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Let's Look at Dinosaurs
     

Let's Look at Dinosaurs

by Frances Barry
 

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Take a fun hands-on look at dinosaurs and other prehistoric creatures with the help of striking collage illustrations, bold flaps, and a die-cut surprise.

Did you ever wonder how far a pterosaur can fly? Why the triceratops has such a large frill around its neck? Or what a pachycephalosaurus does with its bony head? Through large flaps and fold-outs, an

Overview

Take a fun hands-on look at dinosaurs and other prehistoric creatures with the help of striking collage illustrations, bold flaps, and a die-cut surprise.

Did you ever wonder how far a pterosaur can fly? Why the triceratops has such a large frill around its neck? Or what a pachycephalosaurus does with its bony head? Through large flaps and fold-outs, an appealing question-and-answer narrative, and fascinating facts on each spread, readers learn how dinosaurs were born, what they ate, how they defended themselves, what sounds they made, how they lived, and what remains of them today. Included is a handy pronunciation guide to the names of the dinosaurs and related prehistoric beasts.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Gentle dinosaurs rendered in matte collage are maneuvered and concealed via flaps and simple pop-ups, while "I wonder..." statements are quickly answered. The enormous wings of an eggplant-colored pterodactylus flap back and forth ("I wonder how far pterodactylus can fly. He flies for long distances looking for food"); a scarlet tyrannosaurus swings its head up to greet readers; a diplodocus shows its full length thanks to a pair of flaps; and a sleek die-cut doubles as a fossil and a museum exhibit. Barry's gently textured collages readily suggest pebbly skin and natural terrain, and even the fiercest dinosaurs have a friendliness that will please preschool-age dino-buffs. Ages 3–7. (June)
Children's Literature - Eleanor Heldrich
The book examined by this reviewer has a serious flaw. The backstrip is twice as wide as needed with the result that, in the binding process, or perhaps later during shipping, the book's cover paper has ripped apart where the front cover meets the back strip. As for the contents of the book, with the exception of the last small dinosaur, all of the dinosaurs are introduced by questions such as: "I wonder why ankylosaurus has a club at the end of his tail." or "I wonder how long Diplodocus is." The strange colors of the dinosaurs and the choice of questions and answers make this an entertaining book rather than a serious study. Each of the thirteen double-page spreads has a different dinosaur and most of them have a cut-out, a flap, or a pop-up to make the dinosaur longer or wider or taller. The back and front endpapers feature the same twelve dinosaur silhouettes. On the front pages they are facing the back with names and pronunciation guides, and in the back the same dinosaurs are all facing the front pages with labels telling something about them; for instance, "Stegosaurus had a brain the size of a walnut." Let's Look at Dinosaurs is non-threatening and fun for beginning dinosaur fans, but do make sure the book you purchase has not been damaged. Reviewer: Eleanor Heldrich
School Library Journal
PreS-Gr 1—In this interactive title, readers discover interesting facts about a dozen dinosaurs. Each page sets up an "I wonder" statement, the answer to which is often revealed by lifting a flap: "I wonder what stegosaurus is doing in the undergrowth. She is eating ferns and other plants growing close to the ground." Extra facts can be found on each page, which help to deepen the readers' understanding. Children will enjoy the bright collage art, subject matter, and interactive nature of this book. Simple facts make it ideal for a younger audience. An excellent choice for lap reading.—Jasmine L. Precopio, Fox Chapel Area School District, Pittsburgh, PA
Kirkus Reviews

Barry's latest interactive text appeals to the youngest of dinosaur aficionados, presenting them with some very basic facts about how dinosaurs lived.

Through a pseudo–question-and-answer format, readers are given the opportunity to ponder their own answers to the author's wonderings: "I wonder why minmi is watching her eggs. / Her eggs are hatching." One or two sentences in a smaller font give more information: "Dinosaurs laid eggs in nests on the ground." As the text progresses, children learn what dinosaurs ate, how big they were, how they might have defended themselves and communicated, what is left of them today and how fossils are found. Barry uses the words "may" and "might" liberally, remarking that scientists are still learning. The 12 featured prehistoric beasts include a nice mix of popular/lesser-known, large/small, land/sea/air and vegetarian/carnivore. While Barry's illustrations are brightly colored to attract young children's attention, the textures of the papers used in the collages more closely echo those found in nature. But the real draw will be the interactive features—smack Ankylosaurus' tail club, watch Pterodactylus spread his wings and open two flaps to get a sense of just how long Diplodocus was. Endpapers serve as a pronunciation guide, give some quick facts and feature dinosaur silhouettes in sizes proportionate to one another so readers can get an idea of their relative sizes.

Dinosaurs, pop-ups and flaps to lift—what could be better? (Picture book. 2-5)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781406327120
Publisher:
Walker & Company
Publication date:
06/28/2011
Age Range:
3 - 7 Years

Meet the Author

Frances Barry is the creator of three novelty concept books about Duckie and the Fold Out and Find Out books Big Yellow Sunflower and Little Green Frogs. Her most recent book is Let’s Save the Animals. She lives in London.

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