Letters from the American Desert [NOOK Book]

Overview

In Letters from the American Desert, Glaysher reflects on the cultural, political, and religious history of Western and non-Western civilizations, pondering the dilemmas of postmodernity.

Fully cognizant of the relativism and nihilism of modern life, Glaysher finds a deeper meaning and purpose for the individual and the world community in the writings and global vision of Baha'u'llah, as expressed in "The Universal Principles of the Reform ...
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Letters from the American Desert

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Overview

In Letters from the American Desert, Glaysher reflects on the cultural, political, and religious history of Western and non-Western civilizations, pondering the dilemmas of postmodernity.

Fully cognizant of the relativism and nihilism of modern life, Glaysher finds a deeper meaning and purpose for the individual and the world community in the writings and global vision of Baha'u'llah, as expressed in "The Universal Principles of the Reform Bahai Faith." Confronting the antinomies of the soul, grounded in the dialectic, Glaysher charts a path beyond the postmodern desert.

Alluding to Martin Luther and W. B. Yeats at All Souls Chapel, "metaphors for poetry," Glaysher meditates on the universal, moderate form of the Bahai Teachings as interpreted by Abdul-Baha, who had spoken throughout the West in Europe, England, and the United States from 1911 to 1913. Abdul-Baha's message of the oneness of God, all religions, and humankind holds out a new hope and vision for a world in spiritual and global crisis.

Far from a theocracy, the Reform Bahai Faith envisions a separation of church and state as the will of God, in harmony and balance with universal peace, in a global age of permanent pluralism, in a world of multiplicity, where religion is a distinctive mark of the individual, not of collective, communal identity.
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Editorial Reviews

Forum - Reform Bahai Faith
"Riveting! I was unable to put it down until completion in the wee hours. As the journey of the writer took many years to complete, it reminded me, too, of my Bahai journey.... Strangely, I had never remembered seeing Abdu'-Baha's 1912 Covenant, anywhere. Where was it hidden? Is there more such documented evidence being suppressed?"
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780967042169
  • Publisher: Earthrise Press
  • Publication date: 10/6/2010
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 172
  • File size: 2 MB

Meet the Author

Frederick Glaysher studied writing under a private tutorial, at the University of Michigan, with the poet Robert Hayden and edited both Hayden’s Collected Prose (University of Michigan Press) and his Collected Poems (Liveright). He holds a bachelor’s and a master’s degree from the University of Michigan, the latter in English. At the college and university level, he taught American and non-Western literature, world religions, etc., for ten years.

Mr. Glaysher lived for more than fifteen years outside Michigan—in Japan, where he taught at Gunma University in Maebashi; in Arizona, on the Colorado River Indian Tribes Reservation, site of one of the largest internment camps for Japanese-Americans during WWII; in Illinois, on the central farmlands and on the Mississippi; ultimately returning to his suburban hometown of Rochester. He has been a Fulbright-Hays and NEA scholar on China and India and has traveled and studied throughout China.
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Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 9, 2008

    Beyond Postmodernism

    Frederick Glaysher invokes a global vision beyond the prevailing conceptions entrenched in postmodernism and postmodernity. In Letters from the American Desert, Glaysher reflects on the cultural, political, and religious history of Western and non-Western civilizations, pondering the dilemmas of postmodernity, in a compelling struggle for spiritual knowledge and truth. Fully cognizant of the relativism and nihilism of modern life, Glaysher finds a deeper meaning and purpose for the individual and the world community in the writings and global vision of Baha¿u¿llah, as expressed in the Reform Bahai Faith. Confronting the antinomies of the soul, grounded in the dialectic, Glaysher charts a path beyond the postmodern desert. Alluding to Martin Luther and W. B. Yeats at All Souls Chapel, Glaysher calls Reform Bahais and others to consider the universal, moderate form of the Bahai Teachings as interpreted by Abdu¿l-Baha, Baha¿u¿llah¿s son, who had spoken throughout the West in Europe, England, and the United States from 1911 to 1913. Abdu¿l-Baha¿s message of the oneness of God, all religions, and humankind holds out a new hope and vision for a world in spiritual and global crisis. Far from a theocracy, the Reform Bahai Faith envisions a modest separation of church and state as the will of God, in harmony and balance with universal peace, in a global age of pluralism.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
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