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Letters from a World War II G. I.
     

Letters from a World War II G. I.

by Judith E. Greenberg
 
For readers now, fifty years after the war, Keith Winston's letters form a compelling document--an intimate and dramatic eyewitness view of the war. His early letters tell of the ordeals of basic training; of the camaraderie and humor, and the problems of military life; and of the recruits' fears and their deep commitment to their country and their task.

Overview

For readers now, fifty years after the war, Keith Winston's letters form a compelling document--an intimate and dramatic eyewitness view of the war. His early letters tell of the ordeals of basic training; of the camaraderie and humor, and the problems of military life; and of the recruits' fears and their deep commitment to their country and their task.

Editorial Reviews

School Library Journal - School Library Journal
Gr 8 Up-Private Keith Winston's thoughtful, well-written letters to his wife provide an eye-opening account of what the average World War II GI went through. The letters date from Winston's participation in basic training in March of 1944 to his return to the States in December of 1945. Greenberg and McKeever insert explanations after some of the missives to let readers know what Winston was referring to when he wrote of C rations, victory gardens, etc. While little new information is presented here, it is interesting to see a soldier's point of view, especially in light of subsequent events. For instance, he writes of his admiration for the Russians, revealing that the Cold War was still an inconceivable notion to the average American. The black-and-white photographs of soldiers, Red Cross workers, etc. are informative; the index is good; and the list for further reading is excellent.-Margaret B. Rafferty, Gwinnett-Forsyth Regional Library, GA
Debbie Carton
A collection of letters home from U.S. Army private Keith Winston, this book speaks eloquently and directly to the hardships of life as a soldier. The editors provide introductory remarks and a few explanatory notes but wisely let the letters speak for themselves. Winston's homesickness and longing for his wife and two young sons are painfully obvious in the chronologically arranged letters, which follow the writer from his induction to his return home. Equally moving is Winston's reaction to the horrors of war, not just to the battlefield where he served as a medic, but also to the decimation of once beautiful cities and to the poverty and starvation he witnessed. The notes are not always adequate (for example, the editors mention the segregated African American troops but not the segregated Japanese American ones), and the photos, which seem at first to lend a nice touch, are actually unrelated to Keith Winston's personal story. As a whole, however, this is an excellent addition to primary source materials on World War II, presenting a moving, accurate picture of the emotional impact of the war. A list of further readings is appended.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780531112120
Publisher:
Scholastic Library Publishing
Publication date:
03/28/1995
Series:
In Their Own Words Series
Pages:
144
Product dimensions:
6.28(w) x 9.33(h) x 0.65(d)
Age Range:
13 - 17 Years

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