The Life Of Abraham Lincoln

The Life Of Abraham Lincoln

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by Henry Ketcham
     
 

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Abraham Lincoln remains one of the greatest political figures in American history. Although his portrait and achievements as a statesman are well recorded, little is known about his personal life. This light and enjoyable biography, published at the beginning of the 20th century, fills this gap by portraying a more human and accessible Lincoln.  See more details below

Overview

Abraham Lincoln remains one of the greatest political figures in American history. Although his portrait and achievements as a statesman are well recorded, little is known about his personal life. This light and enjoyable biography, published at the beginning of the 20th century, fills this gap by portraying a more human and accessible Lincoln.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781781390931
Publisher:
Benediction Books
Publication date:
02/25/2012
Pages:
332
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.88(d)

Read an Excerpt


CHAPTER III. EARLY YEARS. The year 1809 was fruitful in the birth of great men in the Anglo-Saxon race. In that year were born Charles Darwin, scientist, Alfred Tennyson, poet, William E. Gladstone, statesman, and, not least, Abraham Lincoln, liberator. Thomas Lincoln was left fatherless in early boyhood, and grew up without any schooling or any definite work. For the most part he did odd jobs as they were offered. He called himself a carpenter. But in a day when the outfit of tools numbered only about a half dozen, and when every man was mainly his own carpenter, this trade could not amount to much. Employment was unsteady and pay was small. Thomas Lincoln, after his marriage to Nancy Hanks, lived in Elizabethtown, Ky., where the first child, Sarah, was born. Shortly after this event he decided to combine farming with his trade of carpentering, and so removed to a farm fourteen miles out, situated in what is now LaRue County, where his wife, on the twelfth day of February, 1809, gave birth to the son whom he named Abraham after his father's father. The child was born in a log cabin of a kind very common in that day and for many years later. Lincoln's Boyhood Home in Kentucky. It was built four-square and comprised only one room, one window, and a door. Here they lived fqr a little more than four years, when the father removed to another farm about fifteen miles further to the northeast. The occasion of this removal and of the subsequent one, two or three years later, was undoubtedly the uncertainty of land titles in Kentucky in that day. This " roving disposition " cannot fairly be charged to shiftlessness. In spite of the extraordinary disadvantages of Thomas Lincoln's earlylife, he lived as well as his neighbors, though that was humble enough, and accum...

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Life of Abraham Lincoln 4.7 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 6 reviews.
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I loved and thoroughly enjoyed this book! From start to finish, this was a very easy read, but highly enlightening work about the life of whom I consider to be our greatest President. It was every bit as informative to me as some of the more intellectual, modern academic works about Lincoln that have emerged over the years. A word of warning, though--it does not pretend to take a non-biased examination of the man's life. It does not even make any pretext of viewing its subject objectively. The author clearly views his subject with iconic admiration. The book also completely omits or quickly glosses over some very key historic events, particularly during the critical years of the civil war. It is unfortunate that Lincoln's meetings with Frederick Douglas are not even mentioned, and other important interactions with key people who played such vital roles in his life (such as his own wife Mary Todd, or his relationships with Edwin Stanton or Edward Bates) are only given a few mere sentences. Still, for a biography on such a complex, multi-dimensional individual, it does a good, overall job of covering not only one man's amazingly accomplished life of 56 years, but the torturous maturing of a nation trapped in its early stages of development by a completely unrealistic, idealistic vision that it could continue to grow and exist peaceably without dealing with the poisonous problem of the institution of slavery. If nothing else, Hank Ketcham's work should make you realize that no matter what may have been accomplished on the battlefield, it took the extraordinary will and resolution of one man, destined to be in the right place at the right time, to finally turn a predominantly favored white man's class-structured republic toward the long and difficult road of emerging into a modern democracy that still continues to influence the world today.