Liberty's Journey

Liberty's Journey

by Kelly Dipucchio, Richard Egielski
     
 
Lady Liberty has welcomed immigrants to New York for more than one hundred years-but she's never traveled beyond her island. She's curious to see the country that has become home to the millions who have passed beneath her torch. She wants to go on an old-fashioned road trip! So one foggy morning, the giant Lady tiptoes off her pedestal and begins her journey. Down

Overview

Lady Liberty has welcomed immigrants to New York for more than one hundred years-but she's never traveled beyond her island. She's curious to see the country that has become home to the millions who have passed beneath her torch. She wants to go on an old-fashioned road trip! So one foggy morning, the giant Lady tiptoes off her pedestal and begins her journey. Down alleyways, along railroad tracks, through cities and small towns, across deserts, and over mountains, she greets surprised and delighted Americans. The country is as captivating, as Lady Liberty knew it would be, but New Yorkers miss her terribly. How can they persuade her to come home, where she belongs?

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature
The Statue of Liberty is certainly one of the symbols most frequently associated with America. It was the sight of this large statute that greeting millions of immigrants to the United States; the torch symbolized the light of hope for a better life. In this almost surreal story told in poetic verse—Lady Liberty decides to take a look at the country to better understand "the people who had come and gone." Artist Egielski has given the statue facial expressions that match the emotions she is feeling as she begins her tour across the land. In a mix of words from "America the Beautiful," Lady Liberty searches for "amber waves of grain," she hears from the grandchildren of immigrants who passed by her many years ago as she continues "`cross the fruited plain" and completes her journey from "sea to shining sea." Her absence is of course noticed and the people of New York write letters urging her to return to her home, which of course she does. It is an unusual mix of reality and fantasy and may not be appreciated as much by children as adults who have the context to understand the play off the song and poem "America the Beautiful" and know the history of the Statue of Liberty. The authors note tells about the statue's history and also reprints the poem at the base—"The New Colossus." 2004, Hyperion, Ages 4 to 7.
—Marilyn Courtot
School Library Journal
K-Gr 3-Lady Liberty takes a stroll across America in search of the immigrants who passed by her on their way to other parts of the country. She ends up in San Francisco, but she is lonely for Manhattan: "She missed her home, where hope was born." New Yorkers, in turn, send a sack full of mail imploring the Lady to come back. Overjoyed, she arrives home to a ticker-tape welcome. This disappointing story in verse takes its stiff heroine through farmlands, desert, and cattle country-"her joy renewed by distant places/filled with children's hopeful faces." While Egielski's warm and vibrant illustrations depict Lady Liberty as an involved and humanlike participant in the lives of the people she meets, the text fails to establish her as anything more than an enormous silent statue who is out of place. She never reacts to the people she meets on her journey, and merely stares with a kind look upon seeing old and new immigrants. The whole plot just doesn't make much sense.-Jane Barrer, Washington Square Village Creative Steps, New York City Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
Lady Liberty steps out for a cross-country adventure in this intriguing story illustrated with striking paintings by Caldecott Medalist Egielski. He captures the calm beauty of the statue, expanding the given parameters to create an inquisitive but shy personality for the colossal, copper-clad character. She walks westward, seeing the sights, until she reaches the Pacific Ocean, when she realizes she misses her home in New York. She returns to her special place, shown in a sweeping spread of Lady Liberty against the nighttime city skyline. The rhyming text describing the statue's journey employs some evocative language, but also has some verses with a sing-song quality and a few lines that don't quite scan. Elementary-school teachers will find lots of uses for this in their classrooms, as the story is applicable to lessons in history, geography, math, and creative writing. An author's note provides additional information about the Statue of Liberty as well as the words to the poem inscribed on its base. (Picture book. 4-8)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780786818761
Publisher:
Disney-Hyperion
Publication date:
09/01/2004
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
8.25(w) x 11.75(h) x 0.37(d)
Lexile:
AD850L (what's this?)
Age Range:
4 - 7 Years

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