The Librarian's Guide to Graphic Novels for Children and Tweens

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Editorial Reviews

VOYA - Kristin Fletcher-Spear
As only the second book published for librarians on graphic novels for children, this title is enticing to consider for purchase. Serchay, a longtime graphic-novel advocate, has a thorough guide on the whys and hows of building a graphic novel collection. The first half of the book covers the basics: understanding graphic novels and building and managing a collection. He provides a solid discussion on these topics, but unfortunately many other books have already covered this information. Many of his examples use titles that are not appropriate for a youth department collection, making it feel as if the author altered his focus but did not change his examples. Although Serchay does not recommend these titles for children and tweens, the fact that he includes them might cause the reader to think that they are acceptable. The last half of the book contains appendixes of suggested graphic novels, further reading, and online resources. The graphic novel booklist is a representation of the genres and titles available and not necessarily a "best of" list, although the author marks titles he recommends. The titles are coded for younger elementary, older elementary, and early teen. Although there is no evaluative content, the wide variety of titles-both fiction and nonfiction-is this list's strength. Even with the above-mentioned issues, it is a solid resource for youth librarians who have not yet delved into building a graphic novel collection. Reviewer: Kristin Fletcher-Spear
Children's Literature - Michael Jung
Confused about all the graphic novels out there? Wondering which ones are appropriate for young audiences? Asking yourself why graphic novels should be included in your library at all? Youth services librarian and comic book fan David S. Serchay answers all these questions and more in 10 easy-to-follow, yet content-rich chapters. Tracing the history of comic books back to cave paintings and hieroglyphics, Serchay takes readers on a ride that explores how comic books are made, the diverse genres covered by graphic novels and the enormous appeal of Asian manga and other graphic novels from different countries. Newcomers to the world of comic books will be amazed to learn how effective graphic novels can be in teaching English, developing visual literacy and helping reluctant and enthusiastic readers improve their vocabulary. Those wondering which graphic novels to select for their libraries will be happy to know that the book provides three appendixes with lists of recommended graphic novels, further reading and online resources. Practical issues, including the best way to purchase, preserve, and promote graphic novels for libraries, are also covered. And while graphic novels currently enjoy greater respect from librarians, Serchay is aware that prejudices still exist, and devotes an entire chapter to strategies for dealing with potential problems. Given the many misconceptions surrounding graphic novels today, Serchay's book is an essential primer for any parents, teachers or librarians who would like to expand their own horizons and those of their children, students and patrons. Reviewer: Michael Jung
Library Journal

In this most up-to-date of a dozen guides for librarians, Serchay goes far beyond recommending titles for readers up to age 12. Including a wealth of practical advice, Part 1 provides historical and genre background, Part 2 covers the whys and hows of building the collection, and Part 3 reviews ways to manage, promote, and maintain the collection. This is "Graphic Novels 101" for newbies but longer and more comprehensive than prior books, including such details as racial diversity in comics and what GN-related services are offered by specific library vendors and likely to offer new information to many GN veterans. One appendix annotates around 230 recommended titles and series, while additional appendixes list book and online resources. By comparison, Michele Gorman's Getting Graphic! Comics for Kids (LJ 3/15/08) focuses only on recommended titles and series, about half as many. However, Gorman's book is valuable for its longer annotations and lower price. Michael Pawuk's massive Graphic Novels: A Genre Guide (LJ 7/08) includes titles for younger readers but has no age index and is designed solely as a catalog of suggested works. Serchay's book is highly and enthusiastically recommended for libraries serving children and tweens. Look for his matching guide to graphic novels for adults, coming next year.-M.C.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781555706265
  • Publisher: Neal Schuman Pub
  • Publication date: 5/28/2008
  • Pages: 272
  • Product dimensions: 6.00 (w) x 8.90 (h) x 0.70 (d)

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