Life And Letters Of John Greenleaf Whittier

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CHAPTER III. EDITOKIAL EXPERIENCE AND LITERARY VENTURES. 1828-1832. Mr. Whittier decided to enter the printing-office of the Colliers, and in December, 1828, we find him in Boston, a member of the household of Rev. Mr. Collier, a ...
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Life and letters of John Greenleaf Whittier

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Overview

Purchase of this book includes free trial access to www.million-books.com where you can read more than a million books for free.
This is an OCR edition with typos.
Excerpt from book:
CHAPTER III. EDITOKIAL EXPERIENCE AND LITERARY VENTURES. 1828-1832. Mr. Whittier decided to enter the printing-office of the Colliers, and in December, 1828, we find him in Boston, a member of the household of Rev. Mr. Collier, a Baptist clergyman, the senior partner of the publishing firm. The Colliers, father and son, published two weekly papers and a monthly magazine. One of the weeklies was the " American Manufacturer," a political journal, friendly to Henry Clay. The monthly was the " Baptist Preacher." The partisan politics of the " Manufacturer " suited Mr. Whittier as well as did the cause represented by the "Philanthropist," and it was the Henry Clay paper that bore his name at the head of its editorial columns, on the 1st of January, 1829. The new editor began a spirited discussion of the tariff question, favoring duties to protect American industries, and also wrote sketches and poems for each number of his paper. It was a temperance poem with which he led off, entitled " Take Back the Bowl." This is the first stanza: — " Take back the bowl I I will not seal The hallowed memories of the past; They add no pangs to those I feel, Nor shadows on the future cast. Aye, take it back! let others bring Oblivion o'er the hannted soul; My memory is a blessed thing — Away ! away ! take back the bowl." Nearly every number of the " Manufacturer" contained a poem by its editor, but scarcely any of them were considered by him worth preserving, even when he made his first collection of poems; and yet they were widely copied and gave him a constantly increasing reputation as a poet. In April, 1829, he began a series of satirical political poems, under the title of " Tariffiana." It was soon after this he wrote the poetical tribute to Henry Clay, which was recite...
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781154368109
  • Publisher: General Books LLC
  • Publication date: 1/6/2012
  • Pages: 210
  • Product dimensions: 7.44 (w) x 9.69 (h) x 0.44 (d)

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CHAPTER III. EDITOKIAL EXPERIENCE AND LITERARY VENTURES. 1828-1832. Mr. Whittier decided to enter the printing-office of the Colliers, and in December, 1828, we find him in Boston, a member of the household of Rev. Mr. Collier, a Baptist clergyman, the senior partner of the publishing firm. The Colliers, father and son, published two weekly papers and a monthly magazine. One of the weeklies was the " American Manufacturer," a political journal, friendly to Henry Clay. The monthly was the " Baptist Preacher." The partisan politics of the " Manufacturer " suited Mr. Whittier as well as did the cause represented by the "Philanthropist," and it was the Henry Clay paper that bore his name at the head of its editorial columns, on the 1st of January, 1829. The new editor began a spirited discussion of the tariff question, favoring duties to protect American industries, and also wrote sketches and poems for each number of his paper. It was a temperance poem with which he led off, entitled " Take Back the Bowl." This is the first stanza: " Take back the bowl I I will not seal The hallowed memories of the past; They add no pangs to those I feel, Nor shadows on the future cast. Aye, take it back! let others bring Oblivion o'er the hannted soul; My memory is a blessed thing Away ! away ! take back the bowl." Nearly every number of the " Manufacturer" contained a poem by its editor, but scarcely any of them were considered by him worth preserving, even when he made his first collection of poems; and yet they were widely copied and gave him a constantly increasing reputation as a poet. In April, 1829, he began a series of satirical political poems, under the title of " Tariffiana." It wassoon after this he wrote the poetical tribute to Henry Clay, which was recite...
Read More Show Less

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