Let It Begin Here!: Lexington and Concord: The First Battles of the American Revolution

Let It Begin Here!: Lexington and Concord: The First Battles of the American Revolution

by Dennis Brindell Fradin, Larry Day
     
 

In less than 24 hours a rebellious colony would be changed forever.

April 18, 1775
9:30 P.M. Paul Revere learns that the British army is marching to Lexington and Concord to arrest rebel leaders and destroy American military supplies.

11:00 P.M. Revere begins his famous midnight ride to warn his fellow patriots about the British plans.

April 19,

…  See more details below

Overview

In less than 24 hours a rebellious colony would be changed forever.

April 18, 1775
9:30 P.M. Paul Revere learns that the British army is marching to Lexington and Concord to arrest rebel leaders and destroy American military supplies.

11:00 P.M. Revere begins his famous midnight ride to warn his fellow patriots about the British plans.

April 19, 1775
12:00 A.M. Revere reaches Lexington and warns rebel leaders Samuel Adams and John Hancock that the British are coming. They escape and rouse the town's militia.

1:00 A.M. Revere is captured by the British, but a fellow patriot continues on to warn the sleeping village of Concord.

5:00 A.M. An advance lookout for the Lexington militia spots the approaching British army and shouts a warning.

5:20 A.M. Most of the 70 Lexington militiamen, outgunned by the military might of the 250 British regulars, decide to back down. But a few men stand their ground, including Jonas Parker, a grandfather who has vowed never to flee the British.

Suddenly, a shot rings out.

Read More

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature
Paul Revere's midnight ride on April 18, 1775, and the battles in Concord and Lexington the following day are summarized well in this nonfiction picture book by the author of The Signers: The 56 Stories behind the Declaration of Independence. Historical context is given in a brief introduction, but children will enjoy this book more if they already have a rough idea of what the American Revolution was fought for. Every page is a full-color illustration, with a few short paragraphs of text--it works for young children being read to or for older children doing research for history class. Distractingly, it is written in the narrative present, which is supposed to add immediacy but instead makes it sound like a "Choose Your Own Adventure" story ("...two British officers suddenly bolt out from behind a huge tree and try to capture Paul..."). Larry Day's detailed watercolor-and-ink illustrations do a beautiful job of depicting the nighttime ride, the battle scenes, and colonial Boston. Includes maps of the thirteen colonies, and the route from Boston to Lexington and Concord. 2005, Walker & Company, Ages 6 to 11.
—Sara Lorimer
School Library Journal
K-Gr 4-Although brief, this book contains an informative description of the opening shots of the American Revolution. It starts with a who's who identifying the major players and a short introduction that provides some historical context. An hour-by-hour account of the events of April 18 and 19, 1775, follows, beginning with Paul Revere's ride to warn Samuel Adams (pictured in a fetching nightshirt and cap) and John Hancock in Lexington, as well as the patriots in Concord, that the British are on the move. Fradin presents quick summaries of the two battles, highlighting a few interesting facts and individuals in the exciting narrative. Vivid two-page watercolor, gouache, and pen-and-ink illustrations, reminiscent of Robert Andrew Parker's style, dramatize the events. Text blocks are carefully placed both for legibility and design. A map on the front endpapers shows a free rendering of the Boston area; one in the back places Massachusetts within the 13 colonies. A compelling cover, featuring determined-looking patriots holding muskets, will entice youngsters to pick up this book, and its appealing format makes it appropriate for reading aloud. Stephen Krensky's Paul Revere's Midnight Ride (HarperCollins, 2002) has a similar look and tone, but a different focus. Neil Johnson's The Battle of Lexington and Concord (Four Winds, 1992) provides more detail and is illustrated with reenactor photographs.-Elaine Fort Weischedel, Milton Public Library, MA Copyright 2005 Reed Business Information.

Read More

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780802789457
Publisher:
Walker & Company
Publication date:
04/01/2005
Pages:
32
Sales rank:
1,390,633
Product dimensions:
8.81(w) x 11.35(h) x 0.40(d)
Age Range:
7 - 11 Years

Related Subjects

Meet the Author

Dennis Brindell Fradin is the author of The Signers: The 56 Stories Behind the Declaration of Independence, which won numerous awards, including being named an ALA Notable, an American Booksellers for Children's Choice, and an International Reading Association Teachers' Choice. The New York Times Book Review called it "fascinating for young historians and just about anyone else."

Dennis lives in Evanston, Illinois, with his wife, Judith.

Larry Day has illustrated several picture books while working in the advertising industry, creating storyboards for such clients as McDonalds and the U.S. Army. His illustrations have appeared in the Chicago Tribune Magazine and in several exhibits, including his own shows.

Larry lives in Downers Grove, Illinois, with his wife, Melanie, and their two sons, Andrew and Peter.

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >