Let the Lynx Come In

Let the Lynx Come In

by Jonathan London, Patrick Benson
     
 
To go where you've never been before, someplace dark and cold and wild, takes great courage--and promises greater rewards. In Jonathan London's haunting story, a boy opens his door one winter night to let in a magnificent lynx. The lynx commands him to climb on his back and takes him into the wilderness to ride the northern lights as far as the moon. Full color.

Overview

To go where you've never been before, someplace dark and cold and wild, takes great courage--and promises greater rewards. In Jonathan London's haunting story, a boy opens his door one winter night to let in a magnificent lynx. The lynx commands him to climb on his back and takes him into the wilderness to ride the northern lights as far as the moon. Full color.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Like many of London's (The Owl Who Became the Moon) previous books, Let the Lynx Come In lends a distinctive poetry to natural themes; but here, as in his best books, his language approaches the resonant power of myth. In a cabin in the north woods, a father sleeps by the pot-bellied stove while his wide-awake son imagines what lies outside in the vast darkness. At the sound of scratching, the boy opens the door and beholds a lynx, which steps inside. While "firelight glows in its yellow eyes," the wildcat grows "till his whiskers touch the walls!" He commands the youngster to climb up for a ride. Continuing to grow, the Great Lynx takes the child past the tips of pine trees to "claw up and up the curtains" of the rippling northern lights, all the way to the moon. London's poetic prowess and ability to capture awe renew the familiar theme of riding into the wild night on an animal's back. The fine texture and modulated light of Benson's (Owl Babies) watercolor and ink illustrations gentle the story, bathing the recklessness of the narrator's adventure in the benign qualities of a satisfying dream. Ages 5-8. (Sept.)
Children's Literature - Liz Gordon
This any-age, fairy-tale promotes the beauty and wonder of adventure. London's line, "Let the lynx come in," says to the reader, don't be afraid to expand your world. And as charmingly as the flight to the moon on a lynx's back is described, it's the illustrations, the young boy's eyes in particular, that provoke a world of emotion in the reader. At the end, you want to not only open your mind to adventure but your eyes, your heart and your arms. This is the kind of book that children may choose to memorize.
School Library Journal - School Library Journal
PreS-Gr 2A young boy and his father hike to a wilderness cabin. While dad snores in front of a potbelly stove, the boy frets over what might be lurking in the woods outside: wolves, bears, "And a lynx." At a scratching on the door, he opens it and sees the lynx. The creature enters the cabin and begins to grow larger. He silently bids the boy to climb on his back, and then carries him across the snowy landscape to watch the dance of the northern lights. Their journey continues to the moon, and then they return home. London's poetic tale conveys his love and respect for the natural world. His prose, though, is somewhat stilted and passive for a tale that centers on overcoming one's fears. Benson's lovely, watercolor-and-line illustrations lack a sense of mystery: his lynx seems a trifle tame. This isn't a particularly compelling book. London's The Owl Who Became the Moon (Dutton, 1993) or Martin Waddell's Owl Babies (Candlewick, 1992), which Benson illustrated, easily surpass this offering.Marilyn Taniguchi, Santa Monica Public Library, CA

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781564025319
Publisher:
Candlewick Press
Publication date:
09/02/1996
Edition description:
1st ed
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
9.18(w) x 11.83(h) x 0.39(d)
Age Range:
5 - 8 Years

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