Lessons from the Courtroom

( 13 )

Overview

With more than 40 years of practice and 100 jury trials to his name, Frank Jones has learned a thing or two about what it takes to win in the courtroom. In Lessons from the Courtroom, he distills his career into an accessible, insightful guide that will find a keen readership among new trial lawyers, experienced attorneys, and anyone interested in the legal world. Jones takes a look at the changes in the profession over the past 40 years, showing readers where the opportunities are for new attorneys. He then ...

See more details below
Available through our Marketplace sellers.
Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (3) from $45.64   
  • New (1) from $145.00   
  • Used (2) from $45.64   
Close
Sort by
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Note: Marketplace items are not eligible for any BN.com coupons and promotions
$145.00
Seller since 2014

Feedback rating:

(185)

Condition:

New — never opened or used in original packaging.

Like New — packaging may have been opened. A "Like New" item is suitable to give as a gift.

Very Good — may have minor signs of wear on packaging but item works perfectly and has no damage.

Good — item is in good condition but packaging may have signs of shelf wear/aging or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Acceptable — item is in working order but may show signs of wear such as scratches or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Used — An item that has been opened and may show signs of wear. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Refurbished — A used item that has been renewed or updated and verified to be in proper working condition. Not necessarily completed by the original manufacturer.

New
Brand new.

Ships from: acton, MA

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Close
Sort by
Lessons from the Courtroom

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK
  • NOOK HD/HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$19.99
BN.com price

Overview

With more than 40 years of practice and 100 jury trials to his name, Frank Jones has learned a thing or two about what it takes to win in the courtroom. In Lessons from the Courtroom, he distills his career into an accessible, insightful guide that will find a keen readership among new trial lawyers, experienced attorneys, and anyone interested in the legal world. Jones takes a look at the changes in the profession over the past 40 years, showing readers where the opportunities are for new attorneys. He then discusses the jury trial system and how attorneys can gain practice both in and out of the courtroom. He also tackles such key issues as working with judges, understanding jurisdictional matters, the nuances of arbitration, and using expert witnesses.

Readers will find insights that they can apply to their own practice in Lessons from the Courtroom. Although not a step-by-step recipe for proven success, this handy guide will provide readers with priceless information usually gained only through hard-fought experience.

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781427798596
  • Publisher: Kaplan Publishing
  • Publication date: 5/5/2009
  • Pages: 224
  • Product dimensions: 5.90 (w) x 9.10 (h) x 1.10 (d)

Meet the Author

Frank G. Jones has been an attorney with the Houston, Texas, law firm Fulbright and Jaworski, LLP for more than 40 years. He has tried more than 100 jury cases and has represented a wide range of clients from diverse industries. Mr. Jones’s practice focuses on business law issues, information technology, securities litigation, and product liability.

Mr. Jones is a member of numerous professional organizations and associations, including the Houston Bar Association, the State Bar of Texas, and the American Bar Association, as well as the American Counsel Association, American College of Trial Lawyers, and the International Academy of Trial Lawyers. He is former chair of the Houston Bar Foundation and a fellow of the Texas Bar Foundation. Mr. Jones is highly-regarded in the field and has been named in “Best Lawyers in America,” “Who’s Who in Legal USA,” and “Super Lawyer.”

Mr. Jones is a prolific writer, speaker, and lecturer. He has been a featured speaker at numerous Houston Bar Association events; and he is a frequent panelist at various CLE sessions, including some hosted by Lexis/Nexis.

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Dedication ix

Acknowledgments xi

Introduction xiii

Chapter 1 Establish Your Reputation 1

When to Start 1

Your Courtroom Reputation: Distinguish Yourself from the Furniture 3

Big Juror is Watching You 5

Your Law Firm Reputation 6

Mistakes Happen: Can You Confide in a Senior Partner? 6

Your Internet Reputation 11

Don't Be a "Dirty Tim" 12

Chapter 2 Communicate! 15

Effective Client Communication Enhances Your Reputation 15

Good Client Communication Can Help with Jury Communication 16

Keep the Client Informed 17

Chapter 3 Stresses of the Job 19

Stress 19

A Balanced Life 21

Remembering the Low Points 22

Chapter 4 So You Want To Go To Trial 27

Adapting to Changes in the Legal Profession 27

Getting Into the Courtroom 28

Refusing to Settle May Get You in Front of a Jury 33

Looking For Small Cases 34

Chapter 5 Discovery 37

What Do You Really Need To Try Your Case? 37

Question Checklist 39

Using a Written Chronology to Organize Facts 40

Chapter 6 What You Need To Discover 43

Getting What You Need 43

Are You Ready to Try the Case? 46

Chapter 7 Depositions 49

An Important Tool 49

The Use of Depositions 50

Taking an Effective Deposition 51

Presenting Your Witness 57

Even the Best Witnesses Can Be Trapped 58

Mechanics You Need to Consider 59

What to Cover 61

Chapter 8 Voir Dire 85

What's Up With Juries? 85

Voir Dire 86

Effective Jury Selection 87

Let the Games Begin 88

Before Commencing Your Voir Dire 91

Striking Scenarios 119

Variations on a Theme: When Opposing Counsel Tries to Employ Innuendo Against You, Your Firm, or Your Client 129

A Well-Done Voir Dire can Make a Difference 132

Chapter 9Trying Your Lawsuit 135

Courtroom Choreography 135

Keeping the Jury Awake 152

Don't Ignore the Benchwarmers 153

Opening Statement 154

Choosing Witnesses for Trial 157

Cross-Examination 164

Rebuttal Evidence 175

Chapter 10 Jury Charge and Final Argument 179

Jury Charge 179

Final Argument 180

Chapter 11 Evaluation and Settlement 189

The Client Wants to Know What the Case is Worth 189

Mock Trials 193

Settling the Case 193

Conclusion 199

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 2
( 13 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(5)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(1)

1 Star

(7)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 13 Customer Reviews
  • Posted April 7, 2011

    Good book for a newby trial attorney

    Jones has done a great job of pointing young lawyers who want to be trial attorneys in the right direction. There are very few books that attempt the subject in modern terms. The jury has changed in the last 20 years and the system has not kept up. I have not found any books that discuss the changes (let alone very many attorneys that understand this). The problem with such a book is that so much of trial is art rather than science. What works for one lawyer might well fall flat for some else. Local rules and norms also will limit the book's help. What works well for someone in Texas could fall flat for the same person in New York. Nonetheless, this book does offer real life insights to the art of trial.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 15, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted February 22, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted March 23, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted March 1, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted January 27, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted April 5, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted January 17, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted July 7, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted March 2, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted March 2, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted January 15, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted August 9, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 13 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)