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Liberation Transmission

( 4 )

Editorial Reviews

Barnes & Noble - David Sprague
This Welsh sextet have never been short on attitude or riffs, as borne out by two previous outings that seamlessly conjoined ghosts of emo and nu-metal, past and present. But on Liberation Transmission, they've finally turned that mastery of form into a thoroughly compelling set of songs that stick in the head long after the disc is back on the shelf. Songs like "A Town Called Hypocrisy," one of a few tracks to incorporate a swinging, groove-conscious bottom end, bring to mind London Calling-era Clash, a comparison that extends to frontman Ian Watkins's belligerent lyrical stance. Watkins is no Joe Strummer, mind you, but he does muster up enough balled-fist rage to ...
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Editorial Reviews

Barnes & Noble - David Sprague
This Welsh sextet have never been short on attitude or riffs, as borne out by two previous outings that seamlessly conjoined ghosts of emo and nu-metal, past and present. But on Liberation Transmission, they've finally turned that mastery of form into a thoroughly compelling set of songs that stick in the head long after the disc is back on the shelf. Songs like "A Town Called Hypocrisy," one of a few tracks to incorporate a swinging, groove-conscious bottom end, bring to mind London Calling-era Clash, a comparison that extends to frontman Ian Watkins's belligerent lyrical stance. Watkins is no Joe Strummer, mind you, but he does muster up enough balled-fist rage to make "Rooftops" -- a jut-jawed anthem about refusing to go quietly into the conformity of nine-to-five life -- all but impossible to deny. Many of Liberation Transmission's tracks are so steadfastly anthemic -- from the pro-feminist nod "Can't Stop, Gotta Date with Hate" to the careening "Can't Catch Tomorrow" -- that the disc becomes something of an emotional workout. That's balanced out, however, by Lostprophets' decision to replace the mannered rap workouts that bogged down past releases with shiny if not necessarily happy guitar lines that range from the bruising "Everyday Combat" to caressing "Broken Hearts, Torn Up Letters and the Story of a Lonely Girl". It may not be the feel-good album of the summer, but it's guaranteed to make you feel.
All Music Guide - Corey Apar
Liberation Transmission is the third effort from Lostprophets, though it's debatable whether many (at least stateside) remember much of the Wales post-grunge troupe outside of the massive success of their 2004 single "Last Train Home." The band is down to five players this time around, following the 2005 departure of drummer Mike Chiplin, but with the enrollment of Josh Freese (the Vandals, A Perfect Circle, etc. etc) behind the drum kit, you can be assured the rhythm section's backbone is adequately covered. For much of the album -- from its red/black/white color scheme and extended song titles to the band's newly austere yet fashionable images -- Lostprophets seem to be musically capitalizing on the sonic guitar-driven splendor that initially thrust them into the public's eye, while visually appealing more to fans beyond the confines of the Hoobastank/ Linkin Park crowd. In conjunction with the aforementioned color palate, there's an underlying war-torn theme of bleak, frustrated, and fed up sentiments propelling the vaguely anti-militaristic feeling of early songs. And even if the band's motivations don't appear to be politically driven all the way through, they still seem to be relying on a general life disillusionment to rally behind with a resounding cry. Tracks like the urgent fury of "Everyday Combat" and the impassioned "For All These Times Son, For All These Times" are guitar-crashing, keyboard-laced explosions of sound amid a steady backdrop of emphatic background vocals. But then they throw in numbers like the playful bounce of "Can't Catch Tomorrow (Good Shoes Won't Save You This Time)" and the slight funk-groove of "A Town Called Hypocrisy" to show a bit more welcomed flexibility than just brash, bottled aggression. Empowered lead single "Rooftops (A Liberation Broadcast)" is definitely trying to re-create the magic of "Last Train Home"; while it comes close in its opening reliance on the more fragile edge of Ian Watkins' voice, the eventual buildup into surging chorus never quite reaches that lofty level of cathartic explosion, even in its proclamations of "Standing on the rooftops/Everybody scream your heart out/This is all we got." Though really, that song speaks for the rest of the album. Even with its stirring moments -- compared to their contemporaries there is much variety here to enjoy -- Liberation Transmission seems to find Lostprophets trying harder to re-create their sound instead of pushing it forward.
The Guardian - Caroline Sullivan
If they're going to ascend to big-name status, this third release, their most punkily accessible yet, will be the one that does it.

If they're going to ascend to big-name status, this third release, their most punkily accessible yet, will be the one that does it.
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Product Details

  • Release Date: 6/27/2006
  • Label: Sony
  • UPC: 827969653128
  • Catalog Number: 96531
  • Sales rank: 63,360

Album Credits

Performance Credits
Lostprophets Primary Artist
Ilan Rubin Drums
Jamie Oliver Group Member
Lee Gaze Group Member
Stuart Richardson Group Member
Technical Credits
George Marino Mastering
Bob Rock Producer, Engineer, Audio Production
Lostprophets Composer
Eric Helmkamp Engineer
Ian Watkins Composer
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 4 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(2)

4 Star

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(1)

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Sort by: Showing all of 4 Customer Reviews
  • Posted October 1, 2010

    I Also Recommend:

    Very catchy album

    I was unfamiliar with this band when I had first bought the album. I bought because the music producing god, Bob Rock, had produced the album. From the start, the music makes you want to start dancing, it's very catchy and dace able. The songs do start to sound the same as it progresses, making moments boring. They have that poppy sound to them but at the same time they can rock out as well. I wasn't too pleased with my purchase because they do sound like a lot of other bands in their same genre. If you like the genre though, you should add this one to your collection.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    Nowhere close to the old stuff

    Okay, I was very excited for this cd. Lostprophets' previous albums, The Fake Sound of Progress and Start Something are fantastic. The band has now lightened up their music and there is really only one "hard" song on the album, Everday Combat. So, if you are a fan of the screaming metal-like old sounds of Lostprophets, avoid the album. If you enjoy your rock to have a pop sound to it, pick it up. You'll enjoy it.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    Very Impressive

    Liberation Transmission is a lot better than Start Something. All the songs are really good if you're into this kind of music. I think Lostprophets has a very bright future in the music business if they'd tour in America a little more.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 26, 2008

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 4 Customer Reviews