Life in Ancient Rome

( 4 )

Overview

In this well-written and well-researched social history F.R. Cowell succeeds in making Life in Ancient Rome alive and dynamic. The combination of acute historical detail and supplementary illustrations makes this book perfectly suited for the student preparing to explore the classics, as well as the tourist preparing to explore twentieth-century Rome. Lucid and engaging, Life In Ancient Rome is for anyone seeking familiarity with the greatness that was Rome.
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Overview

In this well-written and well-researched social history F.R. Cowell succeeds in making Life in Ancient Rome alive and dynamic. The combination of acute historical detail and supplementary illustrations makes this book perfectly suited for the student preparing to explore the classics, as well as the tourist preparing to explore twentieth-century Rome. Lucid and engaging, Life In Ancient Rome is for anyone seeking familiarity with the greatness that was Rome.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780399503283
  • Publisher: Penguin Group (USA) Incorporated
  • Publication date: 2/28/1976
  • Series: Perigee Series
  • Pages: 224
  • Sales rank: 765,288
  • Product dimensions: 5.38 (w) x 7.68 (h) x 0.60 (d)

Table of Contents

Preface Acknowledgment Map of Rome

I THE CITY OF ROME
The Rise and Growth of the City Apartments and Houses Furniture Gardens

II GROWING UP IN ANCIENT ROME
Home Education School and Schoolmasters School Education Telling the Time The Calendar Money Weights and Measures Higher Studies

III FAMILY LIFE
The Spirit of Home Life Women at Home Encouraging Large Families Beauty Treatment Barbers Clothes Meals, Food and Drink Kitchens and Cooking Making Bread Wine Health and Hygiene Death and Burial

IV SLAVERY
Origins and Development of Slavery Cost of Slaves Slave Labour Treatment of Slaves Slave Revolts Freedmen and Freedwomen

V EARNING A LIVING
Traditional Attitudes to Industry and Trade Rome's Imports and Their Transport Building Clothing, Milling and Baking Market-Gardening in and around Rome Shops and Markets Professional Life
Lawyers Doctors Surgeons Writers
Free Food Inns, Taverns and Snack Bars Roman Roads Class Distinctions

VI LEISURE HOURS
Work and Leisure Hours The Lure of Rome The Baths High Society The Elegant Younger Set Dances Cultural Interests
Music Oratory Books and Reading
Shows and Spectacles
The Stage Chariot Races A Day at the Amphitheatre
Roman Dynamism

VII RELIGION
Traditional Beliefs State Religion Festivals and Games Astrology Mystery Cults
Isis and Osiris Mithraism
The Rise of Christianity

Chronological Summary A Note about Books Index

LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS
1 A sacrifice in front of the Temple of Juno Moneta
2 Part of Constantine's triumphal procession passing through the Forum Romanum
3 Part of Constantine's triumphal procession passing the Tabularium and ascending the steps of the Temple of Jupiter Capitolinus
4 The atrium, or central courtyard, of a Roman house
5 Hypocaust system of central heating
6 Chair
7 Couch
8 Roman lighting
9 Braziers
10 Earthenware cups and dishes
11 Jewellery
12 A peristyle
13 Lararium, or shrine of the Lar familiaris
14 Schoolmaster flogging a pupil
15 A banker
16 A schoolroom scene
17 Interior of a shop selling belts and pillows
18-22 Some coins of the early Empire
23 Wedding ceremony
24 A baker and his wife
25 A well-to-do lady being dressed by her slave girls
26 Beauty aids
27 Bronze hand-mirror
28 Beards of the Second Century A.D. and the late Republic
29 Fullers at work
30 Full Roman dress
31 Military dress
32 Glassware
33 A Roman kitchen
34 Kitchen utensils
35 Bronze urn
36 Earthenware jars for storing wine and oil
37 Small wine-table
38 Part of a funeral procession
39 Tombs of eminent citizens
40 Columbaria
41 Sale of a foreign slave
42 A rich lady being carried in a litter
43 An aqueduct
44 Slave driving his master's coach
45 Manumission, or ceremonial freeing of a slave
46 Carrier's wagon leaving a wine-merchant's shop
47 A barge, laden with wine, being towed up the Tiber, from Ostia to Rome
48 Loading a barge at Ostia
49 Ass and slaves at work in a flour mill
50 A pharmacy
51 A retail merchant's shop
52 The Forum Trajani, the market built by the Emperor Trajan in A.D. 114
53 A steelyard
54 A cobbler
55 A baker's shop
56 The interior of the Temple of Jupiter Capitolinus
57 A selection of surgical instruments
58 Grain measures
59 An inn scene
60 The frigidarium of the Baths of Caracalla
61 Bathers wrestling in a palaestra
62 Masseur's oil-container, strigils and oil-pan
63 A dinner party
64-7 Roman silverware of the second century A.D.
68 The triclinium of the Palace of Domitian
69 Silver cup
70 Drinking horns
71 Women's hair styles
72 Street musicians and musical instruments
73 An orator
74 Writing equipment
75 The Theatre of Pompey, the Odeon and Stadium of Domitian, and the Baths of Nero and Agrippa
76 The Colosseum and the Colossus of Nero
77 The Circus Maximus
78 A four-horse chariot rounding one of the turning-posts in the circus
79 Gladiator's arms
80 The Colosseum: duel between a retiarius and a mirmillo
81 Altar of Augustus and the Lares
82 Animals being led to sacrifice
83 A priest
84 Part of a Mithraic altar: Mithra slaying a bull
85 Part of the sarcophagus of a Christian and his wife, showing Christ the Good Shepherd

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Customer Reviews

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Sort by: Showing all of 4 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 7, 2007

    A reviewer

    In striving to understand the origin and growth of Western Civilization, it is imperative to appreciate the historical changes that Rome has undergone, and F.R Cowell¿s, Life in ancient Rome gives a well written, clearly researched, vision into aspects of daily life throughout Rome¿s historical past. Cowell¿s work provokes readers to consider the linked matters of Rome¿s ancient past to those of present times. The reader is taken candidly through the changing history of Roman people¿s daily lives. From ¿Growing up in ancient Rome,¿ to ¿Earning a Living,¿ and ¿Leisure Hours¿, Cowell covers the many cultural aspects of Roman peoples education, money, clothing, baths, and high society. Cowell also addresses the importance of such cultural interests as music, oratory, and the chariot races, to name a few. Life in Ancient Rome provides insight into what often may be considered irrelevant, mundane aspects of life. For instance, ¿Romans did not cover their floors, in the Eastern fashion, with carpets. It was just as well, because their table manners were primitive and no carpet would have remained fit for use in a Roman dining-room.¿ 'Cowell, 26' Being privy to such a small triviality as knowing Roman people¿s lack of table manners provides us with an affirmation to further understand the Roman people¿s human condition in these times. Another example of Life in Ancient Rome providing us with a glimpse into the human condition of these ancient Romans was Cowell¿s presentation of the importance of the Baths to the Roman people. ¿Romans went to the baths to meet others, to stroll around and talk, some to play ball and others games. The Baths were notorious for the noise coming from them, for Romans liked to sing in their baths, to whistle, to talk and shout at their friends and acquaintances.¿ 'Cowell, 146' With what Cowell writes of Roman bathers 'whistling, talking, and singing in their baths', we are given a more humanistic impression of the Roman people truly enjoying the Baths, and thus we gain an equal understanding of why they were so important to Romans citizens. This book represents the author¿s awareness of important figures in providing much of the information we have on these ancient people. ¿Every one of his pages displays his familiarity with historians, poets, satirists, orators, and letter writers.¿ 'Blease' A perfect example of Cowell using important historical figures to substantiate his concepts would be his use of Virgil, the Poet, Cicero, the Orator, and even Lucretius, a Poet, and Philosopher, in presenting readers with as complete as possible an image of what Roman family life was like. Most history books on Roman life focus on individuals, dates, and the occurrence of significant events of the past without giving contemporary readers a guideline. In contrast, Life in Ancient Rome provides an impression for the origin of many things in the present. A representation of this is offered in Cowells description of Festivals and Games. ¿Romans kept up several traditional religious observances, such as that in honour of Janus, guardian spirit of entrances to towns and homes¿His name survives in the word January.¿ 'Cowell, 187' Another example is Cowell¿s contemporary application of Ancient Rome¿s philosophies is ¿Roman law continued to exhibit a vigour and a vitality that have ensured its survival over large parts of Europe as a basis of that Rule of Law which is among the more enduring titles of the Roman Republic to lasting cultural renowned.¿ 'Cowell, 130'

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 6, 2003

    The Big Picture

    This book provides the big picture regarding life in ancient Rome as well as details of day-to-day life. Most history books focus on the dates, individuals and significant events without providing a frame of reference for the modern-day reader. This book sheds new light on books I have previously read of and about the genre. It is essential reading for anyone studying the classics. I'd like to see a series covering other historical periods such as ancient Greece and colonial America, etc. I wish I read it sooner. History in school should be introduced in this way.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 30, 2000

    Wonderful Information on the Life of Romans

    I had to write a paper on the social aspects of ancient Rome for a class. This book was just what I needed when other sources gave me the same old information over and over.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 29, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

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