Library Instruction Revisited

Library Instruction Revisited

by Linda S Katz, Lynne M. Martin
     
 

Library Instruction Revisited explores the progress, status, and challenge of bibliographic instruction over the past decade and speculates about its future. A central aspect of the changing nature of librarianship has been a shift in the reference staff's self-definition. Reference librarians who once sat in a specific location awaiting students and faculty who…  See more details below

Overview

Library Instruction Revisited explores the progress, status, and challenge of bibliographic instruction over the past decade and speculates about its future. A central aspect of the changing nature of librarianship has been a shift in the reference staff's self-definition. Reference librarians who once sat in a specific location awaiting students and faculty who needed help now have increasingly proactive functions teaching users systematic approaches to research using discipline-specific and general library research methods. As librarianship has transformed with an increasingly technology-dependent world, bibliographic instruction has evolved, “come of age,” and proven itself a necessary addition to library services.

Editor Lynne M. Martin begins with an introduction and, for comparison, she includes two previously published chapters on bibliographic instruction. Readers will see noteworthy advancement over the past decade, as these chapters document bibliographic instruction's progress and challenge its adversaries.

This volume covers significant and timely bibliographic instruction issues including:

  • Collaboration—Covers the need for collaboration between reference librarians and their teaching colleagues, as well as technical services librarians and paraprofessional colleagues.
  • Technology—Explores the impact of technology, including CD-ROMS, OPACs, interactive media, networks, and the Internet as we enter the age of “virtual library.”
  • Cultural diversity—Recognizes the need for bibliographic instruction specifically targeting nontraditional and culturally diverse students.
  • Pedagogy—Reveals the necessary incorporation of pedagogical elements, such as critical thinking and active learning, to bibliographic instruction.

    Library Instruction Revisited attests to the importance of bibliographic instruction and addresses the evaluation and validity of its programs. It offers new perspectives on bibliographic instruction's changing and imperative role in maintaining efficient and effective library services. It is an invaluable guide for reference librarians in academic, public, and school library settings seeking the most current information about bibliographic instruction.

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Editorial Reviews

Library Journal
This anthology is the third volume of "The Reference Librarian" to focus on library instruction. Its six general themes are the history of bibliographic instruction (BI); the incorporation of learning theories into BI; cooperative efforts in meeting various BI needs; the impact of information technology on BI; multiculturalism; and case studies of solutions to specific BI challenges. Within this framework, various contributors discuss distance education, evaluation, techniques, creative staffing for BI, international students, and BI in a "virtual" environment. The index, bibliographies, and sample forms add to the book's value as a resource for modifying existing instructional efforts and/or introducing neophytes to core issues in this area of librarianship. Editors of the 1984 (Library Instruction and Reference Services, edited by Bill Katz and Ruth Fraley) and 1989 (Integrating Library Use Skills into the General Education Curriculum, edited by Maureen Pastine and Bill Katz) BI volumes of "The Reference Librarian" were solicited to provide introductions to the 1995 anthology. Their perspective helps readers trace the development of BI service and appreciate the enormous challenges practitioners face. Recommended for librarians and students.-Betty J. Glass, Univ. of Nevada Lib., Reno
Booknews
Thirty-seven contributions covers a broad range of bibliographic instruction-related issues including its history, learning theories and pedagogy, evaluation, collaborative learning, cooperation, technology, the future, and change. Includes numerous case studies, and many bibliographies are annotated. Current topics are also explored, including diversity and the Internet. Previously published as The Reference Librarian, numbers 51/52, 1995. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781560247593
Publisher:
Taylor & Francis
Publication date:
01/28/1995
Series:
Reference Librarian Series
Pages:
482
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 8.60(h) x 1.50(d)

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