Letters of a Woman Homesteader

Letters of a Woman Homesteader

3.7 35
by Elinore Pruitt Stewart, N. C. Wyeth
     
 

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First published in 1914, this remarkable first-person account gives us new insight into life on the prairie. Elinore Pruitt lost her husband in a railroad accident and went west with her two-year-old daughter to seek employment. She took what was available, cleaning homes and laundering clothes. But finally she was offered a permanent position in Wyoming with a…  See more details below

Overview

First published in 1914, this remarkable first-person account gives us new insight into life on the prairie. Elinore Pruitt lost her husband in a railroad accident and went west with her two-year-old daughter to seek employment. She took what was available, cleaning homes and laundering clothes. But finally she was offered a permanent position in Wyoming with a wealthy Scottish cattleman, whom she married. From this new home, she wrote these collected letters to a former employer in Denver. Filled with warmth, wit, and memorable characters, Stewart's correspondence tells a story of hard work that leads in the end to success.

"A warmly delightful, vigorously affirmative chronicle . . . We part from this gallant woman with respect and affection." (The Wall Street Journal)

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
George provides biographical insight into the author of the 1914 pioneer classic Letters of a Woman Homesteader , giving a detailed presentation of Stewart's previously uncollected letters. Photos. (Sept.)
School Library Journal
Gr 7 Up-After deciding that city life as a laundress wasn't for her, Elinore Pruitt, a young widowed mother, accepted an offer to assist with a ranch in Wyoming, work that she found exceedingly more rewarding. In this delightful collection of letters, she describes these experiences to her former employer, Mrs. Coney. Pruitt's charming descriptions of work, travels, neighbors, animals, land and sky have an authentic feel. The West comes alive, and everyday life becomes captivating. Her writing is clear, witty, and entertaining. The 26 letters are brief and tell about her life on the ranch in the early 1900s. The author frequently and unnecessarily apologizes for being too wordy; she begs forgiveness for many "faults," like being forgetful, ungrateful, inconsistent and indifferent, all without apparent cause. On occasion, language reflects the racial prejudice of the time. Many times, Pruitt attempts to portray the culturally diverse characters she meets by writing their various dialects as they sound. Kate Fleming's narration is as smooth as the writing, perfectly transitioning from one accent to the next. She reads with a calm, down-to-earth tone, which suits the writing well.-Kariana Cullen Gonzales, Lincoln Consolidated High School, Ypsilanti, MI Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.
The Wall Street Journal

Warmly delightful, vigorously affirmative.
New York Times Book Review

"Authentic records of Western ranch life—and more, for Mrs. Stewart had a born writer's talent."—New York Times Book Review
Western American Literature

"Mrs. Stewart was a woman whose nineteenth-century pioneer spirit seems to have been laced with a strong dose of twentieth-century liberation. Equally impressive is her ability to characterize the people around her."—Ann Ronald, Western American Literature

— Ann Ronald

Wyoming Horizons Magazine

"The letters show how important women were in frontier development. [Elinore Stewart's] energy, good works, sense of humor, courage, common sense, and humility win our admiration."—T. A. Larson, Wyoming Horizons Magazine

— T. A. Larson

Western American Literature - Ann Ronald

"Mrs. Stewart was a woman whose nineteenth-century pioneer spirit seems to have been laced with a strong dose of twentieth-century liberation. Equally impressive is her ability to characterize the people around her."—Ann Ronald, Western American Literature
Wyoming Horizons Magazine - T. A. Larson

"The letters show how important women were in frontier development. [Elinore Stewart's] energy, good works, sense of humor, courage, common sense, and humility win our admiration."—T. A. Larson, Wyoming Horizons Magazine
From the Publisher

"Full of the tang of the prairies and of a delightful personality." The New York Times

"Warmly delightful, vigorously affirmative," The Wall Street Journal

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781162773490
Publisher:
Kessinger Publishing Company
Publication date:
09/10/2010
Pages:
300
Product dimensions:
9.00(w) x 6.00(h) x 0.63(d)

Meet the Author


Elinore Pruitt Stewart was born in 1878. Letters of a Woman Homesteader, first published in 1914, inspired the critically acclaimed movie Heartland.

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Letters of a Woman Homesteader 3.7 out of 5 based on 1 ratings. 35 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Amazing, surprising account of one woman's adventure in the raw and cold west. The writing is so simple, with subtle emotion, powerful description, and the friendly voice of a woman writing home to an old friend.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I'd seen the movie "Heartland" which is based on this book so I was so very excited to finally find it. the book did not disappoint. I could not put it down and was sorry when I came to the end.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book is really good! I think every girl should read this!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
You must love the old days in order to love this book of letters. It is just a series of letters but they are like little stories. It was such a joy to read her letters. Those were the days when work was hard and neighbors were usually friendly and the wilderness had beauty. Those were the days when writing was not just important communication but really talking with each other through their letters - a lost art today.
Anonymous 10 months ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Letters with stamps, stationary,beautiful handwritting . E mail is just o k . It used to be so fun to get a letter in the mail...she writes wonderfully discriptive letters. Today writing (and spelling) is a lost art.
JEL More than 1 year ago
Tough woman, Good story, and I know the kind of situations.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Read this diary on-line on a desktop computer years ago. When the disk crashed discovered I didn't back it up. Glad to get a copy for the Nook. HS student used it for social studies and US history. Many of this type of diary used to be free to read on the Web but have since been withdrawn. Book is a window into a woman's life during the early settlement of the western US by easterners.
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As i am moving to Wyoming in a few weeks. This was the perfect book to read. True stories of a woman homesteader of the old west. Now I cant wait to go!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This was a really good read. Very interesting lookingninto someones life like that
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