Leyte, 1944: The Soldiers' Battle

( 2 )

Overview

When General Douglas MacArthur arrived in Australia in March 1942, having successfully left the Philippines to organize a new American army, he vowed, "I shall return!" More than two years later he did return, at the head of a large U.S. army to retake the Philippines from the Japanese. The place of his re-invasion was the central Philippine Island of Leyte. Much has been written about the naval Battle of Leyte Gulf that his return provoked, but almost nothing has been written ...
See more details below
Hardcover
$23.02
BN.com price
(Save 30%)$32.95 List Price

Pick Up In Store

Reserve and pick up in 60 minutes at your local store

Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (13) from $14.75   
  • New (8) from $19.87   
  • Used (5) from $14.75   
Leyte, 1944: The Soldiers' Battle

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • NOOK HD/HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK Study
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$12.99
BN.com price
(Save 40%)$21.95 List Price

Overview

When General Douglas MacArthur arrived in Australia in March 1942, having successfully left the Philippines to organize a new American army, he vowed, "I shall return!" More than two years later he did return, at the head of a large U.S. army to retake the Philippines from the Japanese. The place of his re-invasion was the central Philippine Island of Leyte. Much has been written about the naval Battle of Leyte Gulf that his return provoked, but almost nothing has been written about the three-month long battle to seize Leyte itself.

Originally intending to delay the advancing Americans, the Japanese high command decided to make Leyte the "Decisive Battle" for the western Pacific and rushed crack Imperial Army units from Manchuria, Korea, and Japan itself to halt and then overwhelm the Americans on Leyte. As were most battles in the Pacific, it was a long, bloody, and brutal fight. As did the Japanese, the Americans were forced to rush in reinforcements to compensate for the rapid increase in Japanese forces on Leyte.

This unique battle also saw a major Japanese counterattack—not a banzai charge, but a carefully thought-out counteroffensive designed to push the Americans off the island and capture the elusive General MacArthur. Both American and Japanese battalions spent days surrounded by the enemy, often until relieved or overwhelmed. Under General Yamashita’s guidance it also saw a rare deployment of Japanese paratroopers in conjunction with the ground assault offensive.

Finally there were more naval and air battles, all designed to protect or cover landing operations of friendly forces. Leyte was a three-dimensional battle, fought with the best both sides had to offer, and did indeed decide the fate of the Philippines in World War II.

REVIEWS

“…a highly detailed account of the ground fighting on Leyte from October 1944 through the spring of 1945…a comprehensive eye level picture of the fierce combat and the outstanding heroism of the soldiers who fought there”
ARMY Magazine

"Finally, a definitive account of the battle that wrested the island of Leyte in the Philippines from the Japanese in 1944 has emerged. Although much has been written about the U. S. Navy's role at Leyte, the savage, bloody fighting that took place on land has been overlooked. Fulfilling his pledge to return after he had been forced to leave the Philippines by PT-boat in early 1942, General Douglas MacArthur pushed the idea of a return to the Philippines with the Joint Chiefs and President Franklin Roosevelt. MacArthur's persistence paid off as soldiers from the Sixth Army, aided by Filipino Guerillas, fought the Japanese from late October 1944 until the beginning of 1945. More than 200,000 Americans not only fought a seasoned enemy but had to endure harsh tropical weather with its incessant monsoon rains and typhoons as well. Two prominent officers who deserve the lion's share of the accolades are General Walter Krueger, commanding the Sixth Army, and General Roberrt Eichelberger, leading the Eighth Army. Both had battlefield experience and did a marvelous job as their troops fought at places with names such as Breakneck Ridge, Shoestring Ridge and Ormoc Valley. In a highly unusual move, the Japanese used airborne infantry to parachute behind the American lines to disrupt the flow of supplies and conduct raids. Prefer has penned a meticulous book, complete with the order of battle for each side, a breakdown of U. S. casualties, detailed maps, and 16 photographs. It is a fitting story chronicling the bravery and sacrifices of the dogface GI, and the nearly 3,500 killed and another 10,000 wounded, who beat the very best that the enemy could throw at them and freed the inhabitants of Leyte from a brutal occupation.
WWII Magazine

“…nicely crafted series of stories that focus on acts of bravery and leadership as practiced by American infantrymen in face-to-face encounters with the Japanese. His stories put the reader in the front lines with American officers, NCOs, and enlisted men as they encounter and overcome strong Japanese defensive positions, deal with snipers and raiding parties, and resist Japanese counterattacks…”
Journal of America’s Military Past

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

ARMY Magazine
...a highly detailed account of the ground fighting on Leyte from October 1944 through the spring of 1945…a comprehensive eye level picture of the fierce combat and the outstanding heroism of the soldiers who fought there.
WWII Magazine
Finally, a definitive account of the battle that wrested the island of Leyte in the Philippines from the Japanese in 1944 has emerged. Although much has been written about the U. S. Navy's role at Leyte, the savage, bloody fighting that took place on land has been overlooked... Prefer has penned a meticulous book, complete with the order of battle for each side, a breakdown of U. S. casualties, detailed maps, and 16 photographs. It is a fitting story chronicling the bravery and sacrifices of the dogface GI, and the nearly 3,500 killed and another 10,000 wounded, who beat the very best that the enemy could throw at them and freed the inhabitants of Leyte from a brutal occupation.
Journal of America's Military Past
"...nicely crafted series of stories that focus on acts of bravery and leadership as practiced by American infantrymen in face-to-face encounters with the Japanese. His stories put the reader in the front lines with American officers, NCOs, and enlisted men as they encounter and overcome strong Japanese defensive positions, deal with snipers and raiding parties, and resist Japanese counterattacks."
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781612001555
  • Publisher: Casemate Publishers
  • Publication date: 12/17/2012
  • Pages: 424
  • Sales rank: 450,305
  • Product dimensions: 6.30 (w) x 9.10 (h) x 1.50 (d)

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 1.5
( 2 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(1)

1 Star

(1)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 24, 2013

    This effort adds nothing new to the subject matter regarding Ope

    This effort adds nothing new to the subject matter regarding Operation King II. There is scant attention paid to the Japanese side of the campaign, which I find unforgivable given the passage of time and access to long available Japanese sources. The Army Official History is still the best source for this overlooked campaign.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted August 26, 2013

    Don' bother

    This book is a jumble of information. The writer assumes that you have the complete knowledge of the Infantry Regiments involved in the battles and bounces back and fourth between them which in this case left this reader confused. His writing about the 77th Infantry Division which I am familiar with contains many errors. This leads me to question many of his other facts.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)