Liberty!
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  • Liberty!
  • Liberty!
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Liberty!

by Allan Drummond
     
 

A symbol of freedom – the Statue of Liberty

Here is the story of the exciting day in 1886 when the Statue of Liberty was unveiled to the world. A small boy stands at the foot of the statue, ready to relay a signal to its creator way up in Liberty’s crown, telling him it is time. As anticipation builds, the boy describes the bustling scene in

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Overview

A symbol of freedom – the Statue of Liberty

Here is the story of the exciting day in 1886 when the Statue of Liberty was unveiled to the world. A small boy stands at the foot of the statue, ready to relay a signal to its creator way up in Liberty’s crown, telling him it is time. As anticipation builds, the boy describes the bustling scene in the harbor and on the island – all of New York waiting, including two hundred women suffragists and the President of the United States. In detailed vignettes we see the construction of the statue in France, its voyage to America, and its installation in New York Harbor.

Through rhythmic, evocative prose and energetic pen-and-wash illustrations, we are made to feel the excitement of those gathered to see Liberty’s face for the first time, and to remember all that she represents.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"Pen-and-wash illustrations so lively they seem to dance on the page animart a story of the 1886 dedication of the Statue of Liberty . . . Drummond conveys the mounting excitement of the event itself while presenting a cavalcade of characters and incidents." —Starred, Publishers Weekly

"Scenes of the construction of France's gift to the U.S. are shown in finely wrought, energetic, pen-and-wash images that swirl through the text, offering something new and exciting at every turn of the page." - Starred, Booklist

"An excellent introduction to one of our national treasures and the spirit it embodies." - School Library Journal

Publishers Weekly
In a starred review, PW wrote, "Pen-and-wash illustrations so lively they seem to dance on the page animate a story of the 1886 dedication of the Statue of Liberty." Ages 4-8. (Mar.) Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.
Children's Literature
The fire of patriotism has burned particularly brightly since the tragedy of September 11. Drummond begins his inspirational tale with the unveiling of the Statue of Liberty in New York Harbor in 1886, told from the point of view of the boy who actually gave the signal to the sculptor Bartholdi. A brief description of the construction of the statue in France and America is followed by scenes of the crowds and the excitement of that moment of unveiling, and again of that at sunset when "Liberty's torch shone out bright from the land of the free to light up all the world." Our narrator concludes with his delight in the freedom we have, which "is like a flame we must all hold high and give to others and keep burning bright all around the world." Drummond's busy line and dashy watercolor washes are set on pages with lots of white space, blue sky and water. They bring a light-heartedness to the bits of text and speech balloons mingling with vignettes and larger pictures of the people and events. An introductory note adds factual background. 2002, Frances Foster Books/Farrar Straus and Giroux, $17.00. Ages 4 to 8. Reviewer: Ken Marantz and Sylvia Marantz
School Library Journal
K-Gr 3-On October 28, 1886, the sculptor Fr d ric Auguste Bartholdi unveiled his magnificent statue "Liberty Enlightening the World." Legend has it that a boy was supposed to signal Bartholdi, but for some unknown reason, the signal was lost and the rope was pulled prematurely. Drummond uses this snippet of history as the framework for his recounting of this exciting day. Through the eyes of this boy, readers see it all: the pouring rain; the boats full of suffragettes protesting a female Statue of Liberty when they themselves were not allowed to vote; the sea of red, white, and blue flags, both French and American. Drummond is meticulous regarding historical details, right down to the correct name (Magnolia) for the paddle-wheeling ferryboat that took the most esteemed visitors to the island. The bright and busy watercolor illustrations dance with energy and effectively capture both period and mood. At the end of the tale, the author becomes a bit preachy ("We are free-and we must help others to be free-") but this is a minor distraction in an otherwise nicely done book. Paired with Betsy and Giulio Maestro's The Story of the Statue of Liberty (Lothrop, 1986), Liberty! serves as an excellent introduction to one of our national treasures and the spirit it embodies.-Grace Oliff, Ann Blanche Smith School, Hillsdale, NJ Copyright 2002 Cahners Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
On the day of its unveiling, the flag covering the Statue of Liberty's face was mistakenly lowered too soon; Drummond imagines how it happened. The harbor was filled with boats-some of them bringing new immigrants to this country, and one containing women protesting the new statue. They found it odd that liberty should be portrayed as a woman when women were not allowed to vote in the US, and in fact only one woman and one small girl were allowed at the unveiling ceremony on the island. But the island was crowded with men-men who helped build the statue, put it together, and transport it from France. And in the crowd was a small boy enlisted by Mr. Bartholdi to signal him with his handkerchief. While everyone was waiting, the young French girl sneezed, and the young boy offered his handkerchief. And that is how the world came to see the Statue's face a little too early. Enhancing the story are Drummond's (Casey Jones, 2001, etc.) marvelous watercolors full of bright yellows, blues, and reds. The rainy gray day is reflected in the grayish-green water and the dark clothing and umbrellas of the crowds, while the excitement and importance of the event are seen in the brightly colored flags of France and the US. As the story mentions the men who put the statue together in America or made the statue in France, vignettes show the various stages and steps involved in its construction. In closing, Drummond reminds readers what freedom really means. An author's note introduces the story, separating the facts of the day from those details he imagined and giving more historical information about Lady Liberty. (Picture book. 4-10)

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780374443979
Publisher:
Farrar, Straus and Giroux
Publication date:
02/21/2006
Edition description:
First Edition
Pages:
40
Product dimensions:
9.84(w) x 9.66(h) x 0.11(d)
Age Range:
4 - 8 Years

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