Liberia

Liberia

by Brian Baughan
     
 

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The early history of Liberia was promising. Under the auspices of white Americans, freed slaves had been offered a new home in the West African region during the early 19th century. In 1847 the settlers founded the continent's first independent republic-a full century before the rest of Africa began to shake off colonial rule.

Although the new republic modeled

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Overview

The early history of Liberia was promising. Under the auspices of white Americans, freed slaves had been offered a new home in the West African region during the early 19th century. In 1847 the settlers founded the continent's first independent republic-a full century before the rest of Africa began to shake off colonial rule.

Although the new republic modeled itself on the United States-and even named its cities after U.S. leaders-it has nevertheless endured sluggish development, class division, and a brutal civil war during the 1990s that resulted in 200,000 deaths. In their struggle for stability, the Liberian people have forged peace agreements between the warring political parties and established a new, freely elected government in 2006, becoming the first African country to elect a woman as president.

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Kris Sauer
Given that Liberia was founded by former American slaves and sympathetic abolitionists and has a form of government modeled after the United States' division of powers, one could be forgiven for thinking that the city has much going for it. Sadly, despite its early positive beginnings—including several cities named after American leaders—Liberia, like so many of its fellow African nations, has been victimized by despot governments, horrific civil war, and poverty few can escape. Home to the infamous killer and child-soldier recruiter Charles Taylor, Liberia has seen its share of troubles. Embargoes on its key lumber and diamond trades during the years of civil war cut off any economic development then. Fortunately, with the civil war resolved, the fate of Liberia seems to be turning. In 2006, the country ushered in a new era marked by a freely-elected government led by Africa's first female president. While the road to stability is difficult at best, President Ellen Johnson-Sirleaf seems to have this country back on the right track. Under the guidance of Senior Consulting Editor Robert I. Rotberg, Director of the Program of Instrastate Conflict & Conflict Resolution at Harvard University's Kennedy School, this book is both well-written and succinct in telling of the development, history, economy, and demographics of this African nation. Part of the 26-title "The Evolution of Africa's Major Nations" series, this book includes a glossary, an index, and a bibliography. An added bonus is the inclusion of a calendar of Liberian festivals, traditional Liberian recipes, and a list of suggested project and report ideas for delving deeper into this topic. Students will breeze through this book without even realizing how much they are learning in the process. Reviewer: Kris Sauer

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781422221983
Publisher:
Mason Crest Publishers
Publication date:
01/28/2012
Series:
Evolution of Africa's Major Nations Series
Pages:
87
Sales rank:
1,165,933
Product dimensions:
8.26(w) x 8.12(h) x 0.33(d)
Lexile:
NC1330L (what's this?)
Age Range:
10 - 13 Years

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