Les Miserables (Movie Tie-In)

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Overview

Now a major motion picure, adapted from the acclaimed Broadway musical, starring Anne Hathaway, Hugh Jackman, Russell Crowe, Amanda Seyfried, and Sacha Baron Cohen

Victor Hugo’s tale of injustice, heroism and love follows the fortunes of Jean Valjean, an escaped convict determined to put his criminal past behind him. But his attempts to become a respected member of the community are constantly put under threat: by his own conscience, when, owing to a case of mistaken ...

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U.S. A 2012 Soft Cover Fair Fair condition. Les Miserables (Movie Tie-In) By Victor Hugo (Author), Norman Denny (Translator, Introduction) Product Details Paperback: 1232 pages ... Publisher: Penguin Books; Mti edition (December 4, 2012) Language: English ISBN-10: 0143123599 ISBN-13: Product Dimensions: 8 x 5.4 x 2.1 inches. Read more Show Less

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0143123599 Fair condition. Les Miserables (Movie Tie-In) By Victor Hugo (Author), Norman Denny (Translator, Introduction) Product Details Paperback: 1232 pages Publisher: Penguin ... Books; Mti edition (December 4, 2012) Language: English ISBN-10: 0143123599 ISBN-13: Product Dimensions: 8 x 5.4 x 2.1 inches Read more Show Less

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Les Miserables (Movie Tie-In)

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Overview

Now a major motion picure, adapted from the acclaimed Broadway musical, starring Anne Hathaway, Hugh Jackman, Russell Crowe, Amanda Seyfried, and Sacha Baron Cohen

Victor Hugo’s tale of injustice, heroism and love follows the fortunes of Jean Valjean, an escaped convict determined to put his criminal past behind him. But his attempts to become a respected member of the community are constantly put under threat: by his own conscience, when, owing to a case of mistaken identity, another man is arrested in his place; and by the relentless investigations of the dogged policeman Javert. It is not simply for himself that Valjean must stay free, however, for he has sworn to protect the baby daughter of Fantine, driven to prostitution by poverty. A compelling and compassionate view of the victims of early nineteenth-century French society,Les Misérables is a novel on an epic scale, moving inexorably from the eve of the battle of Waterloo to the July Revolution of 1830.

This striking edition features the widely celebrated and eminently readable translation by Norman Denny.

Trying to forget his past and live an honest life, escaped convict Jean Valjean risks his freedom to take care of a motherless young girl during a period of political unrest in Paris.

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  • Les Miserables Movie Trailer
    Les Miserables Movie Trailer  

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"Hugo's genius was for the creation of simple and recognizable myth. The huge success of Les Misérables as a didactic work on behalf of the poor and oppressed is due to his poetic and myth-enlarged view of human nature." —V. S. Pritchett

"It was Tolstoy who vindicated [Hugo's] early ambition by judging Les Misérables one of the world's great novels, if not the greatest… [His] ability to present the extremes of experience 'as they are' is, in the end, Hugo's great gift." —From the Introduction by Peter Washington

From Barnes & Noble
A rousing adventure story peopled with heartbreaking, unforgettable characters and a powerful allegory about the good and evil lying beneath the surfaces of human beauty, ugliness, and superior intellect.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780143123590
  • Publisher: Penguin Publishing Group
  • Publication date: 12/4/2012
  • Pages: 1232
  • Sales rank: 274,100
  • Product dimensions: 5.34 (w) x 7.97 (h) x 2.21 (d)

Meet the Author

Victor Hugo

Victor Hugo (1802–1885) was the most forceful, prolific and versatile of French nineteenth-century writers. He wrote Romantic costume dramas, many volumes of lyrical and satirical verse, political and other journalism, criticism and several novels, the best known of which are Les Misérables (1862) and the youthful Notre Dame de Paris (1831). A royalist and conservative as a young man, Hugo later became a committed social democrat and during the Second Empire of Napoleon III was exiled from France, living in the Channel Islands. He returned to Paris in 1870 and remained a great public figure until his death: his body lay in state under the Arc de Triomphe before being buried in the Panthéon.

Norman Denny was educated at Radley College, and in Vienna and Paris. He has written a great many short stories under different names and several novels. Among his many translations are Prometheus: A Life of Balzac by Andre Maurois, My Life and Films by Jean Renoir, and The Future of Man by Teilhard de Chardin.

Biography

Novelist, poet, dramatist, essayist, politician, and leader of the French Romantic movement from 1830 on, Victor-Marie Hugo was born in Besançon, France, on February 26, 1802. Hugo's early childhood was turbulent: His father, Joseph-Léopold, traveled as a general in Napoléon Bonaparte's army, forcing the family to move frequently. Weary of this upheaval, Hugo's mother, Sophie, separated from her husband and settled in Paris. Victor's brilliance declared itself early in the form of illustrations, plays, and nationally recognized verse. Against his mother's wishes, the passionate young man fell in love and secretly became engaged to Adèle Foucher in 1819. Following the death of his mother, and self-supporting thanks to a royal pension granted for his first book of odes, Hugo wed Adèle in 1822.

In the 1820s and 1830s, Victor Hugo came into his own as a writer and figurehead of the new Romanticism, a movement that sought to liberate literature from its stultifying classical influences. His 1827 preface to the play Cromwell proclaimed a new aesthetic inspired by Shakespeare, based on the shock effects of juxtaposing the grotesque with the sublime. The great success of Notre-Dame de Paris (The Hunchback of Notre Dame) confirmed Hugo's primacy among the Romantics.

By 1830 the Hugos had four children. Exhausted from her pregnancies and her husband's insatiable sexual demands, Adèle began to sleep alone, and soon fell in love with Hugo's best friend, the critic Charles-Augustin Sainte-Beuve. They began an affair. The Hugos stayed together as friends, and in 1833 Hugo met the actress Juliette Drouet, who would remain his primary mistress until her death 50 years later.

Personal tragedy pursued Hugo relentlessly. His jealous brother Eugène went permanently insane following Victor's wedding to Adèle. His daughter, Léopoldine, together with her unborn child and her devoted husband, died at 19 in a boating accident on the Seine. Hugo never fully recovered from this loss.

Political ups and downs ensued as well, following the shift of Hugo's early royalist sympathies toward liberalism during the late 1820s. He first held political office in 1843, and as he became more engaged in France's social troubles, he was elected to the Constitutional Assembly following the February Revolution of 1848. After Napoléon III's coup d'état in 1851, Hugo's open opposition created hostilities that ended in his flight abroad from the new government.

Declining at least two offers of amnesty -- which would have meant curtailing his opposition to the Empire -- Hugo remained in exile in the Channel Islands for 19 years, until the fall of Napoléon III in 1870. Meanwhile, the seclusion of the islands enabled Hugo to write some of his most famous verse as well as Les Misérables (1862). When he returned to Paris, the country hailed him as a hero. Hugo then weathered, within a brief period, the siege of Paris, the institutionalization of his daughter Adèle for insanity, and the death of his two sons. Despite this personal anguish, the aging author remained committed to political change. He became an internationally revered figure who helped to preserve and shape the Third Republic and democracy in France. Hugo's death on May 22, 1885, generated intense national mourning; more than two million people joined his funeral procession in Paris from the Arc de Triomphe to the Panthéon, where he was buried.

Author biography from the Barnes & Noble Classics edition of The Hunchback of Notre Dame.

Good To Know

Hugo was seen by his fans as a grand, larger-than-life character -- and rumors spread that he could eat half an ox in one sitting, fast for three days, and then work without stopping for a week.

Hugo owned a pet cat named Gavroche -- the name of one of the primary characters in Les Misérables.

The longest sentence ever written in literature is in Les Misérables; depending on the translation, it consists of about 800 words.

When Hugo published Les Misérables, he was on holiday. After not hearing anything about its reception for a few days, Hugo sent a telegram to his publisher, reading, simply:

"?"

The complete reply from the publisher:

"!"

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    1. Also Known As:
      Victor-Marie Hugo
    1. Date of Birth:
      February 26, 1802
    2. Place of Birth:
      Besançon, France
    1. Date of Death:
      May 22, 1885
    2. Place of Death:
      Paris, France

Read an Excerpt

From the Introduction by Peter Washington- Victor Hugo might be regarded as the Mr Toad of French literature: vain, arrogrant, pompous, selfish, cold and stingy; a windbag, a humbug and a fraud, absurdly puffed up with the immensity of his own greatness. But unlike Mr Toad, he was also an astute and energetic promoter of hisown image as a Great Man. The process began early. Writing in Hugo's lifetime, Virginie Ancelot recalls the reception the young poet received in literary drawing-rooms when he arrived to read his latest ode. "...There was a few moments' silence; then someone rose and approached him with visible emotion, took his hand and raised their eyes to heaven.The multitude listened. A single word was heard, to the great surprise of the uninitiated. And this word, which echoed in every corner of the salon, was:'Cathedral!'Then the orator returned to his place; another rose and cried out: 'Ogive!'A third looked round him and ventured:'Egyptian Pyramid!'The assembly applauded, and then it was lost in profound reflection." To the Anglo-Saxon mind - and, it should be said, to many Frenchmen - this is Parisian literary life at its worst: the posturing, the pretension, the self-regard, masquerading under the name of art. Yet Hugo is the man who wrote a handful of the most exquisite lyrics - 'Victor Hugo, helas!'said Gide when someone asked him to name the finest French poet - and at least one novel judged to be supreme. In his person, he sums up all that is most monsterous in writerly vanity; in his best work he transcended his failings. How did he do it? How did a monster come to write the masterpiece that is Les Miserables?
• In an early essay on Scott, Hugo prophesies that"After the picturesque but prosaic novel of Walter Scott, there will still be another novel to create ... It is the novel which is at once drama and epic, picturesque and poetic, real and ieal, true and great, the novel which will enshrine Walter Scott in Homer."These words were written in 1823, just after the publication of his own first novel, Han d'Islande, and there is no doubt that Hugo had himself in mind as the man who could 'enshrine Walter Scott as Homer'. Anyone who can still get through this book may take a rather different view. Set in seventeeth-century Norway and dripping with gore on every page, Han d'Islande is nearer to the Gothic horror tradition than to Scott. For the man who really succeeded in reconciling the genres of epic and historic fiction we have to look further afield, to Hugo's own admirerer, Tolstoy. Yet it was Tolstoy who vindicated the French novelist's early ambition by judging Les Miserables one of the world's great novels, if not the greates, and acknowledged its effect on his own work. Les Miserables was completed in 1862, shortly before the Russian novelist began War and Peace. The two novels are set in the same period. It cannot be said that Hugo had much to teach his junior about structure or characterization; like all his attempts at epic, in prose and verse, Les Miserables rambles, there are huge digressions and absurdities of plot, the characters are often thin, the action melodramatic. But in spacious, vigorous story-telling, in the use of an historical framework, in the relating of human events to a larger philosophical and spiritual context, in the deployment of fiction as a social and political weapon, in the exalatation of 'the people' as a supreme authority, in the treatment of suffering as a dominant theme - in all these matters, Hugo exerted a profound influence on Tolstoy. Without his example, War and Peace might have been a very different novel. Perhaps the most extraordinary point of contact between them concerns Napoleon. One might expect the emperor to intrigue European writers in the early nineteenth century, as he intrigues Byron, Balzac and Stendhal, among others, but by the 1860s almost half a century had passed since Waterloo, yet Hugo and Tolstoy are still trying to unravel the mystery of one whose shadow falls across the entire century. For Tolstoy, Napoleon is pre-eminently a human being - an extraordinary man, certainly, the instrument of destiny, but still a man. For Hugo he is more like a superman, a mysterious brooding presence with almost divine powers. The point is made by an ironic comparison between Napoleon and Wellington. Hugo's argument seems to be that Napoleon ought to have won Waterloo by sheer force of genius - indeed, that he did win it, when judged according to the rules of natural justice - but that Wellington achieved a victory on points by taking more care to spy out the lay of the battlefield and to estimate the balance of forces. Calculation is everything to the mundane Englishman, imagination nothing. When lightning flashes round the emperor's head, the duke looks like a very ordinary man. While Napoleon surveys the heavens, Wellington consults his watch. Clearly, the image of general as genius was vital to Hugo's own project of himself as a literary Napoleon, but there is more to it than that. Commentators have often lamented the digression on Waterloo which is quite unnecessary to the plot and, coming early in the book, throws it decisively out of its narrative stride. But Hugo, though careless of structural refinement, does have a more serious purpose here - a purpose from which Tolstoy must have learnt much, and not only in his description of Borodino. For Hugo, who in turn learnt so much from Scott, grasped the fact that by imprinting the significance of a decisive historical moment on the minds of his readers he could hugely enlarge the scope of his novel. Precisely because Les Miserables is about little people, the history of a great man is one means of linking their petty lives with the Infinite. (The link is made touchingly explicit in the chapter called 'In Which Little Gavroche Takes Advantage of Napoleon the Great'.) Even events as great as Waterloo, we are told, can hinge on details: the location of a ditch, the arrival of a platoon. Conversely, the most trivial life may exemplify a great truth - and in that sense, all lives are equally significant, for every existence embodies these truths. At the same time, Hugo's treatment of Waterloo makes it clear that realities and appearances diverge as much in everyday life as they do in historical interpretation - and that the two divergences are linked. What a post-Waterloo Frenchman thinks of Napoleon helps to shape what he thinks of himself. Sometimes we try to envision history in our own image; sometimes we use it to understand ourselves; at all times we are formed by it without our knowledge. One function of fiction is to help us achieve that knowledge. Les Miserables is, among other things, an attempt to explain the people of the mid-nineteenth century to themselves. Jean Valjean finds himself in a certain situation because he is a poor Frenchman at a particular time. This is one version of Fate - the sociological and political explanation of things. But Valjean is like Waterloo: his life also has a deeper purpose, a hidden meaning. Hugo has a number of names for this meaning - Fate, Destiny, God, the Infinite. But whatever he calls it, we observe a complex dialogue throughout the book between the surface causes of Valjean's predicament - poverty and ignorance - and their deeper meaning, to which he penetrates through suffering.

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 130 )
Rating Distribution

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(80)

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(18)

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(11)

2 Star

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 130 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 26, 2012

    Im going to watch the movie again! Got the book as a Christmas p

    Im going to watch the movie again! Got the book as a Christmas present, and I am currently reading it. The book is just as amazing as the movie! I would rate the movie and book both 5 stars!

    30 out of 38 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 26, 2012

    I saw the movie and it was great!

    The movie was very cool, the story of it was very deep and at the end its very inspiring. I would recommend getting this book even though i haven't read it. It says that the book is tied into the movie so it should be about the same. The only difference is that there probably isnt any singing in the book so its probably just put into words.

    21 out of 58 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 31, 2012

    OH MY GOD!

    I am literally in love with this book! Its a classic and an extraordinary piece of literature. The movie was also the best film I've ever seen in my entire life.

    17 out of 18 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 28, 2012

    Awesome!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    I went to go see the musical in chicago! It was touching, thrilling and a fast paced book! I really recomend this book!!! And its really affordable, affordable and good!?!?!!??!!!!!?!? Thats a really good deal *ViolinMangaChic3*

    17 out of 22 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 26, 2012

    Adventerous

    It is a major mystory. A curl up on the couch with my nook book.

    14 out of 18 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 24, 2012

    Sariel

    Loved.

    13 out of 21 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted January 15, 2013

    Dont not buy this translation, get the unabridged version. Plu

    Dont not buy this translation, get the unabridged version. Plus all of these reviews are fraudulent. Look at the dates and of course they are all anoymous.

    9 out of 15 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 30, 2012

    This was great

    I saw this movie the other day and loved it i cant wait to read this book!

    9 out of 20 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted January 2, 2013

    My fiance and I saw the movie, yesterday. I cannot say enough ab

    My fiance and I saw the movie, yesterday. I cannot say enough about it. My emotions ran the gamut, from joy to sorrow and back to joy! Five stars barely touch my opinion. Now, I'm eager to read the book.

    8 out of 16 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 25, 2012

    Fantastic

    Could be considered literature history.

    8 out of 15 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 25, 2013

    Needs to be more specific on child adaptation Needs to be more specific

    Don't waste your time with this book. Barnes and Noble needs to be more specific that this is an adaptation for children. I wanted to read the real Les Mis. Waste of money.

    7 out of 12 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted February 15, 2013

    Amazing work!Interesting to see how little of the novel made the movie

    A great translation -sheer poetry page after page- but the editing leaves a lot to be desired. Example: the word "die" consistantly appears as "the" throughout. Many typos.
    Still an amazing read if you can wade through hundreds of pages of digressions -some interesting, some political pedantry.

    6 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 28, 2013

    Anonymous January,2013

    The book is amazing!!!!!!so is the movie. Im only 11 and ive watched the movie twice and i read the book once

    4 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 4, 2013

    BEST MOVIE EVER

    I AM 13 AND I AM OBSESSED! I CRIED WHEN MY FAV CHARACTER EPONINE DIED! SAMANTHA BARKS US FREAKING AWESOME AND DONT YOU FORGET IT. IT IS SO EMOTIONAL AND YOU ABSOLUTELY FALL IN LOVE WITH THE CHARACTERS. I WANT TO SEE IT OVER AND OVER UNTIL I GET SICK OF IT (WHICH WILL NEVER HAPPEN ANYWAY ;) ) I CANT REPEAT THIS MESSAGE ENOUGH JUST GO SEE IT!
    -FROSTY

    PS- YES I ALREADY POSTED A WHILE AGO BUT IT DELETED IT SO I DECIDED TO REPEAT MY THOUGHTS

    PPS- SHOTS OUT TO THE 12 YEAR OLD THAT REPLIED TO MY PREVIOUS MESSAGE! VIRTUAL HIGH FIVE TO YOU! YOU ROCK!

    4 out of 11 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 13, 2013

    Bring tissues

    Its very touching. You laugh you cry its awesome

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 8, 2013

    see movie before reading book

    There are a lot of history lessons in the book. Not a fast reader. I'm glad that I saw the movie before reading the book, but I did enjoy it.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 21, 2013

    Read the original not the movie tie in

    This movie tie in version was written to follow the movie which is based on the Broadway musical of the 80s which is based on the Victor Hugo novel written in French inthe 1800s. The original novel was not for children and is several hundred pages, a rather daunting but outstanding read. Hugo also wrote Hunchback of Notre Dame. Very often books are written to tie into a film and may be different and usually easier to read.

    3 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 13, 2013

    AMAZING MOVIE

    I cried at the movie.
    I cried at the soundtrack.

    3 out of 11 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 6, 2013

    To is

    Yes i think this is apropreot for ages13 and up

    3 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 12, 2013

    Oscar winner

    This should won a oscar it such sad story but i love it

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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