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Life of Henry V: New Kittredge Shakespeare

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Overview


Appropriate for all level of Shakespeare courses, including courses on Shakespeare, or drama, or Renaissance drama as taught in departments of English, courses in Shakespeare or drama taught in departments of theater, Great Books programs where individual volumes might be used, or high school level courses.

Completely re-edited, the New Folger Library edition of Shakepeare's play puts readers in touch with current ways of thinking about Shakespeare. Each volume ...

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Overview


Appropriate for all level of Shakespeare courses, including courses on Shakespeare, or drama, or Renaissance drama as taught in departments of English, courses in Shakespeare or drama taught in departments of theater, Great Books programs where individual volumes might be used, or high school level courses.

Completely re-edited, the New Folger Library edition of Shakepeare's play puts readers in touch with current ways of thinking about Shakespeare. Each volume contains full explanatory notes on the page facing the text of the play, as well as a helpful introduction to Shakespeare's language. New edition.

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

The New Kittredge Series is both a delight and a steal. Kittredge’s textual authority, updated by eminent scholars sensitive to classroom needs and alert to staging choices, is once again available in these slim, elegant, inexpensive, user-friendly volumes. With lucid notes and incisive introductions geared especially to popular film versions, the series also offers an overview of both stage and film performances of each play. A must for any Shakespeare class.
- Dr. Laury Magnus

Even as the New Kittredge Shakespeare series glances back to George Lyman Kittredge's student editions of the plays, it is very much of our current moment: the slim editions are targeted largely at high school and first-year college students who are more versed in visual than in print culture. Not only are the texts of the plays accompanied by photographs or stills from various stage and cinema performances: the editorial contributions are performance-oriented, offering surveys of contemporary film interpretations, essays on the plays as performance pieces, and an annotated filmography. Traditional editorial issues (competing versions of the text, cruxes, editorial emendation history) are for the most part excluded; the editions focus instead on clarifying the text with an eye to performing it. There is no disputing the pedagogic usefulness of the New Kittredge Shakespeare's performance-oriented approach. At times, however, it can run the risk of treating textual issues as impediments, rather than partners, to issues of performance. This is particularly the case with a textually vexed play such as Pericles: Prince of Tyre. In the introduction to the latter, Jeffrey Kahan notes the frequent unintelligibility of the play as originally published: "the chances of a reconstructed text matching what Shakespeare actually wrote are about 'nil'" (p. xiii) But his solution — to use a "traditional text" rather than one corrected as are the Oxford and Norton Pericles — obscures how this "traditional text," including its act and scene division, is itself a palimpsest produced through three centuries of editorial intervention. Nevertheless, the series does a service to its target audience with its emphasis on performance and dramaturgy. Kahan's own essay about his experiences as dramaturge for a college production of Pericles is very good indeed, particularly on the play's inability to purge the trace of incestuous desire that Pericles first encounters in Antioch. Other plays' cinematic histories: Annalisa Castaldo's edition of Henry V contrasts Laurence Oliver's and Branagh's film productions; Samuel Crowl's and James Wells's edition of (respectively) I and 2 Henry IV concentrate on Welle's Chimes at Midnight and Gus Van Sant's My Own Private Idaho; Patricia Lennox's edition of As You Like It offers an overview of four Hollywood and British film adaptations; and John R. Ford's edition of A Midsummer Night's Dream provides a spirited survey of the play's rich film history.

The differences between, and comparative merits of, various editorial series are suggested by the three editions of The Taming of the Shrew published this year. Laury Magnus's New Kittredge Shakespeare edition is, like the other New Kittredge volumes, a workable text for high school and first year college students interested in film and theater. The introduction elaborates on one theme — Elizabethan constructions of gender — and offers a very broad performance history, focusing on Sam Taylor's and Zeffirelli's film versions as well as adaptations such as Kiss Me Kate and Ten Things I Hate About You (accompanied by a still of ten hearthtrobs Heath Ledger and Julia Stiles). The volume is determined to eradicate any confusion that a first time reader of the play might experience: the dramatis personae page explains that "Bianca Minola" is "younger daughter to Baptista, wooed by Lucentio-in-disguise (as Cambio) and then wife to him, also wooed by the elderly Gremio and Hortensio-in-disguise (as Licio)" (p.1). Other editorial notes, based on Kittredge's own, are confined mostly to explaining individual words and phrases: additional footnotes discuss interpretive choices made by film and stage productions. Throughout, the editorial emphasis is on the play less as text than as performance piece, culminating in fifteen largely performance-oriented "study questions" on topics such as disguise, misogyny, and violence.

Studies in English Literature, Tudor and Stuart Drama, Volume 51, Spring 2011, Number 2, pages 497-499.

Library Journal
The three individual plays launch the third edition of the venerable "Arden Shakespeare" series, which will see the entire canon reproduced in superior scholarly editions by the year 2000. The First Folio is a facsimile edition of the original 1623 publication of the bard's works.
From The Critics
William Shapkespeare's Henry V receives a gratifying full-cast narration and production which brings to life the underlying ironies and contrasts inherent in Shakespeare's play. The complete text here has been fully dramatized from the New Cambridge Shakespeare text and is truly outstanding.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781585101610
  • Publisher: Focus Publishing/R. Pullins Company, Incorporated
  • Publication date: 10/28/2006
  • Series: New Kittredge Shakespeare Series
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 144
  • Sales rank: 1,262,186
  • Product dimensions: 5.40 (w) x 8.40 (h) x 0.40 (d)

Meet the Author


Annalisa Castaldo (Ph.D. Temple University) is Assistant Professor of English at Widener. Her scholarly interests are Shakespeare and popular culture, and performance studies. She is fiction editor of the "Shakespeares After Shakespeare" reference work, which catalogues uses of Shakespeare in popular culture.
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Table of Contents

Preface
A Note on the Text
Abbreviated Genealogy of the Mortimers and the House of Lancaster
The Text of 1 Henry IV 1
Contexts and Sources
Composition and Publication 97
Excerpt from the 1598 Quarto 97
The Structural Problem in Shakespeare's Henry the Fourth 100
History, Theatricality, and the "Structural Problem" in the Henry IV Plays 114
The Fortunes of Oldcastle 129
Reforming Falstaff 149
Origins 166
Shakespearean History and the Reign of Henry IV 167
Henry, Prince of Wales 184
Elizabeth and the Uniting of the Two Houses 185
An Homilee agaynst disobedience and wylful rebellion 186
The Chronicles of England 189
The Ciuile Wars 200
The Famous Victories of Henry the Fifth 207
Criticism
The Composition of a Character 219
Falstaff 219
Hal, Falstaff, and Taste 220
The Courage of Falstaff 223
The Falstaff Myth 225
Gadshill Revisited 234
The Second Tetralogy 248
Providence and Propaganda 256
Tillyard, History, and Ideology 267
Symmetry and Disorder 274
Knowledge and Misjudgement 277
Theater and Power 284
Performing 1 Henry IV 312
"The King Hath Many Marching in His Coats," or, What Did You Do in the War, Daddy? 330
Mingling Kings and Clowns 347
The Battle of Carnival and Lent 359
Welles and Falstaff 366
Falstaff 381
Masculine Identities 383
My Own Private Idaho 387
Shakespeare in Idaho 392
Gender and Nation 409
Defining the Nation 433
Endings 452
Selected Bibliography 471
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First Chapter

(INDUCTION)

Enter Rumor, painted full of tongues.

[RUMOR]

Open your ears, for which of you will stop
The vent of hearing when loud Rumor speaks?
I, from the orient to the drooping west,
Making the wind my post-horse, still unfold
The acts commenced on this ball of earth.
Upon my tongues continual slanders ride,
The which in every language I pronounce,
Stuffing the ears of men with false reports.
I speak of peace while covert enmity Under the smile of safety wounds the world.
And who but Rumor, who but only I,
Make fearful musters and prepared defense
Whiles the big year, swoll'n with some other grief,
Is thought with child by the stern tyrant war,
And no such matter? Rumor is a pipe
Blown by surmises, jealousies, conjectures,
And of so easy and so plain a stop
That the blunt monster with uncounted heads,
The still-discordant wav'ring multitude,
Can play upon it. But what need I thus
My well-known body to anatomize
Among my household? Why is Rumor here?
I run before King Harry's victory,
Who in a bloody field by Shrewsbury
Hath beaten down young Hotspur and his troops,
Quenching the flame of bold rebellion
Even with the rebels' blood. But what mean I
To speak so true at first? My office is
To noise abroad that Harry Monmouth fell
Under the wrath of noble Hotspur's sword,
And that the King before the Douglas' rage
Stooped his anointed head as low as death.
This have I rumored through the peasant towns
Between that royal field of Shrewsbury
And this worm-eaten [hold] of ragged stone,
(Where) Hotspur's father, old Northumberland,
lies crafty-sick. The posts come tiring on,
And not a man of them brings other news
Than they have learnt of me. From Rumor's tongues
They bring smooth comforts false, worse than
true wrongs

[Rumor] exits.

Copyright © 1999 by The Folger Shakespeare Library

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 22, 2013

    Great for examining Shakespeare on film

    I really enjoyed the editor's notes in this version. They really focused on giving the reader not just a grasp of what some of the trickier language meant, but also worked to give you an idea of how it would be performed. It focused on performance in film, including photographs from Laurence Olivier's 1944 version as well as Kenneth Branagh's 1989 reimagining. Definitely a worthy version of Henry V to purchase!

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