Liars and Heaps: New Essays on Paradox

Overview

Logic is fundamental to thought and language. But which logical principles are correct? The paradoxes play a crucial role in answering that question. The so-called Liar and Heap paradoxes challenge our basic ideas about logic; at the very least, they teach us that the correct logical principles are not as obvious as common sense would have it. The essays in this volume, written by leading figures in the field, discuss novel thoughts about the paradoxes.

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Overview

Logic is fundamental to thought and language. But which logical principles are correct? The paradoxes play a crucial role in answering that question. The so-called Liar and Heap paradoxes challenge our basic ideas about logic; at the very least, they teach us that the correct logical principles are not as obvious as common sense would have it. The essays in this volume, written by leading figures in the field, discuss novel thoughts about the paradoxes.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780199264810
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press
  • Publication date: 2/26/2004
  • Pages: 384
  • Product dimensions: 9.10 (w) x 6.10 (h) x 0.80 (d)

Table of Contents

Part I: Soritical Paradoxes
1. A Site for Sorites, Graham Priest
2. Cut-Offs and their Neighbours, Achille C. Varzi
3. Vagueness and Conversation, Stewart Shapiro
4. Context, Vagueness, and the Sorites, Rosanna Keefe
5. Vagueness: A Fifth Column Approach, Crispin Wright
6. Semantic Accounts of Vagueness, Richard G. Heck, Jr.
7. Higher-Order Vagueness for Partially Defined Predicates, Scott Soames
8. Against Truth-Value Gaps, Michael Glanzberg
9. Gap Principles, Penumbral Consequence, and Infinitely Higher-Order Vagueness, Delia Graff
Part II: Semantic Paradoxes
10. A Definite No-No, Roy A. Sorensen
11. Reference and Paradox, Keith Simmons
12. On the Singularity Theory of Denotation, J. C. Beall
13. The Semantic Paradoxes and the Paradoxes of Vagueness, Hartry Field
14. New Grounds for Naive Truth Theory, Stephen Yablo
15. A Completeness Theorem for Unrestricted First-Order Languages, Agustin Rayo and Timothy Williamson
16. Universal Universal Quantification, Vann McGee

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