Liberty

Liberty

4.0 2
by Lynn Curlee
     
 

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"Give me your tired, your poor, Your huddled masses yearning to breathe free..."
Follow the journey of the Statue of Liberty from 1865 to today as it goes from being a mere glimmer in the eyes of two Frenchmen to becoming a colossal gift to the United States, a gesture of friendship between the two nations, a monument to the first hundred years of American

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Overview

"Give me your tired, your poor, Your huddled masses yearning to breathe free..."
Follow the journey of the Statue of Liberty from 1865 to today as it goes from being a mere glimmer in the eyes of two Frenchmen to becoming a colossal gift to the United States, a gesture of friendship between the two nations, a monument to the first hundred years of American independence, and a symbol of liberty for all.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
In a starred review, PW called this "an exquisitely detailed behind-the-scenes look at the making of an American landmark. A reverent, absorbing homage to the world-renowned symbol of American freedom." Ages 7-12. (Jan.) Copyright 2002 Cahners Business Information.
Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
In a treatment every bit as thorough and even more impassioned than his Rushmore, art historian and artist Curlee gives readers an exquisitely detailed behind-the-scenes look at the making of another American landmark, a gift from the French. His tribute opens with the full text of Emma Lazarus's sonnet "The New Colossus," in which she refers to Lady Liberty as the "Mother of Exiles." Curlee follows with a finely honed description of the statue itself: "She is not pretty, but she is beautiful, her features majestic and severe, her glance stern and full of concentration." He demonstrates that the biography of the statue is inextricably linked to those of two Frenchmen, douard de Laboulaye and Fr d ric-Auguste Bartholdi, who first envisioned a monument to be built as a memorial to American independence; more than 20 years would pass before their vision would become a reality. Curlee includes fascinating details about the political wrangling, financial difficulties (an appeal directly to the American public by Joseph Pulitzer, via his newspaper, raised the final $100,000 for the statue's pedestal) and artistic labor; he is particular adept at explaining the engineering difficulties involved in putting together and supporting a statue that soars more than 150 feet tall and weighs more than 32 tons (Alexandre-Gustave Eiffel created its ingenious iron framework--nine years later, he would create his famous tower). Curlee's flat acrylics, which typically position the viewer looking up at the statue from below, work to create a majestic presence for "Liberty Enlightening the World." A reverent, absorbing homage to the world-renowned symbol of American freedom. Ages 7-12. (May) Copyright 2000 Cahners Business Information.|
Children's Literature - Children's Literature
Her face fills the cover and when you look closely, you see the faces of others peering through the windows in her crown. The Statue of Liberty is certainly one of the most famous statues in the world. She sits on a pedestal in New York Harbor and whether you are newly arrived or not, the sight of this great lady lifting her torch high is quite moving. Curlee has provided an informative and fascinating text that tells how the statue came to be. His style is so engaging that the people come alive and readers are swept up in the planning, fundraising, and magnitude of the construction, which all culminated twenty-one years later with the dedication on Bedloe's Island. Curlee's paintings, especially of the torch on display at the Philadelphia Exposition and of the head being moved to the Paris Universal Exposition, also tell the story of the massive size of the statue and how much effort was needed to raise the funds. Learning that Eiffel (of the famed Eiffel Tower) was the designer of the statue's interior framework, as well as many other facts about the construction and recent renovation, should keep kids turning the pages. It is a great story and a true one. Curlee's book should find a receptive home in school and home libraries. Also included are the statue's specifications, a timeline, bibliography and, on the opening pages, a reprint of Emma Lzarus' 1883 poem about the Statue of Liberty entitled "The New Colossus" which is carved in the pedestal. 2000, Atheneum, Ages 7 up, $18.00. Reviewer: Marilyn Courtot
Children's Literature
Clean prose and dramatic acrylic paintings tell the story of the Statue of Liberty, which was made to commemorate a century of American independence, and some of the changes Lady Liberty has undergone since her unveiling in 1886. A chart of specifications will have young readers quoting a forefinger eight feet long and a torch height twenty-one feet tall! Curlee indicates scale in a number of ways—by including people, other buildings, and the length of a bridge as indicators. It's also fascinating to realize that Eiffel built the interior structure and that Gutzon Borglum of Mt. Rushmore fame rebuilt the flame. The account of Joseph Pulitzer's offer to publish the name of anyone donating to the fund to build the base had me wondering if I could find any of my ancestors on that list. Details like the boatload of suffragettes protesting the fact that no women were invited to the grand opening connect this to the times beautifully. An emotional as well as informational approach to the topic. Endmatter includes a timeline, a tidy bibliography of both child and adult sources, and a specifications chart. 2000, Atheneum, $18.00. Ages 8 to 12. Reviewer: Susan Hepler
School Library Journal
Gr 3-8-As he did in Rushmore (Scholastic, 1999), Curlee again focuses his attention on one of the nation's better-known national monuments-in this case, the Statue of Liberty. This slim volume, done in a large picture-book format, presents a history of the origin, construction, and eventual restoration of "the most colossal metal statue ever made." The author often refers to Lady Liberty as a living, breathing being. For example, on page one he writes, "She is not pretty, but she is beautiful, her features majestic and severe, her glance stern and full of concentration," and later, "But, like freedom itself, she cannot be taken for granted; the great lady must be loved and cared for." Overall, the text is readable and most engaging when surveying the technical difficulties and craftsmanship involved in the making of such a huge sculpture. Particularly noteworthy are Curlee's richly hued, stylized acrylic paintings, which are both compellingly dramatic and strikingly static. A list of "Specifications" such as height, weight, and cost; a "Timeline" documenting important events from 1865 to 1986; and a brief bibliography are appended. Similar in format to Betsy Maestro's The Story of the Statue of Liberty (Lothrop, 1986), but more suited to older readers, this title is one that most libraries will want to own.-Alicia Eames, New York City Public Schools Copyright 2000 Cahners Business Information.|
Kirkus Reviews
This is a comprehensive, fact-filled, and stunningly illustrated history of the Statue of Liberty. It begins with an explanation of why the French came up with the idea in the first place, and how the brilliant young sculptor Frederic-Auguste Bartholdi became interested in the project that was to be his obsession for the next 15 years. Bartholdi decided where the statue must stand as soon as he laid eyes on what is now Liberty Island. "Here . . . my statue must rise; here where people get their first view of the New World." A brief description of neoclassicism is followed by the history of the statue's construction and the engineering feats it required. The statue was constructed in separate stages and, after the head was built, it was exhibited in the Paris Universal Exposition of 1878. The head was pulled through the streets of Paris in a cart pulled by 13 horses (the double-page spread of Liberty's head crossing a bridge in Paris is alone worth the price of the book). There are hardly any women mentioned or pictured in the book, and Curlee addresses this by pointing out the irony that the statue exemplifying the spirit of liberty was erected at a time when women didn't even have the right to vote. Acrylic paintings reproduced in full color from photographic transparencies are the artistic medium, and the appealing, interesting palette of blues, blacks, and bronzes captures the ambition and majesty of the project. While the text is occasionally pompous, and perhaps not as much fun as the Betsy and Guilio Maestro book on the same subject, Liberty is an engaging and useful resource for the classroom and library. (specifications, timeline, bibliography)(Picturebook/nonfiction. 8-12)

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780689856839
Publisher:
Atheneum Books for Young Readers
Publication date:
01/01/2003
Edition description:
Reprint
Pages:
48
Sales rank:
1,495,466
Product dimensions:
9.00(w) x 12.00(h) x 0.10(d)
Age Range:
7 - 12 Years

Meet the Author

Lynn Curlee, who received a Robert F. Sibert Informational Honor Book Award for Brooklyn Bridge, comes from a family of intense sports fans. His other books include Liberty, Ships of the Air, Into the Ice: The Story of Arctic Exploration, Rushmore, The Seven Wonders of the Ancient World, Capital, and, most recently, Parthenon. He lives on the North Fork of Long Island, New York.

Lynn Curlee, who received a Robert F. Sibert Informational Honor Book Award for Brooklyn Bridge, comes from a family of intense sports fans. His other books include Liberty, Ships of the Air, Into the Ice: The Story of Arctic Exploration, Rushmore, The Seven Wonders of the Ancient World, Capital, and, most recently, Parthenon. He lives on the North Fork of Long Island, New York.

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