Life Exposed: Biological Citizens after Chernobyl (New in Paper)

Overview

On April 26, 1986, Unit Four of the Chernobyl nuclear reactor exploded in then Soviet Ukraine. More than 3.5 million people in Ukraine alone, not to mention many citizens of surrounding countries, are still suffering the effects. Life Exposed is the first book to comprehensively examine the vexed political, scientific, and social circumstances that followed the disaster. Tracing the story from an initial lack of disclosure to post-Soviet democratizing attempts to compensate sufferers, Adriana Petryna uses ...

See more details below
Paperback (Reissue)
$15.97
BN.com price
(Save 30%)$22.95 List Price
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (9) from $15.86   
  • New (6) from $15.86   
  • Used (3) from $18.20   
Life Exposed: Biological Citizens after Chernobyl

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 7.0
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 10.1
  • NOOK HD Tablet
  • NOOK HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK eReaders
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook - With a New introduction by the author)
$16.06
BN.com price
(Save 30%)$22.95 List Price

Overview

On April 26, 1986, Unit Four of the Chernobyl nuclear reactor exploded in then Soviet Ukraine. More than 3.5 million people in Ukraine alone, not to mention many citizens of surrounding countries, are still suffering the effects. Life Exposed is the first book to comprehensively examine the vexed political, scientific, and social circumstances that followed the disaster. Tracing the story from an initial lack of disclosure to post-Soviet democratizing attempts to compensate sufferers, Adriana Petryna uses anthropological tools to take us into a world whose social realities are far more immediate and stark than those described by policymakers and scientists. She asks: What happens to politics when state officials fail to inform their fellow citizens of real threats to life? What are the moral and political consequences of remedies available in the wake of technological disasters?

Through extensive research in state institutions, clinics, laboratories, and with affected families and workers of the so-called Zone, Petryna illustrates how the event and its aftermath have not only shaped the course of an independent nation but have made health a negotiated realm of entitlement. She tracks the emergence of a "biological citizenship" in which assaults on health become the coinage through which sufferers stake claims for biomedical resources, social equity, and human rights. Life Exposed provides an anthropological framework for understanding the politics of emergent democracies, the nature of citizenship claims, and everyday forms of survival as they are interwoven with the profound changes that accompanied the collapse of the Soviet Union.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Medical Humanities Review
Petryna's ethnographic approach consciously shapes her account and illuminates it with detail that historians of the future will treasure.
— Jeanne Guillemin
Medical Humanities Review - Jeanne Guillemin
Petryna's ethnographic approach consciously shapes her account and illuminates it with detail that historians of the future will treasure.
Journal of the American Medical Association - LARissa Remennick
The book presents exceptionally rich anthropological material generated through observations and interviews. . . . The true scope of the human tragedy caused by this man-made catastrophe comes to the fore via biological stories of Petryna's informants.
Journal of the Royal Anthropological Institute - Jonathan P. Parry
[Chernobyl] is a dramatic and important story, and Life Exposed is a compelling book. . . . [A]n important study that will interest a wide anthropological audience.
Journal of the American Medical Association - Larissa Remennick
The book presents exceptionally rich anthropological material generated through observations and interviews. . . . The true scope of the human tragedy caused by this man-made catastrophe comes to the fore via biological stories of Petryna's informants.
author of "World at Risk ich Beck

There is nothing comparable. Very well written, it will be of major interest to readers in risk analysis and risk sociology, science studies, and political science, as well as to anyone interested in the consequences of megatechnologies.
From the Publisher
Winner of the 2006 New Millennium Award, Society of Medical Anthropology

Co-Winner of the 2003 Sharon Stephens First Book Prize, American Ethnological Society

"Petryna's ethnographic approach consciously shapes her account and illuminates it with detail that historians of the future will treasure."—Jeanne Guillemin, Medical Humanities Review

"The book presents exceptionally rich anthropological material generated through observations and interviews. . . . The true scope of the human tragedy caused by this man-made catastrophe comes to the fore via biological stories of Petryna's informants."—Larissa Remennick, Journal of the American Medical Association

"There is nothing comparable. Very well written, it will be of major interest to readers in risk analysis and risk sociology, science studies, and political science, as well as to anyone interested in the consequences of megatechnologies."—Ulrich Beck, author of World at Risk

"[Chernobyl] is a dramatic and important story, and Life Exposed is a compelling book. . . . [A]n important study that will interest a wide anthropological audience."—Jonathan P. Parry, Journal of the Royal Anthropological Institute

Journal of the American Medical Association
The book presents exceptionally rich anthropological material generated through observations and interviews. . . . The true scope of the human tragedy caused by this man-made catastrophe comes to the fore via biological stories of Petryna's informants.
— Larissa Remennick
Journal of the Royal Anthropological Institute
[Chernobyl] is a dramatic and important story, and Life Exposed is a compelling book. . . . [A]n important study that will interest a wide anthropological audience.
— Jonathan P. Parry
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780691151663
  • Publisher: Princeton University Press
  • Publication date: 2/24/2013
  • Series: In-Formation
  • Edition description: Reissue
  • Pages: 312
  • Sales rank: 835,562
  • Product dimensions: 6.00 (w) x 9.10 (h) x 0.90 (d)

Meet the Author

Adriana Petryna is the Edmund J. and Louise W. Kahn Term Professor in Anthropology at the University of Pennsylvania. She is the author of "When Experiments Travel: Clinical Trials and the Global Search for Human Subjects" and the coeditor of "When People Come First: Critical Studies in Global Health" (both Princeton).

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

List of Figures and Tables xi
Introduction to the 2013 Edition xiii
Acknowledgments xxxiii
Note on Transliteration xxxvii

Chapter 1 Life Politics after Chernobyl 1

  • Time Lapse 1
  • A Technogenic Catastrophe 9
  • Nation Building 20
  • Experimental Systems 25
  • Docta Ignorantia 27
  • The Unstoppable Course of Radiation Illness 32

Chapter 2 Technical Error: Measures of Life and Risk 34

  • A Foreign Burden 34
  • Saturated Grid 36
  • Institute of Biophysics, Moscow 39
  • Soviet-American Cooperation 41
  • Safe Living Politics 49
  • Life Sciences 55
  • Risk In Vivo 59

Chapter 3 Chernobyl in Historical Light 63

  • How to Remember Then 64
  • New City of Bila-Skala 66
  • Vitalii 67
  • Contracts of Truth 69
  • Oksana 70
  • Anna 72
  • Requiem for Storytelling 76

Chapter 4 Illness as Work: Human Market Transition 82

  • City of Sufferers 82
  • Capitalist Transition 92
  • Nothing to Buy and Nothing to Sell 94
  • Medical-Labor Committees 102
  • Disability Claims 107
  • Illness for Life 113

Chapter 5 Biological Citizenship 115

  • Remediation Models 115
  • Normalizing Catastrophe 119
  • Suffering and Medical Signs 121
  • Domestic Neurology 126
  • Disability Groups 130
  • Law, Medicine, and Corruption 138
  • Material Basis of Health 143

Chapter 6 Local Science and Organic Processes 149

  • Social Rebuilding 149
  • Radiation Research 151
  • Between the Lesional and the Psychosocial 156
  • New Sociality 165
  • Doctor-Patient Relations 174
  • No One Is Hiding Anything Anymore 176
  • In the Middle of the Experiment 181

Chapter 7 Self and Social Identity in Transition 191

  • Anton and Halia 191
  • Beyond the Family: Kvartyra and Public Voice 194
  • Medicalized Selves 201
  • Everyday Violence 206
  • Lifetime 212

Chapter 8 Conclusion 215
Notes 221
Bibliography 239
Index 253

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)