Lenny and Mel

Lenny and Mel

4.0 1
by Erik P. Kraft
     
 

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Lenny and Mel know how to celebrate holidays in the best ways possible -- well, pretty much the best ways -- and they're ready to share their secrets with you. In this book, you'll learn how to tempt the Leftover Fairy after Thanksgiving. You'll find out the secret behind the mystical New Year's Eve ball drop. Then you'll see how papier-mâché, ziti, and

Overview

Lenny and Mel know how to celebrate holidays in the best ways possible -- well, pretty much the best ways -- and they're ready to share their secrets with you. In this book, you'll learn how to tempt the Leftover Fairy after Thanksgiving. You'll find out the secret behind the mystical New Year's Eve ball drop. Then you'll see how papier-mâché, ziti, and raisins can come in handy on Presidents' Day and Cinco de Mayo. It's all inside. And there's much, much, much more....

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
PW called this story a "spirited tale of impish twins who concoct their own zany holiday celebrations, with deadpan cartoon-panel drawings that may well get even nonreaders in on the laughs." Ages 7-10. (May) Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information.
Children's Literature
Lenny and Mel are two fun loving guys who have their own ideas of how the holidays should be celebrated. Everyone knows that on Labor Day any student who wants to make a good impression with his teacher had better start planning for that perfect gift to take on the first day of school. Ants on a log may be a good choice. Thanksgiving is great time with tons of food, but all that leftover turkey is enough to drive anyone crazy. Turkey rice, turkey pitas, turkey pizza and more turkey is just waiting in the refrigerator. The perfect answer is to leave it under your pillow for the Leftover Fairy. Want to get good presents this year? Leaving Santa the regular cookies and milk won't do, but Lenny and Mel have the perfect solution, guaranteed to put Santa in a more giving mood. This book takes a comical point of view about how to celebrate different holidays throughout the year. It makes for enjoyable reading. 2002, Simon & Schuster, $15.00. Ages 7 to 10. Reviewer: Sharon Tolle
School Library Journal
Gr 2-5-Similar to Dav Pilkey's "Captain Underpants" series and "Ricky Ricotta" books (all Scholastic) in its zaniness, this title will meet the need for more funny books. In nine episodes, Lenny and Mel experience the American holidays in less than typical fashion. From the "Leftover Fairy" who is supposed to exchange all that extra Thanksgiving turkey for cash to the Presidents' Day assignments when the boys spend so much time on the papier-m ch heads that they forget to prepare the oral report, this title offers a unique approach to celebrating. "Presidents' Day is the day for presidents.-There are a lot of sales on this day." Small line drawings that look as if an eight-year-old drew them add to the fun. There are moments of laugh-out-loud hilarity. There are also a couple of episodes that fall a couple fries short of a Happy Meal, and there's lots of room for improvement in the characterization department. Only the CIP indicates that the boys are twins, and readers may wonder why they are in the same class at school. Still, these light, comic adventures will find a ready audience.-Sharon R. Pearce, Geronimo Public School, OK Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
Newcomer Kraft treads unafraid through Scieszka and Pinkwater territory with these holiday misadventures, perpetrated on, or by, clueless twins (fraternal ones, to judge from the stick figure illustrations) Lenny and Mel. Lenny's the smart one, though that's not saying much; it's Mel who goes trick-or-treating as a box, but forgets to cut eyeholes, and guess whose pillow the Thanksgiving leftovers are piled under in hopes of attracting "The Leftover Fairy." It takes two, though, to find just the right snack for Santa (" �ja-la-pe�-o' . . . �I think it means "super cheese' "), or to create giant heads of Washington and Lincoln for Presidents' Day that do double duty as shatterproof pi�atas on "Cinco de My, Oh, My." Linty leftovers aside, the author goes more for droll humor than cheap laffs or grossness. An impromptu neighborhood Flag Day parade, flagless but enthusiastic, caps this promising, easy-reading eye-roller. (Fiction. 7-9)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780689858918
Publisher:
Aladdin
Publication date:
04/18/2012
Series:
Ready-for-Chapters Series
Edition description:
Reprint
Pages:
64
Product dimensions:
5.50(w) x 8.00(h) x 0.20(d)
Lexile:
710L (what's this?)
Age Range:
7 - 10 Years

Read an Excerpt


Lenny and Mel know how to celebrate holidays in the best ways possible -- well, pretty much the best ways -- and they're ready to share their secrets with you. In this book, you'll learn how to tempt the Leftover Fairy after Thanksgiving. You'll find out the secret behind the mystical New Year's Eve ball drop. Then you'll see how papier-mâché, ziti, and raisins can come in handy on Presidents' Day and Cinco de Mayo. It's all inside. And there's much, much, much more....

Meet the Author

Erik P. Kraft lives in Boston, where he constantly has an eye out for undercover reporters. His school didn't have a monkey club either.

Erik P. Kraft lives in Boston, where he constantly has an eye out for undercover reporters. His school didn't have a monkey club either.

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Lenny and Mel 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
ChandlerSwain More than 1 year ago
"Lenny and Mel" is the first in a series of delightfully strange books by writer/artist Erik P. Kraft about two brothers and their unique take on the world about them; in this case, the celebration of a calendar year's worth of holiday festivities. The book, unfortunately, was narrowly marketed to only young readers as older readers and adults would surely find much pleasure in these rather subversive little episodes, recounting the wit of a young Woody Allen in his most inspired New Yorker days. Young readers will delight in what on the surface seems like childhood silliness, but older, more sophisticated readers will recognize the greater subleties of humor, recounting the type of nostalgic, but not unkind humor that was popularized by such classics as the film "A Christmas Story".