Lewis and Clark and the Indian Country: The Native American Perspective

Lewis and Clark and the Indian Country: The Native American Perspective

by Frederick E Hoxie
     
 

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A fascinating presentation of the longterm impact of Lewis and Clark expeditions on the "Indian Country" and its residents, this volume includes compelling interviews conducted with Native Americans over the past two centuries, secondary literature, Lewis and Clark travel journal entries, and other primary sources. Rich stories of Native Americans, travelers, ranchers…  See more details below

Overview

A fascinating presentation of the longterm impact of Lewis and Clark expeditions on the "Indian Country" and its residents, this volume includes compelling interviews conducted with Native Americans over the past two centuries, secondary literature, Lewis and Clark travel journal entries, and other primary sources. Rich stories of Native Americans, travelers, ranchers, fur traders, teachers, and missionaries-often in conflict with each other- illustrate complex interactions between settlers and tribal people. In widening the reader's interpretive lens to include many perspectives, this collection reaches beyond individual experience to appreciate America's plural past.

Editorial Reviews

Library Journal

The 200th anniversary of the Lewis and Clark expedition in 2004 spawned the publication of so many monographs and articles that it would be easy now to overlook a true gem, such as this, that makes a unique contribution to the subject. Edited by Hoxie (history, Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign) and Nelson (program asst., D'Arcy McNickle Ctr. for American Indian History, Newberry Lib.), this work, based on the Newberry's exhibit of the same name, presents a plethora of views drawn from sources such as personal interviews, travel journals, and diaries over the last two centuries that provide insights into the manner in which the Corps of Discovery impacted the long-term development of the West. This approach results in a nuanced collection of essays that highlights both the positive and the negative impacts of the expedition and how the perception of those very repercussions has evolved. This collection should be read alongside Lewis and Clark Through Indian Eyes, edited by Alvin M. Josephy Jr. with Marc Jaffe. Both volumes are recommended for public and academic libraries.
—John Burch

From the Publisher

"Successfully places the famous expedition within the broader context of a continental struggle over sovereignty and cultural power. . . . A must read for scholars in Native American history, the history of the trans-Mississippi West, and ethnohistory. Essential."—Choice

"This collection of essays and documents is a unique, authentic, and fascinating source for the study of history and is recommended for academic libraries and Native American studies classes in colleges and universities."—Multicultural Review

"Hoxie and Nelson strive to step beyond the typically reverential fervor of bicentennial celebrations, including those of the Lewis and Clark Expedition. . . . The essays in this collection, then, represent an eclectic swath of topics and sources. . . . An excellent resource for both serious students and scholars of the American West."—Journal of Illinois History

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780252074851
Publisher:
University of Illinois Press
Publication date:
12/28/2007
Pages:
376
Sales rank:
1,128,033
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 1.00(d)

Meet the Author

Frederick E. Hoxie is Swanlund Professor of History at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, and the author of several books, including The People: A History of Native America. Jay T. Nelson is a program assistant at the D'Arcy McNickle Center for American Indian History, the Newberry Library.

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