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Let's Count the Raindrops
     

Let's Count the Raindrops

5.0 1
by Fumi Kosaka (Illustrator)
 
Let's count the raindrops
as they pour:
one million, two million,
three million, four.
-Alan BenjaminBrimming with fun-to-read, easy-on-the-ears poems, Let's Count the Raindrops is just right for very young listeners. The poems range from silly to evocative, but all have one thing in common-kid appeal! Fumi

Overview

Let's count the raindrops
as they pour:
one million, two million,
three million, four.
-Alan BenjaminBrimming with fun-to-read, easy-on-the-ears poems, Let's Count the Raindrops is just right for very young listeners. The poems range from silly to evocative, but all have one thing in common-kid appeal! Fumi Kosaka's whimsical illustrations capture the wonder and excitement weather can bring to a small child's world.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Newcomer Kosaka's illustrations of 10 poems about the weather seem, like the poems, as fresh as spring. Including works by John Ciardi, Margaret Wise Brown and Karla Kuskin, the entries are uncomplicated in both language and sentiment, ideally suited for preschoolers. Kosaka unifies the book by picturing a girl in red and her enthusiastic dog as the subjects or speakers of each poem. They revel in the "green and growing" (Aileen Fisher) June grass that is perfect for going barefoot, and they stare in wonder at the "white sheep, white sheep,/ on a blue hill" (Christina Rossetti), or drifting clouds. As the girl struggles to pull on her winter clothes, the dog brings her mittens; as she stands ankle-deep in a puddle of rain, he hides behind her, frightened of the jumping frogs. Kosaka's compositions are appealingly simple. Elements that might be cloying the red triangle that serves as the girl's nose, the mostly-black-and-white dog's rosy cheeks are subdued by the glowing colors and complex textures, rich like the surfaces of a basketball or a piece of vintage leather. Thoughtfully executed, the art delivers just the right amount of stimulation for an appreciation of the poetry. Ages 3-7. (May) Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.
Children's Literature
The illustrations accompanying this collection of ten poems about the weather feature a young girl with her frisky spotted pup and capture perfectly the joy of being outdoors and the magic of watching a snowfall. The little girl's red dress and hair are whipped about as the wind twirls her doggie up in the air, and her face is a picture of contentment in the illustration for "Wouldn't You?" by John Ciardi. "White sheep, white sheep,/Where do you go?" asks Christina G. Rossetti in "Clouds," and Karla Kuskin writes of the heaviness of "Winter Clothes." A poem by Aileen Fisher is particularly catchy. It is simply titled, "June!" and explores the joy of going barefoot. The title of the book is taken from Alan Benjamin's playful poem about counting the millions and millions of drops falling during a rainstorm. This collection offers an introduction to excellent poetry for the very young. 2001, Viking/Penguin Putnam, $15.99. Ages 3 to 6. Reviewer: Carolyn Mott Ford
School Library Journal
PreS-Gr 1-These 10 brief poems can be found in numerous other sources. Kosaka showcases each selection on a double-page spread featuring a moppet with an oversized head and spindly arms cavorting with her dog. The illustrations are literal depictions of the poems (a child holds an umbrella and splashes in a puddle for Alan Benjamin's "Let's Count the Raindrops," a child gets dressed for Karla Kuskin's "Winter Clothes," etc.) and do not extend the text in any way. The artwork was done with acrylics on a painting surface that was first prepared with gesso and has a murky look that is unlikely to appeal to the intended audience. Other collections for this age group are far superior to this potential shelf-sitter.-Grace Oliff, Ann Blanche Smith School, Hillsdale, NJ Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
An unusual art technique involving acrylics applied with dry brushes to a surface prepared with sponge rollers gives this delightful collection of weather poems a distinctive look. Ten poems by writers ranging from Christina Rossetti to Margaret Wise Brown and Douglas Florian are linked by Kosaka's sprightly doll-like little girl with straight cut hair, a red dress, and a triangle nose, who is accompanied by an equally charming dog. The two dance across the pages in various weathers and seasons, blowing in the wind, seeing sheep in the clouds, and counting the raindrops with gleeful frogs. Each page is a delight, and each small poem a winner in this collection that will appeal to young children and their caregivers no matter what the weather. (Poetry/picture book. 3-7)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780670896899
Publisher:
Penguin Publishing Group
Publication date:
05/21/2001
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
8.78(w) x 10.04(h) x 0.40(d)
Age Range:
3 - 7 Years

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Let's Count the Raindrops 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Whatever the weather the stylized illustrations of Japanese artist Fumi Kosaka will bring enjoyment to all. Each of Kosaka's paintings, created with acrylics and dry brush, accompanies an easily understood poem descriptive of the weather. John Drinkwater's ode to the sun is a happy refrain, while Aileen Fisher's 'June!' presents a perfect time to go barefoot. Christina Rossetti's 'Clouds' are pictured as white sheep; Margaret Wise Brown pays tribute to autumn when the leaves come tumbling down. This pairing of art and poetry will be returned to again and again.