Liberty, Property, and Markets: A Critique of Libertarianism

Liberty, Property, and Markets: A Critique of Libertarianism

by Daniel Attas
     
 

The libertarianism critiqued in this work is a right-based political morality that "proceeds from a set of moral rights grounded on liberty to the justification of the non-interventive state and the market, and the rejection of redistributive taxation," in the words of Attas (Hebrew U. of Jerusalem, Israel), and is best exemplified by Robert Nozick's work in Anarchy,… See more details below

Overview

The libertarianism critiqued in this work is a right-based political morality that "proceeds from a set of moral rights grounded on liberty to the justification of the non-interventive state and the market, and the rejection of redistributive taxation," in the words of Attas (Hebrew U. of Jerusalem, Israel), and is best exemplified by Robert Nozick's work in Anarchy, State, and Utopia (1974). Attas bases his critique in undermining three core principles of libertarianism: the principle of self-ownership, which asserts that each person is the morally rightful owner of his body and mental and physical capacities; the principle of just appropriation, which suggests that individuals rightly come to own previously unowned natural resources; and the principle of preservation of ownership, which argues that ownership is not forfeited when the thing owned is transformed by the owner. Annotation ©2006 Book News, Inc., Portland, OR

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780754652588
Publisher:
Ashgate Publishing, Limited
Publication date:
09/30/2005
Series:
Ashgate New Critical Thinking in Philosophy Series
Pages:
184
Product dimensions:
6.20(w) x 9.30(h) x 0.60(d)

Table of Contents

Introduction : libertarianism : an outline1
1Libertarian property11
2Persons49
3Natural resources81
4Products121
5Conclusion : libertarianism : a verdict155

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