Leonard Maltin's Movie and Video Guide 2001

Leonard Maltin's Movie and Video Guide 2001

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by Leonard Maltin
     
 

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To create this quintessential guidebook to the movies, Leonard Maltin has added some 400 new film entries, bringing the total to more than 19,000, and kept pace with video and laserdisc releases.

Overview

To create this quintessential guidebook to the movies, Leonard Maltin has added some 400 new film entries, bringing the total to more than 19,000, and kept pace with video and laserdisc releases.

Editorial Reviews

bn.com
With more than 1,600 pages, Leonard Maltin's 2002 Movie & Video Guide tests the limits of mass market binders; but size isn't its only virtue. Its more than 20,000 capsule movie reviews (including more than 300 new entries) provide everything from synopsis to ratings to running times to the name of that actor you can't quite identify.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780452281875
Publisher:
Penguin Publishing Group
Publication date:
10/01/2000
Series:
Leonard Maltin's Movie and Video Guide Series
Edition description:
Older Edition
Pages:
1664
Product dimensions:
5.36(w) x 8.00(h) x 2.24(d)

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Leonard Maltin's Movie and Video Guide 2001 2.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
tv lovers will consult maltin daily with mixed results. most recent titles are missing. films from before 1950 and oscars are overpraised. many outstanding movies are underrated (3 examples:salome's last dance,my uncle vini, love walked in) Mr Maltin, please less judgements and more up to the minute listings.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I'm willing to forgive him for Taxi Driver, The Truman Show and The Shawshank Redemption. But Fight Club is the final straw. Leonard Maltin used to be my favorite film critic; but how can I respect a man who recommends convoluted Hollywood tripe like The Bone Collector and Double Jeopardy, and condemns the brilliant Fight Club. Fight Club is the most provocative, groundbreaking satire of society and it's institutions, since Kubrick's A Clockwork Orange. Shame on Mr. Maltin (and Mr. Ebert too) for not recognizing a truly important landmark in motion picture history.