Lennon Remembers: The Full Rolling Stone Interviews from 1970

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Overview

Published on the twentieth anniversary of his death, this candid book reveals new information on the breakup of the Beatles, fellow musicians such as Bob Dylan and the Rolling Stones, Lennon’s attitudes towards revolution and drugs, and his relationship with Yoko Ono. Featuring new introductions by Ono and Wenner, and containing substantial material never before seen in print, Lennon Remembers presents a compelling portrait of a complex musical genius at the height of his career. Sometimes anguished and angry, ...
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Overview

Published on the twentieth anniversary of his death, this candid book reveals new information on the breakup of the Beatles, fellow musicians such as Bob Dylan and the Rolling Stones, Lennon’s attitudes towards revolution and drugs, and his relationship with Yoko Ono. Featuring new introductions by Ono and Wenner, and containing substantial material never before seen in print, Lennon Remembers presents a compelling portrait of a complex musical genius at the height of his career. Sometimes anguished and angry, often tender and poignant, these interviews are indispensable to understanding who John Lennon was and why his legacy continues to resonate today.
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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
Lennon Remembers is classic Lennon. It’s not a sit-back-and-put- your-feet-up read ... it’s like a jolt on your nerves like bad, bad espresso. People with weak stomachs should close the window before reading. You might just feel like jumping out.”—Yoko Ono, from the Foreword.

“A must-have for anyone who loves and remembers Lennon.”—San Antonio Exporess

“Arguably the most legendary interview ever conducted with a major celebrity.”—Library Journal

“As riveting a document as it was three decades ago ... there is still nothing to rival this interview in the annals of rock journalism—it has lost none of its power to shock.”—Anthony DeCurtis, Rolling Stone

“Finds Lennon in fine form, still bitter about the breakup of the Beatles, full of optimism about his future solo projects, opinionated, emotional and full of life. It captures his mercurial character more exactly than any other book on the Beatles I’ve read.”—Independent on Sunday

“This is the only voice that will ever articulate what it was really, really like to be in the Beatles when it all went wrong—caught in a moment, rasping, raving, and flaming mad.”—Uncut

Christopher Walsh
The complete Lennon Remembers stands out by virtue of the intimate and honest portrait [it] presents.
Billboard Magazine
Inside.com
[An] evocative and interesting book...exposes a funny, irascible Lennon you either never knew or were too addled to remember.
Christopher Walsh
The complete 'Lennon Remembers' stands out by virtue of the intimate and honest portrait [it] presents. —Billboard Magazine
Library Journal
In December 1970, Rolling Stone ran an interview with John Lennon, conducted by Wenner, the magazine's founder, ostensibly to promote Lennon's first post-Beatles studio album. Fueled by anger, honesty, and ego, it became arguably the most legendary interview ever conducted with a major celebrity. Originally published in 1971, Lennon Remembers has been retranscribed from the original tapes. Segments that Lennon originally excised to spare others' feelings have been reinstated, including comments on his rumored affair with the Beatles's late manager, Brian Epstein. The transcript has also been returned to its original sequence, improving the flow of the conversation. In a new introduction, Wenner admits that the interview suffers from his inexperience, but Lennon trusted Wenner and was ready to purge years of pent-up bitterness over having to "completely humiliate oneself to be what the Beatles were." There may be some demand for this new edition, as it is the source for many of Lennon's comments in the hotly hyped Beatles Anthology (LJ 10/15/00). For larger collections. [For more on Brian Epstein, see Debbie Geller's In My Life, reviewed on p. 83.--Ed.]--Lloyd Jansen, Stockton-San Joaquin Cty. P.L., CA Copyright 2000 Cahners Business Information.
Jeremy Harding
What makes th Lennon interview rewarding the second time around [is that] the perplexing contraditions it revealed at the time seem easier in grasp in retrospect.
London Review of Books
Uncut
This is the only voice that will ever articulate what it was really, really like to be in the Beatles when it all went wrong – caught in a moment, rasping, raving, and flaming mad.
Rolling Stone
As riveting a document as it was three decades ago ... there is still nothing to rival this interview in the annals of rock journalism – it has lost none of its power to shock.— Anthony DeCurtis
San Antonio Express
A must-have for anyone who loves and remembers Lennon.
Independent on Sunday
Finds Lennon in fine form, still bitter about the breakup of the Beatles, full of optimism about his future solo projects, opinionated, emotional and full of life. It captures his mercurial character more exactly than any other book on the Beatles I've read.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781859846001
  • Publisher: Verso Books
  • Publication date: 10/28/2000
  • Edition description: New
  • Pages: 160
  • Sales rank: 1,160,560
  • Product dimensions: 5.70 (w) x 7.90 (h) x 0.79 (d)

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Sort by: Showing all of 4 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 25, 2008

    A reviewer

    The journalistic style of Jann S. Wenner¿s book Lennon Remembers offers a new, non-traditional, and fascinating glimpse into the mind of John Lennon. Rather than telling the story of Lennon¿s life through her own methods of research and writing, Wenner has elected to let Lennon tell his own story in an interview ¿ style method. The conversation between the journalist, and Lennon 'along with his wife Yoko Ono' allows the reader to see John Lennon¿s true self better than any form of factual biography possibly could. Lennon¿s first person account of his life is told in 1970, after the breakup of the Beatles. The slowing of the pace of his life has obviously given him some time to reflect, and Lennon¿s demeanor is telling of this. The book leaves the reader with a multifaceted, less idealized, and altogether more real understanding of Lennon¿s views towards what he has accomplished through his music, his efforts for peace, and even his shortcomings. As a book, Lennon Remembers draws its strength from the manner in which it exposes John Lennon¿s human side. After reading the exact words from Lennon¿s mouth, one begins to see that Lennon was, like the rest of us, a mortal who grappled with conflicting ideas in his life. Throughout the dialogue, Jann Wenner manages to expose Lennon¿s frustration with aspects of his career, how the `dream of the Beatles¿ died within him, and his general distrust of dogmas after his time spent with the hypocritical Maharishi. Lennon¿s description of his life makes it clear that he values the extent to which he could spread pacifism through his music, but simultaneously conveys a tragic loss of faith. The book Lennon Remembers, because it is a direct transcription of Lennon¿s own words, portrays this somewhat depressing shift more powerfully than any traditional biography could. The main downside to Wenner¿s book is the multitude of technical musical discussion which pads some of the discussion. Rather than focusing on the meaning of Lennon¿s music and his philosophies, the book tends to get caught up in the personal relationships of the Beatles and specific musical analysis which seems irrelevant to any reader who is not an avid musician. Lennon, himself, admits that he believes lyrics are the most important part of a song, yet the book devotes entirely too much time to the discussion of musical technicalities, and not nearly enough to the overall message which Lennon wanted to convey to his audience. After reading Jann Wenner¿s Lennon Remembers, I found myself with a new, yet ambivalent view of John Lennon as a person. I had always thought of Lennon as a man who valued peace above anything else in his life. Reading his own reflections about his career made me see him as far less perfect than I had imagined. At times he seemed bitter, prone to bickering, faithless, and as if he had given up on anything he once valued. His admissions to excessive drug use and constant fighting with his band members also seemed to suggest that Lennon was far less of a role model than many think. Upon reflection, however, these flaws are somewhat endearing as well. John Lennon was, after all, a human. He was a man that found himself in a unique position that allowed him tremendous influence in the world, and he tried to do what he could to make the world a better place. He wholeheartedly believed in pacifism, and tried to use his power to further peaceful causes. Even with his pessimistic comments, Lennon allows the reader an opportunity to relate. After all, do we not all go through phases of doubt? If for no other reason, Lennon Remembers is a successful journalistic work because it paints John Lennon for who he truly was.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 20, 2005

    He Remembers Well

    Lennon remembers, and he remembers well. This is pure raw harsh John Lennon. It shows you exactly who he was in 1970. If you loved John's first solo album, then you will love this.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 27, 2009

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    Posted October 12, 2010

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