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Letter from a Stranger

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Overview

#1 bestselling author Barbara Taylor Bradford delivers a sweeping, emotional novel of family secrets and betrayals that lead one woman to her legacy, her destiny, and herself…

Justine Nolan is a documentary filmmaker who lost her cherished grandmother a decade ago—the only source of love and comfort in her life. Her own mother, Deborah, has always been distant, focusing on her career as an interior designer. But when Justine inadvertently opens a letter addressed to her mother, ...

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Overview

#1 bestselling author Barbara Taylor Bradford delivers a sweeping, emotional novel of family secrets and betrayals that lead one woman to her legacy, her destiny, and herself…

Justine Nolan is a documentary filmmaker who lost her cherished grandmother a decade ago—the only source of love and comfort in her life. Her own mother, Deborah, has always been distant, focusing on her career as an interior designer. But when Justine inadvertently opens a letter addressed to her mother, she discovers that not only is her grandmother alive, but that Deborah has deliberately distanced her from the family for all these years. Justine’s search for her grandmother takes her to Istanbul, where she begins to uncover secrets that stretch all the way back to World War II. As layers of deception peel away, Justine begins to understand a woman she never really knew…and she begins to ask questions about the true desires of her own heart.

“Bradford’s characters are so real, readers clamor to know them better.”

USA Today

 

“A master storyteller.”—Pittsburgh Press

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Bradford’s latest (after Playing the Game) is a multigenerational tale set in Connecticut’s exclusive Litchfield Hills, exotic Istanbul, uptown New York, and WWII Germany. Filmmaker Justine Nolan, 32, cuts a sympathetic figure despite being tall, blonde, and successful, because all she’s ever wanted is to enjoy the loving family she was deprived of by the death of her father, her mother’s manipulations, and the disappearance of her beloved grandmother, Gabriele. When Justine opens a letter stating that Gabriele is alive and well in Istanbul, Justine jets off to find her. She reconnects with Gabriele and meets Gabriele’s lifelong friend, Anita, along with Anita’s handsome and savvy grandson, Michael. At this point, Gabriele takes over as heroine, revealing her secret past through diary excerpts. Reading about Gabriele’s trials in Nazi Germany, Justine discovers the extent of her mother’s deceptions, the depth of her grandmother’s suffering, and something about herself as well. In want or in luxury, Bradford characters live in style, from white clapboard houses in Connecticut to Turkish villas overlooking the Bosphorus. Gardens, food, clothing, and accessories—everything in Bradford’s world shows taste. If the plot turns simplistic at times, loyal fans will still tear up at the descriptions of enduring friendship and familial love. Agent: Bradford Enterprises. (Apr.)
From the Publisher
PRAISE FOR BARBARA TAYLOR BRADFORD’S RAVENSCAR SERIES

“Her most exciting series yet...It’s filled with romance, suspense and intrigue, and the richly detailed characters come vibrantly alive as expert pacing captures your attention from the very first page.”—RomanticTimes BOOKreviews, Top Pick

“Rife with dastardly internecine struggles, smoldering illicit passion, and cowardly insidious betrayals…[the Deravenels] pack as much intrigue as any Shakespearean royal drama.”

Booklist on Being Elizabeth

 

 “The queen of the bestseller list still rules with The Heir.”—Miami Herald

Bestseller Bradford’s dynastic epic spanning the 20th century should tide over her fans…”

Publishers Weekly

 

“Bradford’s characters are so real, readers clamor to know them better.”—USA Today

“This expertly crafted epic novel further explores the triumphs and tragedies of the Deravenel family. It will enthrall readers with its vivid characters and fast-paced, larger-than-life plot.”

Romantic Times BOOKreviews (4 ½ stars) on The Heir

The Ravenscar Dynasty has it all—power, betrayal, mystery...The characters are all complex, dynamic, and powerful, leading us through Edward Deravenel’s struggles one exciting step at a time.”—Romance Reviews Today

 

“Bradford’s fiction has long focused on strong heroines who succeed against great odds. Her latest novel, The Ravenscar Dynasty...is the first of a planned trilogy of novels, all destined for best-sellerdom.”—Seattle Post-Intelligencer

 

 

…AND THE NOVELS IN THE ACCLAIMED HARTE SAGA

“The Harte saga is as much a force of nature as a work of fiction…the issues at stake still compel readers after 25 years. Bradford understood early on readers’ hunger for depictions of women who are strong and powerful and whose values embrace family. A quarter-century ago, Emma Harte crossed the no-woman’s-land that once divided family and business, and now generations of readers consider her a role model in their own lives.”—The Washington Post

 

“A truly remarkable conclusion to her beloved Harte family saga…riveting and intense. Not many novels have the ability to completely immerse the reader, but this one draws you into the story from the very first page.”—Romantic Times BOOKreviews on Just Rewards

“Bradford gives her readers more of what she does best—strong, savvy female protagonists who relentlessly pursue great destinies, characters much like the author herself…well-written and full of emotion…completely riveting…the plot, while always complex, has suspenseful moments to keep the pace sharp…good reading…Unexpected Blessings clearly shows why Bradford is still the premier writer of family sagas.”—Miami New Times

Kirkus Reviews
An unexpected letter leads a beautiful documentarian to Turkey, where she reunites with her long-lost grandmother. In a departure from her usual serialized family sagas, Bradford attempts a stand-alone examination of one troubled family, with uneven results. Her willowy blonde protagonist, Justine, is at Indian Ridge, her family's Connecticut vacation manse, when she opens an envelope, with no return address, only an Istanbul postmark, addressed to her mother Deborah (who's in China on business). The letter urges Deborah to end her estrangement from her mother, Gabriele, before Gabriele, nearing 80, dies. Justine is shocked! Ten years before, Deborah, whose venal, narcissistic personality traits are exemplified by her non-willowy figure and brunette hair color, had told Justine and her twin brother Richard that Gabriele was killed in a plane crash. Saying nothing to Deborah, Justine and Richard decide to track down Gabriele. In Istanbul, Justine stumbles on Gabriele and her grandmother's childhood friend Anita (the letter-writer), living in side-by-side villas. Both appear to be in the peak of health and are running a thriving interior design business. (As always, Bradford's descriptions of furnishings, fabrics and amenities are far more rigorous than her exploration of characters' psyches and motivations.) Readers are given to understand that Deborah is entirely at fault for the estrangement--until we learn about its provocation. Not only did Gabriele conceal her controlling interest in Deborah's husband's firm, but Gabriele cut off newly widowed Deborah's income, and put Indian Ridge in trust for the grandchildren, disinheriting Deborah. Nevertheless, Gabriele insists she is the innocent victim of a greedy daughter. Halfway through the novel, the emphasis shifts abruptly from the rift to Gabriele's suppressed World War II trauma, which she has nonetheless detailed in a journal that Justine reads. The journal, depicting actual jeopardy, is the novel's most compelling segment, but it, too, fails to justify Gabriele's actions. Bradford's efforts to assign the moral high ground are doomed to fail, since she can't seem to penetrate her characters' hypocrisy.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780594528890
  • Publisher: St. Martin's Press
  • Publication date: 3/27/2012
  • Pages: 432
  • Sales rank: 181,699
  • Product dimensions: 6.30 (w) x 9.30 (h) x 1.40 (d)

Meet the Author

BARBARA TAYLOR BRADFORD was born and brought up in England, and started her writing career as a journalist. She has written twenty-five international bestsellers. This is her twenty-sixth novel. In 2007, Queen Elizabeth awarded her the Order of the British Empire for her literary achievements. She lives in New York with her husband, TV and film producer Robert Bradford.

 

Biography

Barbara Taylor Bradford was born and raised in Yorkshire, England. A voracious reader since childhood, she took her first job at the age of 15 with the Yorkshire Evening Post and by the age of 18 was the newspaper's women's page editor. Two years later, she headed for London and became a reporter for the London Evening News, Today Magazine, and other publications.

After meeting her husband-to-be, Robert Bradford, in 1961, she relocated to the United States. Continuing in journalism, Barbara created the syndicated column "Designing Woman," which ran nationwide for 12 years. Children's books and 8 works on decorating followed.

In 1979, Bradford published her first novel, A Woman of Substance, introducing the Emma Harte saga and beginning an almost uninterrupted string of bestsellers. Her work has been published in more than 90 countries in 40 languages, and total sales of her books now surpass 75 million.

Barbara now lives and writes in New York City with her husband, Robert. In addition to her work as a writer, she is active in a number of major charitable organizations, including the Police Athletic League, Girls Inc., City-Meals-on-Wheels, and the Susan G. Koman Breast Cancer Foundation.

Good To Know

Queen Elizabeth bestowed the Order of the British Empire on Barbara in October, 2007. The news was announced on the author's website with the following headline: "BTB Gets Her OBE from QEII."

Some interesting outtakes from our interview with Bradford:

"All 20 of my original manuscripts are stored by the prestigious Brotherton Library at Leeds University in England, next to the works of the Brontë sisters."

"My first job was working as a typist for the Yorkshire Evening Post at the age of 15."

"When I'm not writing, (which isn't often) I love to read. Biographies are my favorite genre, though I do like to read fiction to see what others are putting out on the market. Authors whose books I always make time for are Patricia Cornwell, Mary Higgins Clark, and Bernard Cornwell."

"I love to travel whenever possible. Paris is my favorite city to visit, though some of my favorite holidays are spent back in England."

"My husband, Bob, has a vote for the Academy Awards, so I get to see a lot of movie screenings."

"I'm involved in a number of charity organizations on both sides of the Atlantic. From the Police Athletic League and the Literary Guild in America to PACT (Parents and Children Together Again) in the U.K., I devote a fair amount of time to these causes. And as an advocate for world literacy, I am a member of the Madison Council to the Library of Congress in Washington, D.C."

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    1. Hometown:
      New York, New York
    1. Education:
      Christ Church Elementary School and Northcote Private School for Girls in Yorkshire, England
    2. Website:

Read an Excerpt

One
 
 
The view from the second-floor terrace was panoramic, and breathtaking. Justine Nolan, who knew it well, was nevertheless startled when she saw it even after a short absence, and today was no exception.
She leaned against the white-painted wooden railings, gazing out at the sweeping line of the Litchfield Hills flowing toward the distant horizon. Their thickly wooded slopes rolled down to verdant meadows; beyond them Lake Waramaug, set deeply in the valley, shimmered in the sunlight like a great swathe of fabric cut from cloth of silver. As usual, Justine caught her breath, filled with intense pleasure that she was back at Indian Ridge, the house where she had grown up and spent much of her life.
It was a clear bright day, with a blue sky and bountiful clouds, but there was a snap in the wind, a hint of winter still, and it was cold for April.
Shivering, Justine wrapped her heavy-knit red jacket around her body as she continued to devour the view … the white clapboard houses, so typical of Connecticut, dotted here and there on some of the meadows, and to her right, set against a stand of dark green trees, three silos and two red barns grouped together in a distant field. They had been there for as long as she could remember, and were a much-loved and familiar sight.
Unexpectedly, a flock of birds swept past her, unusually close to the railings, and she blinked, startled by them. They soared upward in a vee, a perfect formation and quite beautiful. She stared after them as they flew higher and higher into the haze of blue, and then she turned around and went back into the house.
Picking up her overnight bag, which she had dropped on the landing a few minutes earlier, Justine carried it into her bedroom and immediately unpacked, putting away sweaters, trousers, shoes, and her toilet bag. Ever since childhood she had been neat, very tidy in her habits, and it was her nature to be well organized. She hated clutter, which had to be avoided at all cost.
Glancing around the bedroom, smiling to herself, she experienced a sudden rush of happiness. She loved this room, and the entire house.… Some of her happiest times had been spent here at Indian Ridge, especially when her father was still alive. She and her twin had adored him.
She was glad her mother had kept the house, and that she and her brother Richard could continue to use it at weekends, as well as for long stretches in the summer. It was their mutual escape hatch, a safe haven, and a place where they could relax from their busy schedules in New York.
For the past month Justine had stayed in Manhattan, working on the last stage of her newest documentary about Jean-Marc Breton, the world’s greatest living artist, supervising the cutting with the director and the film’s editor. It had been arduous, long days and nights of work, hours and hours and hours filled with tension, stress, anxiety, good and bad surprises, friction at times, and some disappointments. But when they had viewed the final cut, and not without some trepidation, they had been jubilant. The film, which they had considered to be problematical right from the first day of shooting because of the temperament and dictatorial attitude of their subject, had turned out to be good. Very, very good in fact, much to their collective relief.
Now Justine prayed that the network would feel the same when she screened it for them next week. Miranda Evans, the head of documentaries for Cable News International, would view it with total detachment, which always pleased Justine and her team. Miranda brought no prejudices or preconceived ideas into the screening room, which was why Justine trusted her judgment. That impartiality was a rare quality. Miranda had believed in her right from the start, and had funded most of the blood diamonds documentary, another tough subject.
Suddenly, worry edged into her mind. She took a deep breath and pushed it away. The film was excellent, and it was the final cut. And that was that.
She shook her head, grimaced to herself, wished she could let go of a project the moment it was at an end. But she couldn’t; it always took her time to move on. And then she automatically went into a different mode, was filled with deflation, anxiety, and a sense of loss.
She had mentioned this to Richard last night, and he had started to laugh, understanding exactly what she meant. Her twin and she were very much alike. He had pointed out that she was going up to the house to mentally and physically replenish herself, and fresh and exciting ideas would soon pop into her head when she was completely rested. And with that he had ended their phone call on a somewhat teasing note.
He’s right, of course, she decided, as she went out of her bedroom and down the stairs. Nobody knows me like he does, just as I know him inside out. She felt a small trickle of sadness running through her when she thought of Richard’s wife, Pamela, who had died two years ago of cancer.
To the outside world Richard was calm, strong and stoical, in control, but she knew how heartbroken he was inside. He kept up a good front, and plowed on doggedly, because of his five-year-old daughter, Daisy. Justine planned to look after them both this weekend, mothering one, and being a loving companion to the other.
*   *   *
At the bottom of the staircase Justine turned right, then walked toward the small sitting room overlooking the lawn, which she also used as an office, mostly to do the household accounts and bookkeeping.
She had settled Daisy in there when they had arrived from New York half an hour ago, and her niece was still sitting at the desk with her box of crayons and coloring book spread out before her.
Kim, the nanny, had the weekend off, and Tita, one of the housekeepers, was hovering over her, encouraging her to use as many crayons as she wanted. “All the colors of the rainbow,” Tita was saying, her voice loving.
Afternoon sunshine was streaming into the room and Daisy’s pale blond curls shimmered in the light. What a lovely child she is, Justine thought, adorable in a variety of different ways, and it’s so hard not to spoil her.
Justine couldn’t help smiling to herself as she watched Tita being so attentive to Daisy, helping her. Tita and her sister, Pearl, loved Daisy as if she were their own, and, in a sense, she was. The two women had lived and worked at Indian Ridge for years and were part of the family by now.
Justine and Richard had grown up with them, and they appreciated everything the two of them did to keep the house, the gallery, and their work studios in tip-top shape. They considered themselves blessed to have Tita and Pearl, whom Richard deemed to be the salt of the earth.
Stepping into the room, Justine said, “What are you coloring, Daisy?”
Daisy and Tita both turned around on hearing Justine’s voice, and Daisy explained, “It’s a vase of flowers, Auntie Juju.”
“She takes after her father.” Tita grinned. “She’s got that talent he’s had since he was a boy.”
A small smile struck Justine’s face, and then she laughed. “Unlike the two of us! We weren’t very good painters, were we? Mine were a series of giant blotches.”
Tita joined in her laughter. “And mine, too, and there was more paint on me than the canvas.”
Daisy, staring intently at her aunt, said, “How much does it cost to go there?”
“To go where, darling?”
To Heaven. I want to take my picture to Mommy. I’m doing it for her. I’ve got a lot of quarters in my piggy bank. Maybe ten dollars. It’s a big pig.”
Justine was unable to speak for a moment. Her throat was suddenly constricted. Swallowing several times, she finally managed to say, “It’s a bit more than that, I think.”
“Oh.” Daisy nodded, pursed her lips. “I’ll have to get some more quarters then. I’ll keep the picture for Mommy, and take it to her later. When I’ve saved up.”
“That’s right.” Justine’s low voice sounded hoarse. To her relief Daisy turned back to her coloring book, her blond head bent over it once more in concentration.
The two women exchanged glances.
Tita was on the verge of tears, her dark eyes stricken. She was biting her bottom lip, struggling for control.
Clearing her throat, Justine said, “Come on, Tita, let’s go and plan the picnic for tomorrow.”
“A picnic!” The five-year-old swung her head, her bright blue eyes suddenly sparkling. “In the gazeboat?”
Gazebo, darling,” Justine corrected gently. “And yes, it will be there, weather permitting. And guess what, Auntie Jo is coming with Simon.”
“Oh goody! Simon’s my bestest friend.”
“We’ll be in the kitchen if you need us for anything, Daisy.” Justine beckoned to Tita, who almost ran out of the room ahead of her; she followed in concern.
*   *   *
Tita was clutching the sink, hunched over into herself, still fighting the tears.
Crossing the kitchen quickly, understanding exactly how she felt, Justine put her arms around Tita and held her close. “I know, I know, it’s hard. Some of the things she comes out with take my breath away, tear me apart, and Richard too. But suddenly she brightens up, and you know that, Tita. Especially if she’s distracted. And she does forget.”
“Yes … but I suffer for her. I can’t help it.”
“We’ve got to keep her busy, Tita. Look how she reacted when I mentioned the picnic and Simon. And I’ve learned a lot from Kim, who packs her days with activities, keeps her very busy when she’s not at school. We’ve got to do that this weekend, as we’ve been doing for the last two years, actually.”
“I know, I know—” Tita cut herself off, blew out air, pulled herself together, and said, “I’ll put the kettle on. Let’s have a cup of tea.”
“Good idea.” Justine smiled at Tita, squeezed her arm. “She’ll be all right.”
Tita nodded and went to fill the kettle.
Justine walked over to the fire and stood in front of it, glancing around. The kitchen was a comforting room, warm, inviting, and one of her favorites in the house. Copper pots and pans hanging down from the pot rack affixed to the ceiling gleamed brightly. In between the pots were strings of onions and garlic, bunches of lavender and thyme, whole sausages and salamis, all of which added a French Provençal feeling.
It had always been the hub of the house where everyone congregated, because part of it was furnished as a living room. A sofa and wing chairs, a television set, and a Welsh dresser were all grouped near the fireplace, while a large wood table, which seated ten, was used to divide the room; beyond the table were countertops and the usual appliances. With its terra-cotta tiled floor, pale peach walls, and floral fabrics, the kitchen had a certain charm and a welcoming air about it.
The phone started ringing, and Justine stepped over to the small desk in a corner near the fireplace, and picked up the receiver. “Indian Ridge,” she said, and immediately sat down in the chair when she heard her assistant’s voice. “Hello, Ellen.”
“Hi, Justine. I guess you made it up there in record time.”
“I did. What’s happening?”
“All’s well. I just had a call from Miranda’s PA and she wants to see the film on Tuesday afternoon at four o’clock, instead of Thursday morning. I told her I thought it would be fine, but that I’d better check with you. There’s nothing in your book.”
“I’ve a pretty empty week, I know that. So yes, we’ll screen the film whenever Miranda wants.”
“I’ll confirm it with Angie. Everything’s okay there, I suppose.”
“It is. I’m here with Tita, and Daisy’s busy with her coloring book. I haven’t seen Pearl yet, she went to the market, and apparently Carlos and Ricardo are up on the ridge, working on Richard’s current project.”
“The guest house.”
“Which we don’t really need. On the other hand, he needs it, Ellen, because it gives him work to do up here. It takes his mind off things.”
“There’s still a lot of grief on him,” Ellen murmured. “I wish I knew somebody nice to introduce him to.”
“He wouldn’t be interested, I’m afraid,” Justine shot back. “Anyway, I’ll now come back on Tuesday morning instead of Wednesday. Have a nice weekend, Ellen.”
“And you too.”
As she hung up the phone Justine had no way of knowing that her world, and Richard’s, was about to change forever.

 
Copyright © 2012 by Beaji Enterprises, Inc.

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 3.5
( 22 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(9)

4 Star

(3)

3 Star

(5)

2 Star

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1 Star

(3)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 22 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 6, 2012

    Highly Recommended - I thoroughly enjoyed this story!

    First of all, I love Barbara Taylor Bradford and have thoroughly enjoyed every book she has ever written and this one is no exception. It is an easy read and I really liked the characters and their relationships. Once I started reading "Letter From A Stranger" I just wanted continue reading to the end of the book and put every-thing I was supposed to do as a "domestic engineer" on "hold" - which is exactly what I did! I hope everyone who reads this book enjoys it as much as I did. Happy Reading!!!

    4 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 26, 2012

    Highly Recommended

    This is one of the best books I have ever read by any author. A beautiful, touching tale of ficton, but with a non-fiction base. Can't say enough about how much I truly enjoyed reading "Letter From a Stranger".

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted January 11, 2014

    more from this reviewer

    Reviewed by  Book provided by Get Red PR for review Review origi

    Reviewed by 
    Book provided by Get Red PR for review
    Review originally posted at Romancing the Book

    While enjoying the weekend at her family’s Connecticut home, Indian Ridge, Justine Nolan opens a letter that will change her life and those around her. She learns that her grandmother is alive and did not perish in a plane crash. For the past ten years Justine and her twin brother Richard have grieved the loss of their beloved grandmother Gabrielle. Their mother Deborah purposely had estranged herself and her children from her mother’s life. The twins agree that they must search for their grandmother immediately and Justine leaves for Istanbul to begin the most important journey of her life.

    Letter from a Stranger is a story about loves lost, found and the bonds that hold a family together through the darkest times. The relationship between Justine and her grandmother is touching and emotional. The fact that Justine’s own mother was so distant when she was growing up makes her reunion with Gabri so much sweeter. Finding her grandmother allows Justine to open her heart to find love with a mysterious handsome man. The secondary characters are engaging and interesting. The back-story of Anita Lowe and her friendship with Gabri is fascinating and leaves the reader wanting to learn more about her.

    The most moving part of the story details Gabri’s childhood growing up in Germany during World War II. The description of Germany and Europe during those years was riveting and horrifying. The images conjured with the vivid description of Istanbul are beautiful. The reader can easily picture sitting in a beautiful garden having afternoon tea or shopping in one of the markets. Barbara Taylor Bradford’s Letters from a Stranger is an intriguing story full of romance, secrets, mystery and drama. The book is a slow paced enjoyable read. Grab a cup of tea, a piece of baklava, relax and get lost in Justine’s quest for truth and the magic of Istanbul.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted August 24, 2012

    A little bit of romance

    A letter postmarked from Istanbul arrives at Justine Nolans mothers’ house in Connecticut. Knowing that it will be months before her mom, Deborah, returns, Justine opens the letter. Little did she know how the letter will change her life.

    The letter is written by Justine’s grandmother’s best friend asking for an end to the estrangement between Deborah and Justine’s grandmother, Gabrielle. The letter begs Deborah to let Gabrielle meet her grandkids before it is too late. Justine shares the letter with her fraternal twin, Richard, and it is decided that Justine should travel to Istanbul and find her long lost grandmother.

    Letter from a Stranger was different than any other Barbara Taylor Bradford book I had read. Although it still has a female main character. The descriptions of Istanbul were amazing. I could truly see the scenes as they were told in the story. I could see myself walking the streets of Istanbul during World War II.

    The little bit of romance in the book made it impossible for me to put down. This is definitely a great read and I would easily recommend it to any fellow book lover.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 22, 2012

    I have read several books by Ms. Bradford, "A Woman of Subs

    I have read several books by Ms. Bradford, "A Woman of Substance" being her best. This latest endeavor, however, falls short. The premise of the book is one that could have been written better with a few more twists to the story line and the characters could have been less "plastic". She missed the mark!!! The characters were too carefully portrayed, the dialog seemed forced and in general didn't flow! Of late there have been several stories written about the Holocaust that have been heart wrenching, yet "Letter From A Stranger" does not appear to be one of them. I finished the book mainly because I dislike not doing so, but disappointing to say the least.

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  • Posted July 20, 2012

    Every book that Barbara Taylor Bradford writes is outstanding. S

    Every book that Barbara Taylor Bradford writes is outstanding. She takes you into the book and makes you feel that you are part of it. I've read Woman of Substance several times and every book after that. Enjoyed this book!!!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 22, 2012

    A little kick

    The last 3 chapters were the best part of the book. The rest drug and everyone was too perfect. Are there actually people that act the way these guys did? A little fake but I love the WWII twist

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 3, 2012

    Disappointing and boring. The formal language was a total turn-

    Disappointing and boring. The formal language was a total turn-off. Couldn't wait for it to end.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 29, 2012

    Predictable.

    Disappointing.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted March 30, 2012

    I Also Recommend:

    Have not received this yet as it will not be available till 4/17/2012.

    Will review once received and read.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 6, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted May 28, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted June 25, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted August 14, 2012

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 4, 2013

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 20, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted May 8, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

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    Posted June 28, 2013

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 22, 2013

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted January 2, 2013

    No text was provided for this review.

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