Let's Talk About It: Adoption

Overview

Fred Rogers opens the door for adopted children and their parents to safely talk about their good and sometimes not-so-good feelings in a book about the joy of belonging and the love that unites families. 'Rogers' unaffected delivery has a way of making scary things unscary, which should help parents as much as kids.? —The Bulletin of the Center for Children's Books 'The premise of this book-that it is good for families to talk about feelings-is a welcome one to apply to the ...

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Overview

Fred Rogers opens the door for adopted children and their parents to safely talk about their good and sometimes not-so-good feelings in a book about the joy of belonging and the love that unites families. 'Rogers' unaffected delivery has a way of making scary things unscary, which should help parents as much as kids.? —The Bulletin of the Center for Children's Books 'The premise of this book-that it is good for families to talk about feelings-is a welcome one to apply to the subject of adoption.' —School Library Journal

Discusses what it means to be part of a family and examines some feelings that adopted children may have.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
In tackling another difficult subject for children, Mr. Rogers of PBS-TV fame stresses that this photo-essay is intended as a jumping-off point to spark family discussions. However-perhaps as a result of providing such leeway-Rogers's text is vague and lacking specific information. He emphasizes the basic need for a loving family unit: "Being in a family means belonging. You could belong in your family by being born into it, or you could belong in your family by being adopted into it.'' The "how'' and "why'' questions sure to arise from this simplified presentation are thrown into the reader's court. Rogers also suggests helpful ways for children to deal with feelings that commonly accompany discussions about adoption. Though they seem somewhat posed, Judkis's photos of three ethnically diverse families gives this treatment a believable universality. Ages 3-6. (May)
Children's Literature - Jeanne K. Pettenati
This adoption book uses photographs of three ethnically diverse families to enhance the text. Many families will find it useful for this feature alone. Children can see that adoption is a universal way to build a family. The excellent photos show adopted children doing everyday things with their parents. The book is generally accessible, but there are instances when parents may want to skip text or substitute their own words, depending on the age of the child or the child's current concerns. The central themes are that children should feel comfortable discussing their feelings with their parents and that each family is special because of the ways its members belong together.
School Library Journal
PreS-K-The premise of this bookthat it is good for families to talk about feelingsis a welcome one to apply to the subject of adoption. Rogers presents a simple look at three adoptive families. He includes a brief but reassuring reference to the birthparents and the reasons for their decision. Clear, full-color photos show happy, sad, and angry children and adults; the text suggests that such emotions occur in all families, and states that "being angry doesn't mean that love goes away.'' This is an improvement over the relentlessly nice family in Valentina Wasson's The Chosen Baby (HarperCollins, 1977). Unfortunately, the first photograph, showing rows of babies in a nursery, is reminiscent of the unreal "chosen child'' stories that have made some adoptees feel pressured to continue being wonderful enough to be chosen from the line-up. In Betty Jean Lifton's Tell Me a Real Adoption Story (Knopf, 1994), illustrations show the adoptive parents meeting the pregnant birthmother, giving a more complete and grounded story. Maxine Rosenberg's Being Adopted (Lothrop, 1984) provides more depth and clarity than Rogers does, but (like almost all of the better adoption titles) is for older children.Nancy Schimmel, formerly of San Mateo County Library, CA
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780698116252
  • Publisher: Penguin Group (USA) Incorporated
  • Publication date: 3/28/1998
  • Series: Mr. Rogers Series
  • Edition description: Reissue
  • Pages: 32
  • Sales rank: 368,223
  • Age range: 4 - 8 Years
  • Product dimensions: 8.10 (w) x 10.01 (h) x 0.09 (d)

Meet the Author

Producer, magician, writer, puppeteer, minister, husband, father, Fred Rogers started out in children's television thirty years ago. The direction he trailblazed was the "creation of television programming that spoke, with respect, to the concerns of early childhood, not as adults see it but as children feel it."

He has received virtually every major award in the television industry for work in his field, and dozens of others from special-interest groups.

Fred Rogers lives in Pennsylvania.

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Sort by: Showing all of 3 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 4, 2003

    Must Have!

    This is a great book for children! I am in the process of adopting toddlers and think this book is great. It shows a lot of pictures of adoptive families, including transracial and addresses a lot of concerns that kids would have. Excellent!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 24, 2003

    Mr. Rogers couldn¿t fail even if he tried.

    This is a lovely book about adoption, beautifully telling in words and pictures what being a family is all about, adoptive or not. It tells just enough about adoption not to confuse the young child but to focus on feelings every child has and how to cope with them. Five stars for Mr. Rogers whom we sorely miss every day. Gisela Gasper Fitzgerald, author of ADOPTION: An Open, Semi-Open or Closed Practice?

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 27, 2003

    our favorite

    As a family formed through adoption, we have put together quite a collection of children's books on adoption. Fred Rogers' book on adoption may be visually on the plain side, but it has the most sensitively written text of any adoption book; hands down. In a comforting tone characteristic of Mr. Rogers, adoptive children are reassured that they are loved, cherished and above all, normal. I still get tears in my eyes everytime I read it.

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