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Life and Public Services of William Pitt Fessenden
     

Life and Public Services of William Pitt Fessenden

by Francis Fessenden
 

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Life and Public Services of William Pitt Fessenden by Francis Fessenden.
This book is a reproduction of the original book published in 1907 and may have some imperfections such as marks or hand-written notes.

Overview

Life and Public Services of William Pitt Fessenden by Francis Fessenden.
This book is a reproduction of the original book published in 1907 and may have some imperfections such as marks or hand-written notes.

Product Details

BN ID:
2940027149253
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
File size:
713 KB

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CHAPTER VIII RADICAL AND CONSERVATIVE SENATORS 1866-1868 The preceding chapter has been confined to Senator Fessenden's part in solving the question of reconstruction, but during the same period many duties of a miscellaneous nature were cast upon him. This year (1866) witnessed changes in the Senate which deeply affected Mr. Fessenden. He lost by death two of his firmest and most intimate friends, Senators Collamer and Foot of Vermont. Both were members of the Senate throughout the anti- slavery contests before the civil war and during the weary years of the Rebellion. Mr. Fessenden pronounced one of the obituary addresses upon Mr. Collamer. After speaking of his peculiarities of intellect and character, he said that " no one could better than himself bear testimony to his kindness of heart, his readiness to impart imformation, and give the advantage of his learning and wisdom to those about him whenever sought or needed. Seated by his side, session after session, for many years, he habitually asked his advice, and sought his aid, whenever embarrassed by doubt or difficulty. He venerated and loved the man as one regarded an older brother upon whose superior knowledge and wisdom and unselfish singleness of heart he feels that in all emergencies he may safely rely." Mr. Foot was born in the same year as Mr. Fessenden. Their friendship had been, from the beginning, of the closest nature. Mr. Foot had returned to the Senate inDecember in apparent health, to be suddenly struck down with a fatal disease. His death was almost dramatic, as he was in full possession of his faculties, conscious that he must die, and in this condition he took leave of his friends. The scene at his deathbedhas been described by the clergyman in attendance. " When Mr. Fessenden approached him, he e...

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