Life Lived Like a Story: Life Stories of Three Yukon Native Elders

Overview


Of Athapaskan and Tlingit ancestry, Angela Sidney, Kitty Smith, and Annie Ned lived in the southern Yukon Territory for nearly a century. They collaborated with Julie Cruikshank, an assistant professor in the Department of Anthropology at the University of British Columbia, to produce this unique kind of autobiography.
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Overview


Of Athapaskan and Tlingit ancestry, Angela Sidney, Kitty Smith, and Annie Ned lived in the southern Yukon Territory for nearly a century. They collaborated with Julie Cruikshank, an assistant professor in the Department of Anthropology at the University of British Columbia, to produce this unique kind of autobiography.
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Editorial Reviews

Booknews
Three women of Athabascan and Tlingit ancestry, who had lived nearly a century in the southern Yukon Territory of Canada, told the stories of their lives to Cruikshank (anthropology, U. of British Columbia) over the course of a decade. The stories reveal both a way of life and a unique perspective on many historical events. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)
Michael Dorris
"This is an exemplary work. . . . It is thorough, clear, and wonderfully detailed. What's more, it is co-authored in a real, rather than a fictive sense, bringing to the reader a kind of authenticity and bite that is rarely available. . . . Certainly specialists will be fascinated with this study, but it is so readable, so interesting, so innovative, that I think it will appeal to a wide audience. . . . [It] should be a cornerstone in Native American studies. And essential reading in women's studies, northern studies, and to anyone curious about alternative ways of seeing the world and living a life. It ultimately stands alone, proof that there is progress in anthropological method and description."—Michael Dorris, author of The Broken Cord
Toronto Globe and Mail

"There is pure gold here for those who want to understand the rules of the old ways. . . . [The book] has a convincing sureness, an intensity which cannot be denied, a strong sense of family. . . . Candidly, and often with sly humour, the three women discuss early white-Indian relations, the Klondike gold rush, the epidemics, the starvation, the healthy and wealthy times, and building of the Alaska Highway. . . . Integrity is here, and wisdom. There is no doubting the authenticity of the voices. As women, they had power and they used it wisely, and through their words and Cruikshank's skills, you will change your mind if you think the anthropological approach to oral history can only be dull."—Barry Broadfoot, Toronto Globe and Mail

— Barry Broadfoot

Toronto Globe and Mail - Barry Broadfoot
"There is pure gold here for those who want to understand the rules of the old ways. . . . [The book] has a convincing sureness, an intensity which cannot be denied, a strong sense of family. . . . Candidly, and often with sly humour, the three women discuss early white-Indian relations, the Klondike gold rush, the epidemics, the starvation, the healthy and wealthy times, and building of the Alaska Highway. . . . Integrity is here, and wisdom. There is no doubting the authenticity of the voices. As women, they had power and they used it wisely, and through their words and Cruikshank's skills, you will change your mind if you think the anthropological approach to oral history can only be dull."—Barry Broadfoot, Toronto Globe and Mail
From the Publisher
This is an exemplary work … It is thorough, clear, and wonderfully detailed. What's more, it is co-authored in a real, rather than fictive sense, bringing to the reader a kind of authenticity and bite that is rarely available … Certainly specialists will be fascinated with this study, but it is so readable, so interesting, so innovative, that I think it will appeal to a wide audience … [It should be a cornerstone in Native American studies, and essential reading in women's studies, northern studies, and to anyone curious about alternative ways of seeing the world and living a life. It ultimately stands alone, proof that there is progress in anthropological method and description. -- Michael Dorris, author of The Broken Cord There is pure gold here for those who want to understand the rules of the old ways … [The book has a convincing sureness, an intensity which cannot be denied, a strong sense of family … Candidly, and often with sly humour, the three women discuss early white-Indian relations, the Klondike gold rush, the epidemics, the starvation, the healthy and wealthy times, and building of the Alaska Highway …. Integrity is here, and wisdom. There is no doubting the authenticity of the voices. As women, they had power and they used it wisely, and through their words and Cruikshank's skills, you will change your mind if you think the anthropological approach to oral history can only be dull. -- Barry Broadfoot, Globe and Mail Life Lived Like a Story is not a standard biography or autobiography. Instead, it remains true to the native way of recounting the past by giving appropriate weight to stories and songs as well as reminiscences. . . . . The charm, the wisdom (and often cheekiness) of these three women rings clear. -- Hugh Wilson, The Montreal Gazette
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780803263529
  • Publisher: University of Nebraska Press
  • Publication date: 4/1/2002
  • Series: American Indian Lives Series
  • Pages: 404
  • Sales rank: 1,333,745
  • Product dimensions: 0.94 (w) x 6.00 (h) x 9.00 (d)

Meet the Author


Julie Cruikshank's books include The Stolen Woman: Female Journeys in Tagish and Tutchone Narrative (1982).
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Table of Contents







Preface

Linguistic Note

Introduction: Life History and Life Stories

Part I: My Stories Are My Wealth / Angela
Sidney

Part II: My Roots Grow in Jackpine Roots /
Kitty Smith

Part III: Old-Style Words Are Just Like School /
Annie Ned

Cultural Constructions of Individual Experience

Notes

Glossary of Native Terms

Bibliography

Index

Map 1. Languages spoken in southern Yukon Territory

Figure 1. Partial family tree of Deisheetaan ancestors of Mrs.
Angela Sidney

Figure 2. Partial family tree of Dakl'aweidi ancestors of Mrs.
Angela Sidney

Figure 3. Partial family tree of ancestors of Mrs. Kitty Smith

Figure 4. Partial family tree of ancestors of Mrs. Annie Ned


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