Let the Nations Be Glad!: The Supremacy of God in Missions / Edition 2

Let the Nations Be Glad!: The Supremacy of God in Missions / Edition 2

3.2 5
by John Piper
     
 

ISBN-10: 080102613X

ISBN-13: 9780801026133

Pub. Date: 02/01/2003

Publisher: Baker Publishing Group

Let the Nations Be Glad! has become a modern missions classic. A trusted resource for thousands of missionaries, pastors, church leaders, and laypeople, it provides a biblical basis for missions and worship. This third edition has been expanded to include timely new material on the prosperity gospel.  See more details below

Overview

Let the Nations Be Glad! has become a modern missions classic. A trusted resource for thousands of missionaries, pastors, church leaders, and laypeople, it provides a biblical basis for missions and worship. This third edition has been expanded to include timely new material on the prosperity gospel.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780801026133
Publisher:
Baker Publishing Group
Publication date:
02/01/2003
Edition description:
REV
Pages:
256
Product dimensions:
5.90(w) x 8.90(h) x 0.70(d)
Age Range:
18 Years

Table of Contents

Preface to the Third Edition 9

Acknowledgments 13

Introduction to the Third Edition: New Realities in World Christianity and Twelve Appeals to Prosperity Preachers 15

Part 1 Making God Supreme in Missions: The Purpose, the Power, and the Price

1 The Supremacy of God in Missions through Worship 35

2 The Supremacy of God in Missions through Prayer 65

3 The Supremacy of God in Missions through Suffering 93

Part 2 Making God Supreme in Missions: The Necessity and Nature of the Task

4 The Supremacy of Christ as the Conscious Focus of All Saving Faith 133

5 The Supremacy of God among “All the Nations” 177

Part 3 Making God Supreme in Missions: The Practical Outworking of Compassion and Worship

6 A Passion for God's Supremacy and Compassion for Man's Soul: Jonathan Edwards on the Unity of Motives for World Missions 227

7 The Inner Simplicity and Outer Freedom of Worldwide Worship 239

Conclusion 255

Afterword: The Supremacy of God in Going and Sending Tom Steller 261

Subject Index 265

Person Index 269

Scripture Index 273

A Note on Resources: Desiring God 281

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Let the Nations Be Glad! 3.2 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 5 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
Finally puts to rest the old argument what is most imporant for the chruch, worship or missions/evangelism by showing how these two work together. A good start to build a theological base...i then moved to the practical outworking of this in Transformation by Bob Roberts. I have heard his second volume will specifically deal with how to enable your church to do what Piper so encourages us to do...get the nations aware of and praising the God who is Global.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book is incredible! You know the feeling where you want to reach the entire world with the gospel, but all you find is the burden and condemnation telling you that youre not getting the job done? Trust in the Lord! He is working through you as you walk with Him daily, and most of all, God is in control. This book is definatly worth buying.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book really deserves 2 stars (not the 1 that I gave it) but it is so overrated by the other reviews that I felt a need to balance it out. I have not finished this book yet, and will edit this review with more detailed information when I have completed it. Piper has interesting ideas which suffer from his attrocious use with the English language. For one, his obsession with constructing catch phrases from words that all begin with the same letter is corny, and leaves him scrambling to cohere to a malconstrued outline. The writing contains neither the common-man appeal of C.S. Lewis nor the eloquence of great theologeans such as Jonathan Edwards, to whom Piper seems to aspire. As for the content - Psalms seems to be the bulk of his theology in the first chapter, and what follows is hardly an exigesis: ideas are presented as if from nowhere, while Piper hurls often non-contextual scriptures at them. If this is really the best book available on missions, then Christianity is in big trouble.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I wrote my initial review when I was 18 and in seminary school. Not only do I disagree with the messages of this book, I would recomend that before picking it up to condsider you would first read 'Fear and Trembling' by Kierkegaard. I no longer consider myself a christian, but a follwer of truth that is first found in myself.