The Life And Letters Of Nathan Smith, M.B., M.D.

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CHAPTER FOURTH The Founding Of The Dartmouth Medical School. Dr. Smith's Voyage To Edinburgh, Where He Continues His Medical Studies Strong in the determination to provide opportunities for this needed instruction, Dr. Smith ...
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Overview

Purchase of this book includes free trial access to www.million-books.com where you can read more than a million books for free.
This is an OCR edition with typos.
Excerpt from book:
CHAPTER FOURTH The Founding Of The Dartmouth Medical School. Dr. Smith's Voyage To Edinburgh, Where He Continues His Medical Studies Strong in the determination to provide opportunities for this needed instruction, Dr. Smith applied to the trustees of Dartmouth College, at their annual meeting in August, 1796, for their approbation of a plan he had devised for establishing a Professorship of the Theory and Practice of Medicine in connection with Dartmouth. His plan was fully approved by President John Wheelock; the scheme, novel and far-reaching, was favorably received and discussed by the trustees, a resolution complimentary to the character and energy of Dr. Smith passed, and hope given for future encouragement; but it was voted to postpone final action upon the proposition for a year. This unsatisfactory response to his generous offer might have entirely discouraged an ordinary man, but Dr. Smith was only stimulated to new effort and determined to persevere in what he hoped might benefit many sufferers, for the only three schools then in the United States where medicine was taught were those of the University of Pennsylvania, the Medical School of Columbia College and the Medical School of Harvard College. In the absence of railroads, the distances to be traveled made it almost impossible for young men of moderate means to attend these schools, and one desiring to study medicine was compelled to apprentice himself to a physician who would instruct him in return for some menial work asoffice helper or farm hand. In consequence of the lack of proper instruction, few physicians of that day were at all qualified to attend the sick. Dr. Smith, with his usual energy and far-sightedness, decided to utilize the months of waiting for the trustees of Dartmouth to ac...
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781103027842
  • Publisher: BiblioBazaar
  • Publication date: 1/28/2009
  • Pages: 264
  • Product dimensions: 5.00 (w) x 8.00 (h) x 0.55 (d)

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CHAPTER FOURTH The Founding Of The Dartmouth Medical School. Dr. Smith's Voyage To Edinburgh, Where He Continues His Medical Studies Strong in the determination to provide opportunities for this needed instruction, Dr. Smith applied to the trustees of Dartmouth College, at their annual meeting in August, 1796, for their approbation of a plan he had devised for establishing a Professorship of the Theory and Practice of Medicine in connection with Dartmouth. His plan was fully approved by President John Wheelock; the scheme, novel and far-reaching, was favorably received and discussed by the trustees, a resolution complimentary to the character and energy of Dr. Smith passed, and hope given for future encouragement; but it was voted to postpone final action upon the proposition for a year. This unsatisfactory response to his generous offer might have entirely discouraged an ordinary man, but Dr. Smith was only stimulated to new effort and determined to persevere in what he hoped might benefit many sufferers, for the only three schools then in the United States where medicine was taught were those of the University of Pennsylvania, the Medical School of Columbia College and the Medical School of Harvard College. In the absence of railroads, the distances to be traveled made it almost impossible for young men of moderate means to attend these schools, and one desiring to study medicine was compelled to apprentice himself to a physician who would instruct him in return for some menial work as office helper or farm hand. In consequence of the lack of proper instruction, few physicians of that day were at all qualified to attend the sick. Dr. Smith, with his usual energy andfar-sightedness, decided to utilize the months of waiting for the trustees of Dartmouth to ac...
Read More Show Less

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