Liberating Learning: Technology, Politics, and the Future of American Education

Overview

"Terry M. Moe and John E. Chubb tell a dramatic story about the pitched battle to bring about real change and improvement to America's schools - a battle that pits the innovative forces of technology against the entrenched interests that powerfully protect the educational status quo." Controversial and compelling, Liberating Learning maps out a dynamic vision of the nation's educational future, showing how the ideas and innovations of technology will ultimately transform the public schools to the great benefit of the nation and its children - and ...
See more details below
Hardcover
$17.83
BN.com price
(Save 28%)$24.95 List Price

Pick Up In Store

Reserve and pick up in 60 minutes at your local store

Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (31) from $1.99   
  • New (8) from $3.86   
  • Used (23) from $1.99   

Overview

"Terry M. Moe and John E. Chubb tell a dramatic story about the pitched battle to bring about real change and improvement to America's schools - a battle that pits the innovative forces of technology against the entrenched interests that powerfully protect the educational status quo." Controversial and compelling, Liberating Learning maps out a dynamic vision of the nation's educational future, showing how the ideas and innovations of technology will ultimately transform the public schools to the great benefit of the nation and its children - and how learning will be liberated from the special interests, and from the dead hand of the past.
Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
In this follow up to the authors' Politics, Markets, and American Schools, Moe and Chubb "think of public education not as the current institution, but in terms of its vital responsibility," in which case "technology promises to be a very good thing." When focused on this thesis, the Hoover Institution associates (Moe is a political science professor, Chubb founded an education consulting group) make a consistently intriguing case-not just for computers in the classroom, but for a full-scale system revamp. Unfortunately, they spend much time blaming teachers and teachers' unions for standing in the way, and fail repeatedly to address the realities of teaching. Many of the authors' assumptions will strike elementary educators as plainly wrong; for example, the idea that "computer-based approaches... simply require far fewer teachers per student" ignores the fact that teenagers can rarely be counted on to do what they're asked. It's also highly unlikely that parental demand will bring about a merit pay system; any school teacher will tell you that parental disinterest or neglect is rampant. Finally, and most distressingly, Moe and Chubb seem oblivious to the challenges poverty presents. Unfortunately, shallow thinking and a seeming lack of real classroom experience short circuit an important topic.
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Library Journal
Moe (political science, Stanford Univ.) and Chubb (founder, EdisonLearning) provide yet another look at how to improve the American educational system. Technology, they write, has changed most major aspects of American society, but not today's classrooms, which look much as they did 50 years ago. The authors prescribe technology as the answer to improving U.S. education, along with freeing the system from the grip of special interests and entrenched politics. Until schools are free to experiment with technology and can experiment without interference from the government, teachers' unions, and other vested interests, educational reform will not get very far. The authors support their claims with well-documented examples; a final chapter gives their prescription for real change in American education. The book is thoughtfully written and with well-defended arguments. However, on an issue that's been discussed for years this book doesn't really cover any new ground. Conservative thinkers (pro-autonomy, pro-technology) will agree with the conclusions, while more liberal researchers will argue against them. VERDICT The book is recommended for those studying or working in our educational system because even though it doesn't provide many new arguments, it strongly defends existing arguments.—Mark Bay, Univ. of the Cumberlands Lib., Williamsburg, KY
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780470442142
  • Publisher: Wiley
  • Publication date: 4/27/2009
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 240
  • Sales rank: 938,300
  • Product dimensions: 6.20 (w) x 9.10 (h) x 1.00 (d)

Table of Contents

1 The Seeds of Change 1

2 The Need for Achievement 13

3 The Politics of Blocking 29

4 Technology on All Fronts 57

5 The Resistance 99

6 A New Era 149

Notes 185

Index 215

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 24, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.


If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)