroughly enjoyed it. Wonderful picutres and illustrations as well.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Im here
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Ill brb srry.