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Let Us Pray: A PLEA for Prayer in Our Schools
     

Let Us Pray: A PLEA for Prayer in Our Schools

by William J. Murray
 
Reveals the substance behind conservative opinion on the issue of school prayer in America. Looks at the historical roots of the controversy from the Enlightenment to Americas Founding Fathers, from religious tolerance in the colonies to the Bill of Rights. Examines the growing secularization of society in the 20th century from the Supreme Courts 1963 decision in

Overview

Reveals the substance behind conservative opinion on the issue of school prayer in America. Looks at the historical roots of the controversy from the Enlightenment to Americas Founding Fathers, from religious tolerance in the colonies to the Bill of Rights. Examines the growing secularization of society in the 20th century from the Supreme Courts 1963 decision in Murray v. Curlett, which outlawed voluntary prayer in public schools, to the decline of morality in public schools. Explores what Americans are thinking & what our leaders are saying on this issue. Considers what the restoration of voluntary prayer in schools would mean.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Murray, an ordained minister in Texas and an outspoken advocate of prayer in U.S. public schools, now regrets his historic role as 14-year-old plaintiff in the case against the Baltimore school system that led to the Supreme Court's 1963 decision banning school prayer and Bible reading. Rejecting the militant atheism of his mother, Madalyn Murray O'Hair, whose anti-prayer campaign molded his youth, he argues here that the Founding Fathers never intended to remove prayer from public institutions or the workplace. Thomas Jefferson's call for a ``wall of separation between church and State'' applied to Congress only and did not include public schools, in his analysis. Assailing what he views as the Supreme Court's calculated policy of secularization, Murray invokes John Locke, Tocqueville and others who attached great importance to religion as a moralizing force in society. He advocates a constitutional amendment that would allow voluntary prayer if students initiate it and school districts accommodate it. This polemic, written with Ross (coauthor of Compassionate Capitalism), is not likely to win over those not committed to his viewpoint. Author tour. (Sept.)
Ray Olson
The Murray of "Murray "v." Curlett", the 1963 Supreme Court decision that declared state-mandated prayer in public schools unconstitutional, grew up (he was 14 when the case started) to become a staunch Christian. Now, with writer-researcher Ross' aid, he contributes to the debate over religious-governmental relations a measured, reasonable argument for allowing, not mandating (local option to pray in school would be the new rule), the return of prayer to school. He strives to show that the era of secular dominance in America is over, that judicial decisions establishing the fabled wall of separation between church and state misunderstood the Constitution and the intellectual climate that produced it, and that the 30-year coincidence of governmental disapprobation of religion and rising crime rates is not accidental. Because he is never preachy and doesn't expect miracles from school prayer--just a step toward restoring moral instruction to the curriculum--he is awfully convincing. With a school prayer amendment now on Congress' docket, expect to see more of Murray as well as demand for his book.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780688145637
Publisher:
HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date:
08/28/1995
Edition description:
1st ed
Pages:
224
Product dimensions:
5.81(w) x 8.49(h) x 0.94(d)

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