×

Uh-oh, it looks like your Internet Explorer is out of date.

For a better shopping experience, please upgrade now.

Lessons for Dylan
     

Lessons for Dylan

by Joel Siegel
 

See All Formats & Editions

At the Age of Fifty-Seven, Good Morning America film critic Joel Siegel learned he would become a first-time father. Two weeks later he learned he had only a 70 percent chance of seeing his child born; he had just been diagnosed with colon cancer. The day he took his wife, Ena, and his son, Dylan, home from the hospital was also his last day of chemotherapy. In

Overview

At the Age of Fifty-Seven, Good Morning America film critic Joel Siegel learned he would become a first-time father. Two weeks later he learned he had only a 70 percent chance of seeing his child born; he had just been diagnosed with colon cancer. The day he took his wife, Ena, and his son, Dylan, home from the hospital was also his last day of chemotherapy. In Lessons for Dylan, Siegel shares all the things he wants his son to know -- just in case he's not here to tell him -- about his family's history and heritage, life's pleasures and sorrows, the challenges of growing up (at any age), and, most importantly, who Dylan's father is and what he values. Threaded throughout are stories and anecdotes from Siegel's extraordinary life: his work in the civil rights movement, his meeting Martin Luther King, Jr., his work on Bobby Kennedy's presidential campaign, his careers in advertising and radio, his days as a Broadway playwright and nights as a Broadway critic, and his experiences interviewing virtually every Oscar winner over the last twenty-five years. Joel doesn't spare Dylan details about the bad times he faced, sharing candidly about the death of his wife, Jane, from a brain tumor, the end of his marriage to Dylan's mom, and surviving three cancer surgeries. He also shares the best of times: great stories from moments he shared with Orson Welles, Paul Newman, Halle Berry, Brad Pitt, Gene Kelly, Morgan Freeman, Stevie Wonder, all four Beatles, and many more. He lays out the History of the Jewish People in Four Jokes for Dylan, and offers fatherly advice on sex ("ask your mother"), work ("be whatever you want to be but, please God, don't want to be an actor"), and what to cook for Rosh Hashanah (recipes included). Full of humor and wisdom, common sense and self-revelation, Lessons for Dylan offers lessons for all of us about what really matters in life.

Editorial Reviews

The Los Angeles Times
Without the "Dear Dylan" that opens every chapter, Siegel has an entertaining, often very funny memoir here; with this salutation, every word that follows has a numbing effect as one realizes that this book is intended for only one reader -- the rest of us are merely eavesdropping: — Nick Owchar
Good Housekeeping
A candid look at battling cancer as a parent of a small child, written with humor and charm.
The New York Times
… a story that has been widely told on the airwaves but works surprisingly well on the page. — Janet Maslin
St. Petersburg Times
a tender autobiography in which the father shares childhood memories,..., his years in show business and humorous bits.
June 8, 2003
Library Journal
good laughs and interesting tidbits... a compelling [read]. His humanity and obvious love for his son are touching.
May 15, 2003
Atlanta Journal-Constitution
funny and tender... Siegel shares all the things he wants his son to know, just in case he's not around.
May 18, 2003
Publishers Weekly
Good Morning America's entertainment critic Siegel, who at age 54 was diagnosed with cancer shortly after the birth of his first child, has turned his potential tragedy into a warmhearted memoir written as letters to his son, Dylan. Siegel covers a wide range of topics and tells many fascinating stories, ranging from details of "three cancer surgeries and chemo and CAT scans and six months of radiation in the past five years," to personal descriptions of movies that he hopes to watch with his son one day. He offers anecdotes from his various jobs writing in advertising, for radio and as a joke writer for Bobby Kennedy's 1968 presidential campaign. He also gives great short histories of his previous marriages, his famous interview subjects (including all four ex-Beatles) and his Jewish heritage, including a hilarious glossary of Yiddish words that includes 29 words for "schmuck." Most touching are Siegel's various pieces of fatherly advice, from how to recognize one's life work ("follow your passion") to how to deal with bullies ("If you fight back and get hit, it hurts a little while; if you don't fight back it hurts forever"). While Siegel is currently healthy, his memoir stands as a powerful account of a life well lived and as a beautiful testimonial to the love of a parent for a child. (May) Forecast: Without a doubt, this will be one of the topselling feel-good gifts for Father's Day. Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781586481278
Publisher:
PublicAffairs
Publication date:
04/18/2003
Edition description:
1ST
Pages:
400
Product dimensions:
5.86(w) x 8.66(h) x 1.35(d)

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Post to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews